Arizona Speech-Language-Hearing Association's 2024 Convention

April 12-13, 2024

ArSHA24-conven_logo_070723-FINAL

Location:

EL Conquistador Hotel
10000 N. Oracle Road
Tucson AZ 85704

Online Registration (member)

Online Registration (non-member)

Download the Convention Brochure

Please note: The early bird deadline has been extended to March 15, 2024!

Highlighted Presenters

Keynote

Tiffany Hines, PhD, CCC-SlP - Utilizing Interprofessional Collaboration in Schools to Promote Cultural Competence

Early Childhood

Nicole Allen, MS, CCC-SlP and Lisa Said, MEdGestalt Language Processors and the Role of Floortime Therapy
Keila Gutierrez, MA, CCC-SlPMultiple Oppositions: Practical Overview, Case Studies, & Clinical Tools

Schools

Marie Ireland, MEd, CCC-SlPEligibility for Speech Sound Disorders and Integrating Research and Regulations
Shelley Gray, PhD, CCC-SlPWorking Memory in Children

Medical

Aubrey Dunlap, MS, CCC-SlP, Natalie Monahan, MS, CCC-SlP, and Denise Stats-Caldwell, MS, CCC-SlPVoice Panel: Complex Cases in Voice in Upper Airway
Jessica Gregor, MS, CCC-SlP, BCS-SMoving Onward and Downward in VFSS: The Importance of Evaluating the Entire Swallowing Continuum
McKay Moore Sohlberg, PhDCognitive Rehabilitation Then and Now: What have We Learned in the Last Three Decades?
Keri Winchester, MS, CCC-SlP & Certified End of Life Doula/Educator – Ethics, Difficult Conversations and End of Life

Multi-interest

Tiffany Hines, PhD, CCC-SLPHarnessing the Power of AI and Designing a Tapestry of Diversity
Darrell Dern, SLPD, CCC-SLPSocial Learning Differences in Neurodiverse Adolescents: Establishing EBP Through a Capstone Research Project
Kathleen R. Cazzato, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, Karen Guilmette, MS, CCC-SLP, Janet Hawley, ClinScD, CCC- SLP, and Natalie Monahan, MS, CCC-SLPSupervising the Students of Today: Facing the Future Together
Teri James Bellis, PhD, CCC-A, FAAA, F-ASHAAssessment of and Intervention for Auditory Processing Deficits in Children
Davis Henderson, PhD, CCC-SLPThe Communication Style and Mannerism of the Navajo People
Jeffery Meeks, CCC-SLP and Vickie Jones, BS, C-SLPASLPA NOW; Professional and Ethical Issues Facing SLPAs and Their Supervisors in Arizona

Audiology

Audiology Grand Rounds - Nancy Flores, AuD, CCC-A, Jennie Mollerup-Wagner, AuD, CCC-A, and Linda Norrix, PhD
Haley Lanoue, AuD, CCC-A Interdisciplinary Approach to Vestibular Audiology Evaluation and Physical Therapy Management
Aparna Rao, PhD and Kate Helms-Tillery, PhD, CCC-SLPLiving Well With Hearing Loss
Bridget Shanahan-Herrick, AuD, PASC, ABAC, FAAA, CCC-A – Pediatric Audiology
Thomas Muller, AuD, CCC-A, Erica Hansen, AuD, CCC-A, and Amy WheelerUniversity of Arizona Advocacy for AHCCCS Coverage of Hearing Devices/ Services for Adults

Friday, April 12

1241
8:00 am – 9:00 am
Pediatric SLP    |   S01

Keynote Speaker
Designing a Tapestry of Diversity: Utilizing Interprofessional Collaboration in Schools to Promote Cultural Competence (DEI)

Tiffany Hines, CCC-SLP, PhD, A.T. Still University

This presentation will explore the role of interprofessional collaboration in school-based speech language therapy to foster diversity and inclusion through cultural competence.  Information presented will emphasize the transformative power of collaboration between the SLP and other professionals including occupational therapists, physical therapists, educators, school psychologists, social workers, interpreters, and families in creating an intricate tapestry of support for children with communication disorders from diverse backgrounds. As the student population becomes increasingly diverse, it is essential for SLPs to adopt more inclusive practices that honor and celebrate the unique identities and experiences of their students. It is important to build partnerships with other professionals as well as families of these students to develop a comprehensive and holistic approach to evaluation, diagnosis and intervention.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Identify successful models of interprofessional collaboration,
  • Discuss the significance of open communication, knowledge-sharing, and shared decision-making in assessment and intervention,
  • Discover how collaborative efforts can identify and address co-existing learning challenges, social-emotional factors, and cognitive aspects that impact communication development
  • Explore the critical role of family-centered care in fostering diversity and inclusion

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Time Ordered Agenda

10 minutes       Introduction, disclosures and learning objectives
5 minutes         Defining cultural competence
20 minutes       Building Interprofessional models
10 minutes       Incorporating family-centered care in schools
10 minutes       Actionable steps
5 minutes         Conclusion and Q&A


1242
9:15 am – 10:45 am
Multi-Interest    |   S02

Harnessing the Power of AI (DEI)

Tiffany Hines, CCC-SLP, PhD, A. T. Still University

Alexa, can you help me write this evaluation report? As technology advances, Artificial Intelligence (AI) presents a unique opportunity for SLPs to enhance the quality and efficiency of speech-language evaluations and interventions. In this session, SLPs will discover innovative ways to integrate AI into their therapy practices and discover practical strategies for using AI tools, software, apps, and techniques that address the unique needs of today’s students.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Gain a comprehensive understanding of how AI can be integrated into therapy sessions.
  • Dissect real-world case studies while participating in interactive discussions
  • Attain practical insights and actionable strategies to leverage AI effectively in their school-based speech therapy practices.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Time Ordered Agenda

5 minutes         Introduction, disclosures and learning objectives
20 minutes       AI basics and real world case studies
10 minutes       Interactive AI activity and application
15 minutes       Intergrading AI into Speech-Language therapy
5 minutes         Resource Sharing
5 minutes         Conclusion and Q&A


1212
9:15 am - 10:45 am
Multi-Interest    |   S03

Therapeutic Relationships and Alliances: Common Factors and Speech-Language Pathology

Colin Macpherson, CCC-SLP, Midwestern University

The development of a therapeutic relationship and alliance between the speech-language pathologist (SLP) and client may be essential to positive client outcomes (Ebert & Kohnert, 2010; Sylvestre & Gobeil, 2020). Numerous studies in disciplines of clinical psychology and counseling have addressed the role of "common factors" in the development of a therapeutic alliance. Indeed, the role of the therapeutic alliance is considered to contribute more to clinical outcomes than many empirically supported treatments (Wampold, 2015). If the development of a therapeutic relationship and alliance plays a role in the successful treatment of individuals with communication disorders, it is imperative that we identify "common factors" that SLPs employ to establish and facilitate strong therapeutic relationships and alliances (Ebert & Kohnert, 2010).  The purpose of this seminar will be to acquaint both student and practicing SLPs with the role of common factors in negative and positive client outcomes. Literature from clinical psychology and speech language pathology will be reviewed to improve participant knowledge of how an understanding of "common factors',  therapeutic relationships, and therapeutic alliances may result in improved clinical outcomes for our clients. Participants will also develop their knowledge of various surveys and tools that can be used to develop their skills in employing common factors to achieve successful therapeutic relationships and alliances. Additionally, the adaptation of the contextual model (Wampold, 2015) to speech language pathology will be presented as an alternative to the traditional medical model of evaluation and treatment in speech language pathology.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe the role of the therapeutic relationship and alliance in the treatment of communication disorders.
  • Identify two surveys they can use to enhance their knowledge of personal common factors.
  • Describe the difference between the traditional medical model and the contextual model in the treatment of communication disorders.

Level of Learning: Introductory


1209
9:15 am - 10:45 am
Adult SLP    |   S04

Head and Neck Cancer; A Million-Dollar Diagnosis With Possible Accessories

Carolyn Abraham, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, CLT, Private Clinical Practice

Speech pathologists are often tasked with seeing Head and Neck Cancer Patients with treatment challenges and limitations including dysphagia, xerostomia, trismus, lymphedema and much more. There are many tools available to patients that are on the market; and while some are covered by insurance, many are not. Speech pathologists best serve their patients when they are educated consumers guiding patients through these tools. This presentation will focus on many of the available devices, the pros and cons of these devices, and the application of them to additional patient populations.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe three tools and/or devices available to patients to manage their symptom burden and to treat them effectively.
  • List the pros and cons of the devices available, in addition to cost benefit analysis.
  • Explain how to implement these tools in additional patient populations.

Level of Learning: Intermediate


1216
9:15 am - 10:45 am
Pediatric SLP   |   S05

Partnering With Families to Improve AAC Outcomes

Michelle Raymond, BCS-CL, CCC-SLP, MA, University of Arizona

Barriers to AAC use often include a lack of support for the child within the home and community. Families often feel overwhelmed or unsupported in meeting their child’s needs. Mixed messages from multiple professionals often complicates family involvement. In this session, participants learn about models of care that support families as communication partners and increase family involvement By creating a partnership with families to improve access to AAC for children with complex communication needs, families will increase ownership of AAC across settings.  Participants will learn strategies to address common challenges for lack of involvement and other barriers that decrease use of AAC in the home and communit

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe models of care to improve  AAC use in the home and community.
  • Identify behaviors of adult learners to support AAC use for children in the home.
  • List strategies to address common challenges related to family involvement.

Level of Learning: Intermediate


1260
11:00 am – 12:30 pm
Pediatric SLP   |   S06

Eligibility for Speech Sound Disorders: Integrating Research and Regulations

Marie Ireland, Med, CCC-SLP, Charles Sturt University

Students with Speech Sound Disorders (SSD) make up a large part of SLP caseloads in schools.  Since 2018, newly published data on speech sound acquisition has created questions for many SLPs. Participants will review research in speech sound disorders and the requirements for evaluation and eligibility in schools.   A review of research and evaluation and eligibility resources will be provided. SLPs are encouraged to consider their evaluation and eligibility practices for SSD and subsequent impact on caseloads.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Identify free professional development offerings for both assessment and treatment of speech sound disorders in children.
  • Locate online information on state regulations and guidance to support school based practice.
  • List examples of tools that can be used to evaluate children  and document IDEA requirements for eligibility.

Level of Learning: Intermediate


1215
11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Multi-Interest    |   S07

The ABCs of Supervising Gen Z (Supervision)

Danielle Reed, CCC-SLP, EdD, Midwestern University

Baby boomers, Generation X, Millenials, oh my! Effective graduate clinician supervision and CF mentorship require SLPs to be knowledgeable in evidence-based clinical practices as well as supervision models and techniques. Preceptors and mentors must also prepare to meet the needs of the individuals that they supervise. As Generation Z, born 1997-2010, is and will be our largest group of SLPs entering graduate school and the workforce for the next decade, it is essential to meet their unique needs. Literature is starting to address how to best educate and supervise these individuals. However, this literature is emerging slowly and may not promptly aid supervisors and mentors currently providing supervision. This presentation will review the ABCs of Supervising Gen Z by discussing the characteristics of Generation Z individuals, fundamental supervision models, and the most effective supervision techniques for this generation of students and SLPs.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • List three unique characteristics of Generation Z individuals.
  • Describe supervision models and how they intersect with the characteristics and needs of Generation Z.
  • Choose three techniques that would be useful in the supervision or mentorship of Generation Z students/CFs.

Level of Learning: Introductory

Time Ordered Agenda

5 minutes         Introductions and Disclosures
15 minutes       Generation Z overview
5 minutes         Research and Evidence
5 minutes         Supervision Foundations
50 minutes       Approaches for supervising and communicating with Gen Z
10 minutes       Collaboration and Questions


1213
11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Adult SLP    |   S08

Preparedness of Arizona PTs, OTs and SLPs for Working With Patients With Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias

Tamara Turner, OTD, OTR/L, Midwestern University
Patrice Ayala, PT, DPT, Midwestern University
Stephanie Christensen, CCC-SLP, Midwestern University
Malathy Venkatesh, CCC-SLP,  A.T. Still University

Arizona is anticipated to experience a 33.3 percent increase in the number of individuals with dementia from 2020 to 2025 (Alzheimer’s association 2023).  As the disease progresses over the years from preclinical Alzheimer’s disease to severe dementia, the individuals with dementia will present with unique healthcare challenges necessitating the services of physical therapists (PTs), occupational therapists (OTs), and speech-language pathologists (SLPs).  This study aimed to explore the experiences and views of PTs, OTs and SLPs regarding their preparedness for working with individuals with Alzheimer’s Disease and related dementias (ADRD). A purposive sample was used to recruit practitioners from each discipline and from various adult practice settings. A total of 75 practitioners were recruited for the study.  Practitioners completed questionnaires rating their knowledge of evidence-based approaches for ADRD. Eighteen focus groups were held with mixed disciplines and settings.  The discussion focused on practitioner thoughts about therapeutic potential of patients with ADRD , challenges experienced in service delivery and supports needed for working with ADRD patients.  Focus groups were recorded, transcribed, coded, and combined into themes. Preliminary findings indicate practitioners did not feel they had the required knowledge to use evidence-based therapeutic approaches and  felt ill-prepared to work with  patients with ADRD.  Practitioners identified various challenges experienced and supports needed to improve their comfort level in working with patients with ADRD. We discuss themes from each area, challenges  across disciplines and settings, and ways academic organizations, clinical settings and therapy managers can help address these barriers.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Identify the barriers in quality service delivery for individuals with dementia
  • Recognize the advanced knowledge and skills required to meet the unique needs of individuals with dementia
  • List at least three methods to address the knowledge and skill gaps identified in this study

Level of Learning: Intermediate


1225
11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Pediatric SLP    |   S09

Using AAC to Unlock Communicative Potential in Late-Talking Toddlers

Angelica McCarron, CCC-SLP, Tucson Medical Center, University of Arizona
Sarah Cretcher, CCC-SLP, University of Arizona

Traditionally, clinicians consider use of mid-high tech AAC devices most often for children with complex disabilities affecting independent motor speech use. This presentation seeks to dispel this misconception and help clinicians expand their repertoire of early intervention approaches to include AAC, even for children without complex and chronic sensorimotor disabilities. There is emerging rationale for use of AAC in early-intervention with late-talking toddlers, especially those who may not be responsive to other intervention methods. This session will outline traditional early intervention approaches and summarize the evidence base for use of AAC in early intervention. Most importantly, this session will help therapists identify clinical features that may indicate when to use AAC in their early intervention practice as well as how to incorporate mid-high tech speech-generating systems during therapy in order to support vocal output in previously nonverbal toddlers.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Summarize traditional early intervention strategies for late-talking toddlers  & summarize the evidenced-based rationale for use of AAC in early intervention
  • List at least three clinical features that may predict low responsiveness to traditional treatment approaches for late language emergence in toddlers
  • Define how speech generating systems support vocal output
  • Identify at least two ways to incorporate AAC into early intervention treatment sessions with nonverbal toddlers

Level of Learning: Introductory


1261
1:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Pediatric SLP   |   S10

Eval and Eligibility in Schools: Approach to Comprhensive Assessment

Marie Ireland, MEd, CCC-SLP, Charles Sturt University

SLPs must understand the many requirements for evaluation and eligibility for SLPs services that federal and state law set forth for U.S. schools. Comprehensive evaluation and documentation of all required eligibility criteria can help school SLPs combat overidentification, high SLP caseloads, and civil rights concerns. This session will integrate federal and state regulations with best practice and the latest research in the field. Case studies will highlight the need for professionals to differentiate educational and medical regulations and requirements and provide opportunities to discuss communication with families and others.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Identify specific requirements for evaluation and eligibility in schools
  • Document all required steps for eligibility with team members to ensure IDEA compliant decision making
  • Identify differences between educational identification and clinical diagnosis

Level of Learning: Intermediate


1246
1:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Multi-Interest    |   S11

Assessment of and Intervention for Auditory Processing Deficits in Children, Part 1

Teri James Bellis, PhD, Professor Emerita, University of South Dakota

This presentation will present methods of assessing auditory processing and listening difficulties in children. The focus will be on the identification of areas of auditory deficit for the purpose of developing deficit-specific intervention plans. Additional attention will be given to the importance of the audiologist’s contribution to a variety of activities, including inter-professional teams, that go beyond mere identification of peripheral hearing status.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe several methods of assessing auditory perceptual difficulties in children
  • Delineate categories of diagnostic tests of Central Auditory Processing Disorder
  • Discuss the importance of deficit-specific intervention for children with auditory processing difficulties

Level of Learning: Intermediate


1262
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
Medical SLP   |   S12

Voice Panel: Complex Cases in Voice and  Upper Airway

Aubrey Dunlap, MS, CCC-SLP, Midwestern University
Natalie Monahan, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Arizona
Denise Stats-Caldwell, MA, CCC-SLP, Arizona State University

Abstract: Coming Soon

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

Coming Soon

Level of Learning:

Coming Soon


1263
1:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Multi-Interest   |   S13

Gestalt Language Processors and the Role of Floortime Therapy

Nicole Allen, MS, CCC-SLP, Private Practice
Lisa Said, MS, CCC-SLP, Private Practice

Gestalt language processors (GLPs) acquire language in chunks and often present as ‘echolalic’. In this session, we will explore the six stages of GLPs and share our experience in using DIRFloortime as a therapy support. We discuss the first four Functional Emotional Developmental Capacities of DIR Floortime. Our data includes  several video samples of the impact on this child-led play based therapy in patients that use both oral language as well as Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) devices to share data on the positive impacts on this therapy in GLPs.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Identify the six stages of Gestalt Language Processors 
  • Describe Floortime therapy within the first four Functional Emotional Developmental Capacities
  • List the benefits of Floortime for GLP learners  
  • Describe the characteristics to consider for a GLP learner when considering AAC

Level of Learning:  Introductory


1264
3:15 pm - 4:45 pm
Multi-Interest   |   S14

The Communication Style and Mannerism of the Navajo People  (DEI)

Davis Henderson, PhD, CCC-SLP, Northern Arizona University

As my grandmother wove her rug she lectured many of her grandchildren to be “Be silent and to observe; yet be vocal and vigilant” all while not making eye contact with no one. Navajos, and other American Indians, communicate based on their cultural and traditional beliefs which may differ from Mainstream. These differences may be viewed as inappropriate as they do not adhere to the preferred style of communication by non-Navajo individuals. However, the communication style among Navajo homes are diverse as many Navajos come from traditional homes, modern/traditional homes, and modern homes. These diverse homes infuse different teaching and practices that influences the communication and mannerisms of many Navajo individual. This presentation highlights the style and mannerisms that are typical among Navajo homes which are appropriate and meaningful.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Determine how the communication style and mannerism differ from Navajo to mainstream.
  • Describe how SLP’s can adapt their communication styles to Navajo, and other AIs, individuals.
  • List three types of communication, or mannerisms, of Navajo individuals that were unknown.

Level of Learning:  Introductory

Time Ordered Agenda

5 minutes         Introduction
80 minutes       Presentation
15 minutes       Q and A


1257
3:15 pm - 4:45 pm
Multi-Interest    |   S15

Assessment of and Intervention for Auditory Processing Deficits in Children, Part 2

Teri James Bellis, PhD, Professor Emerita, University of South Dakota

This presentation will present methods of assessing auditory processing and listening difficulties in children. The focus will be on the identification of areas of auditory deficit for the purpose of developing deficit-specific intervention plans. Additional attention will be given to the importance of the audiologist’s contribution to a variety of activities, including inter-professional teams, that go beyond mere identification of peripheral hearing status.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe several methods of assessing auditory perceptual difficulties in children
  • Delineate categories of diagnostic tests of Central Auditory Processing Disorder
  • Discuss the importance of deficit-specific intervention for children with auditory processing difficulties

Level of Learning: Intermediate


1265
3:15 pm - 4:45 pm
Adult SLP   |   S16

Ethics, Difficult Conversations and End of Life. (Ethics)

Keri Winchester, MS, CCC-SLP, Certified End of Life Doula/Educator, Banner Gateway/Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center

This presentation will provide an overview of the various principles of ethics and ethical decision making.  You will learn about a framework for difficult conversations and questions to ask for providing goal concordant care.  And finally you will learn how recognize changes with end of life, how to support potential conversations and support patients and caregivers.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe various components of ethics and ethical decision making
  • Obtain resources for difficult conversations
  • List talking points for participating in difficult conversations
  • Describe basic information about the process of dying/end of life

Level of Learning:  Intermediate

Time Ordered Agenda

5 minutes         Introduction
30 minutes       Ethics
30 minutes       Difficult conversations
20 minutes       End of life
5 minutes         Q&A/Interactive wrap up


1258
3:15 pm - 4:45 pm
Pediatric SLP    |   S17

Multiple Oppositions: Practical Overview, Case Studies, & Clinical Tools

Keila Gutierrez, CCC-SLP, Desert Lily Bilingual Speech Therapy Clinic PLLC

I invite you to join me for a compelling presentation where we will demystify the multiple oppositions approach and discuss practical strategies for its implementation within your caseload. In our session, we will analyze authentic case studies, and I will offer pertinent clinical insights to enhance your understanding. This presentation integrates research-based literature with practical application. Your attendance promises not only educational value but also a professional and engaging experience.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • List three clinical characteristics that indicate the Multiple Oppositions treatment approach is an appropriate intervention for a child on your caseload
  • List three steps in the Multiple Oppositions treatment approach
  • List two strategies, based on the principles of motor learning, that can facilitate generalization

Level of Learning: Intermediate


Saturday, April 13

1222
8:00 am - 9:30 am
Pediatric SLP    |   S18

Language Evaluations for School-Age Children

Sarah Lynn Neiling, CCC-SLP, MA, University of Arizona
Melissa White, CCC-SLP, MA, University of Arizona

This presentation will center around selecting methods to evaluate language disorders in school-age children. We will discuss both standardized and non-standardized assessment methods, with a focus on understanding how to select and interpret standardized assessments for a particular purpose and population. This presentation is intended to be a practical guide and will be relevant for speech-language pathologists working with children in a variety of settings, including schools and clinics. In addition, we will cover culturally and linguistically responsive considerations particular to Arizona. Overall, this presentation is designed to help clinicians make evidence-based decisions surrounding testing for school-age children.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Evaluate whether a particular assessment is appropriate for a given purpose and population
  • Compare existing standardized assessments for language
  • Describe where to find supporting evidence to justify assessment choices

Level of Learning: Intermediate


1255
8:00 am - 9:30 am
Multi-Interest    |   S19

SLPA NOW!: Professional and Ethical Issues Facing SLPAs and Their Supervisors in Arizona (Ethics)

Jeffery Meeks, EdD, CCC-SLP, Northern Arizona University
Vickie Jones, SLPA, Tucson Charter School

SLPAs now will focus on current SLPA issues in Arizona. Our primary focus will be the  Code of Conduct, Scope of Practice and Ethical practices for SLPAs. This will also encompass looking at the roles and responsibilities of both the SLP and the SLPA in these areas as well as supervisory responsibilities for both the SLP and the SLPA. We will delve into professional social media presence, growth and expansion in the use of SLPAs, barriers to expansion, and utilization.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Identify the ethical issues facing SLPAs in a variety of settings.
  • Analyze the role of both the SLP and the SLPA in ethical and professional issues regarding supervision, documentation, and client services.
  • Describe the issues facing SLPAs as they work and practice in Arizona in a variety of settings.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Time Ordered Agenda

10 minutes       Introduction, disclosures and audience poll
5 minutes         Review of the SLPA licensing and certification
10 minutes       Review of supervision requirements AZ/ASHA
25 minutes       Ethics and the SLP-SLPA team
25 minutes       SLPA professional issues and resources
15 minutes       Audience question/answer and wrap-up


1237
8:00 am - 9:30 am
Adult SLP    |   S20

Cognitive Rehabilitation Then and Now: What Have We Learned in the Last Three Decades?  Part 1

McKay Moore Sohlberg, PhD, University of Oregon

Cognitive rehabilitation after brain injury is a complicated clinical undertaking that requires diverse knowledge and skills in the areas of cognitive processing, physical states, and psychosocial functioning, as well as behavior change and adaptation. Additionally, many different professional disciplines provide cognitive rehabilitation services, each with their own conceptual frameworks and practice methods. Together this has created a “black box” with inconsistent delivery and challenges in explaining the work to funders and other stakeholders. This presentation explores the progress that has occurred in the field over the last 30 years and reviews updates in our conceptualization and models of rehabilitation and applies them to three different treatment approaches.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe the Plan Implement & Evaluate (PIE) and Rehabilitation Treatment Specification System (RTSS) as applied to cognitive rehabilitation
  • Identify the key components of person-centered collaborative goal setting
  • Describe psychological mindedness practices that enhance working alliance, client engagement and psychoeducation
  • Describe treatment ingredients and the PIE process for; metacognitive strategy instruction, external aid training, use of attention drills (brain training)

Level of Learning: Intermediate


1259
8:00 am - 9:30 am
Audiology    |   S21

Becoming the GOAT: Pediatric Audiology

Bridget Shanahan Herrick, AuD, Arizona State University

Abstract:

Pediatric audiologists specialize in diagnosing and treating hearing loss in children. Many audiologists work on medical multidisciplinary teams to address speech/language development and progression of hearing loss or syndromes. Yet, children with hearing loss experience more challenges that just a deficit in their ears, such as learning challenges, social emotional challenges, and self-advocacy needs. Many of these needs may be addressed at school with support of their educational audiologist. The overall purpose of this presentation is to address ways we can work towards improving team collaboration between the clinical audiologist and school team.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Understand and add two additional items to their pediatric case history.
  • Recall the amount of deaf/hard of hearing students who complete high school and post-secondary education.
  • Outline options for aided testing for ensuring access to spoken information in the classroom.

Level of Learning: Introductory


1266
10:00 am - 11:30 am
Pediatric SLP  |   S22

Working Memory in Children

Shelley Gray, CCC-SLP, Arizona State University

Working memory encompasses an individual’s ability to process and store incoming information over brief periods of time. In this presentation we will review the different components of working memory in children. We know that working memory is a powerful predictor of learning in oral language, math, reading, and science. Because of this, children with learning difficulties who struggle academically are often assumed to have working memory deficits; however, in this presentation we will review research showing that working memory deficits do not always co-occur with developmental disabilities such as developmental language disorder or dyslexia and can occur in children with typical development (Gray, et al., 2019). This suggests that working memory assessments could contribute important information about children’s cognitive function over and above typical psycho-educational measures. It also suggests one possible explanation why some children compensate better than others for challenges presented by learning disabilities. Finally, we will review ways to support working memory in educational contexts.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • List the components of working memory
  • Describe whether all children with language learning disabilities have working memory problems
  • List three ways to support working memory in educational contexts

Level of Learning: Intermediate


1223
10:00 am - 11:30 am
Multi-Interest    |   S23

Tools You Can Use: Bilingual Assessment for Any SLP (DEI)

Victoria Clark, CCC-SLP, Arizona State University

Approximately a quarter of all Arizonans speak one or more languages other than English. This seminar draws on the best evidence available to support your referral and differential diagnosis of bilingual students or patients. SLPs in all settings are often in a position to make judgments about whether to a client is likely to have a speech-language disorder, or simply a speech-language difference as a speaker of a language variety or as an English Language Learner (ELL). Before referring for a bilingual evaluation, relevant information can be gathered by a monolingual clinician or a bilingual clinician, even those not speaking the home language of the client. In this seminar, a discussion of the most recent research on bilingual assessment, sources of converging evidence for diagnosis, and relevant assessment tools will be analyzed. Participants will practice using freely available assessments to gather information about bilingual clients for referral or differential diagnosis. Caregiver interview instruments and Dynamic Assessment tools from multiple sources will be presented and practiced within the session. Tools to describe language dominance will also be reviewed.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Differentiate between sources of converging evidence and how these can support diagnoses of speech-language differences vs. speech-language disorders.
  • Compare assessment tools that can be administered by bilingual or monolingual clinicians to build a case for a speech-language difference vs. disorder.
  • Apply understanding of converging evidence after practicing caregiver interview and dynamic assessment tools during the session.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Time Ordered Agenda

15 minutes       Bilingualism and difference vs. disorder
10 minutes       Converging evidence for diagnosis
15 minutes       Available Tools and resources
20 minutes       Caregiver Interview and practice
20 minutes       Dynamic Assessment and practice
10 minutes       Questions and discussion


1256
10:00 am - 11:30 am
Adult SLP    |   S24

Cognitive Rehabilitation Then and Now: What have We Learned in the Last Three Decades?  Part 2

McKay Moore Sohlberg, PhD, University of Oregon

Cognitive rehabilitation after brain injury is a complicated clinical undertaking that requires diverse knowledge and skills in the areas of cognitive processing, physical states, and psychosocial functioning, as well as behavior change and adaptation. Additionally, many different professional disciplines provide cognitive rehabilitation services, each with their own conceptual frameworks and practice methods. Together this has created a “black box” with inconsistent delivery and challenges in explaining the work to funders and other stakeholders. This presentation explores the progress that has occurred in the field over the last 30 years and reviews updates in our conceptualization and models of rehabilitation and applies them to three different treatment approaches.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe the Plan Implement & Evaluate (PIE) and Rehabilitation Treatment Specification System (RTSS) as applied to cognitive rehabilitation
  • Identify the key components of person-centered collaborative goal setting
  • Describe psychological mindedness practices that enhance working alliance, client engagement and psychoeducation
  • Describe treatment ingredients and the PIE process for; metacognitive strategy instruction, external aid training, use of attention drills (brain training)

Level of Learning: Intermediate


1267
10:00 am - 11:30 am
Audiology    |   S25

Living Well With Hearing Loss for Underserved Arizonans

Kate Helms- Tillery, PhD, CCC-SLP, Arizona State University
Aparna Rao, PhD, Arizona State University

In Arizona, approximately 200,000 adults lack access to hearing health care.  Untreated hearing loss is linked with social isolation, depression, and cognitive decline. Adults with untreated hearing loss experience difficulty communicating with their health providers, and face higher risks of hospitalization. Comprehensive hearing intervention has been shown to mitigate these negative effects. Access to comprehensive hearing health care includes not only diagnostic testing and appropriate amplification, but also personalized training to help individuals reach their communication goals. In this presentation, we will discuss a model we have developed and implemented at Arizona State University, which involves interprofessional collaboration between audiologists and speech-language pathologists. We will begin with an exploration of the concept of “living well” with hearing loss in the context of overall health.  Next we will present a life span approach to personalizing intervention, and summarize known variables affecting living well with hearing loss. Our intervention involves working with individual clients to identify their listening and communication goals, and then tailoring training to meet their unique needs.  Participants will practice setting goals and planning intervention based on case studies. The presentation will include a combination of didactic and interactive learning activities.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe the elements of comprehensive hearing health care.
  • Identify personalized communication and listening goals for individuals with hearing loss.
  • Develop personalized intervention plans for individuals with hearing loss.

Level of Learning: Intermediate


1268
1:00 pm - 2:30 pm
Multi Interest    |   S26

Supervising the Students of Today: Facing the Future Together (Supervision)

Kathleen R. Cazzato, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, University of Arizona
Karen Guilmette, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Arizona
Janet L. Hawley, ClinScD, CCC-SLP, University of Arizona
Natalie Monahan, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Arizona

The quality of the supervisory-student relationship is key to the success of the graduate clinicians’ professional growth and learning. Understanding your graduate student including their values, motivations, learning styles, and expectations will facilitate your ability to optimize this relationship and thus the outcomes of the practicum experience. We will share in-depth information about the demographics of today’s students including characteristics that are unique to the Gen Z generation, special attributes of ‘mature’ students, the diverse nature of our student populations, and the increasing role mental health plays in the learning process. Delving into the unique perspective and potential contributions of these individuals will help us better understand them and welcome them as they join us as colleagues in the work force and we FACE the FUTURE together.

Learning Objectives: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe key characteristics, values, and learning styles of our current graduate student cohorts in the post-Covid landscape.
  • Identify implications for these characteristics for student performance and the supervisory relationship in externship settings.
  • Describe at least three specific supervisory practices that may optimize student learning and foster independence in the clinical externship setting.

Level of Learning:  Intermediate

Time Ordered Agenda

10 minutes         Introduction to speakers and topic
30 minutes         The demographics currently in graduate school and implications for clinical education
10 minutes         Breakout activity
20 minutes         Suggestions to promote success during clinical externships
15 minutes         Breakout activity
10 minutes         Conclusions and questions


1269
1:00 pm - 2:30 pm
Multi-Interest   |   S27

Social Learning Differences in Neurodiverse Adolescents: Establishing EBP Through a Capstone Research Project

Darrell Dern, SLPD, CCC-SLP, Rocky Mountain University

This presentation provides current research findings to practicing clinicians regarding methodologies that support neurodiverse adolescents with social learning differences. It will offer insight into the evidence-based treatment frameworks, social metacognitive strategies, activities, and tools used to enhance observation of the social world and understanding and valuing dimensions of self. Additionally, it will foster discussion on how this intervention may be an effective and evidence-based tool to provide neurodiverse individuals with strategies to navigate the social world. Offered by a speech-language pathologist with extensive experience with neurodiverse individuals and currently working in high school-based practice, it will enable clinicians to engage in thought-provoking conversations about evidence-based practices.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Identify key aspects of social learning characteristics of neurotypical and neurodiverse adolescents.
  • Explain the methodologies of Social Thinking ® and Self-Concept Framework that form the foundation of a novel and evidence based intervention for building accurate sense of self in neurodiverse adolescents.
  • Recognize the effect of the novel intervention on accurate sense of self as demonstrated by the empirical study.

Level of Learning: Intermediate


12321:00 pm - 2:30 pm
Adult SLP    |   S28

Moving Onward and Downward in VFSS: The Importance of Evaluating the Entire Swallowing Continuum

Jessica Gregor, BCS-S, CCC-SLP, MS, Mayo Clinic

The swallowing continuum spans the lips to the stomach and comprises interrelated physiologic components of the oropharynx, airway, and esophagus. Due to the intimate interconnectivity, these components can influence one another during the swallowing process, causing upstream and/or downstream effects. Oropharyngeal and esophageal swallowing impairments frequently occur simultaneously, with up to 60% or more of patients referred for VFSS having an esophageal component (Gullung et al., 2012; Miles et al., 2015; Watts et al., 2019). A multidisciplinary team of specialists is ideal for optimal diagnostics and intervention of persons with dysphagia. Specialists, including SLPs, caring for persons with dysphagia must understand the complexity of this interplay, along with its inherent diagnostic and treatment implications.  Therefore, it is imperative for SLPs ensure that the videofluoroscopic swallowing evaluation includes visualization of the esophagus and employ a validated protocol.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • List three interrelationships between the oropharynx and esophagus.
  • Identify rationale for assessing the entire swallowing continuum under fluoroscopy.
  • Describe the value of videofluoroscopic swallowing studies, standardization practices, and multidisciplinary collaboration in dysphagia diagnostics.

Level of Learning: Intermediate


1270
1:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Audiology    |   S29

University of Arizona Advocacy for AHCCCS Coverage of Hearing Devices/Services for Adults

Thomas Muller, AuD, CCC-A, University of Arizona
Erica Hansen, AuD, CCC-A, University of Arizona
Amy Wheeler, AuD, CCC-A, University of Arizona

Arizona’s Medicaid program, the Arizona Healthcare Cost Containment System (AHCCCS) does not cover hearing aids, cochlear implants, aural rehabilitation or related audiology services for adults over age 21 and under age 65.  This leaves low-income, working-age adults in Arizona uncovered and with limited resources for hearing loss management.  Students and faculty are interested in advocating for legislative change that would create coverage for this population beyond initial exams.  Clinical faculty will provide an update on the research and tools they have been developing for this purpose.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Identify the barriers to hearing aids, cochlear implants, and related audiogic services for Arizonan's with limited income
  • Estimate the number of Arizonan's with hearing loss impacted by these barriers
  • Explain the ways in which they can help support the lobbying efforts anticipated.

Level of Learning:  Intermediate


1271
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
Audiology    |   S30

Interdisciplinary Approach to Vestibular Audiology Evaluation and Physical Therapy Management

Haley Lanoue, AuD, CCC-A, Washington University in St. Louis

A case study highlighting the benefits of an interdisciplinary approach to vestibular evaluation and management of dizzy patients. Cases to include examples of vestibular audiology testing at various timepoints within the patient’s rehabilitation process, including physical therapy treatment and Otology evaluation and medical management. These cases will emphasize the overall benefits of vestibular audiologists working closely with vestibular physical therapists, especially in the care of complex multifactorial causes of dizziness, and education on the benefits and limitations of rehabilitative physical therapy.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • List at least two etiologies/symptom profiles of patients who are good candidates for Physical Therapy vestibular rehabilitation.
  • List at least one etiology/symptom profile of a patient who is not likely to benefit from Physical Therapy vestibular rehabilitation.
  • Identify at least two indications a patient should be referred for further audiologic, medical, and/or physical therapy workup when seen for initial hearing/audiometric testing.

Level of Learning: Intermediate


1230
3:00 am - 4:30 am
Pediatric SLP    |   S31

AAC in Arizona- What is the process?

Danika Stampfel, CCC-SLP, ArSHA AAC Committee/ NAU AAC Evaluation and Training Program
Jeremy Legaspi, ArSHA AAC Committee / PRC-Saltillo
Kristy Gibson, ArSHA AAC Committee/ Tobii Dynavox
Rui Hernandez, ArSHA AAC Committee
Michelle Raymond, ArSHA AAC Committee

AAC is a language intervention approach that honors multiple modalities of communication for persons with complex communication needs. (Beukelman & Mirenda, 2012; Johnston et al., 2012; Romski & Sevcik, 1996). In 2020 the process for obtaining personal AAC devices through the Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD) changed to a managed care model. While the process has changed, the need for AAC has not changed. Personal AAC devices purchased through DDD and or private insurance, provide access to communication everywhere. During this presentation, we, your ArSHA AAC Committee will describe the process for obtaining a personal AAC device in Arizona as well as provide several resources for checking out devices, and use in treatment sessions. Bring your AAC questions for solutions and more!

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Discuss pertinent AAC documentation for medical justification
  • Explain steps in the new AAC referral process
  • Identify three resources for AAC evaluation process
  • Identify and describe one strategy for implementation or trial of an AAC device

Level of Learning: Introductory


1218
3:00 pm - 4:30 pm
Multi-Interest    |   S32

Myofunctional Disorders and Anklyoglossia - What Speech Therapists Need to Know

Joy Leslie, MS, CCC-SLP, Private Practice

Myofunctional therapy is research-based and has an important role to play as SLPs and SLPAs work to remediate articulation errors. Our clients often demonstrate open mouth posture, tongue tie, frontal/lateral lisps, and stubborn /r/ errors – let’s take a closer look at the oral structures and function behind these problems! Myofunctional therapy can help clients improve nasal breathing, lip closure, tongue retraction, and open bite/overbite. Learn what to look for, how to incorporate myo into your current therapy sessions, and how to discuss these topics with parents. Discussion will include tethered oral tissues (lip tie, tongue tie) and their impact on tongue position at rest, range of motion, and precision of movement during speech.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Identify three symptoms of a myofunctional disorder.
  • Describe three oral motor exercises that could be used to address correct oral rest posture.
  • Explain the impact of tethered oral tissues on speech production.

Level of Learning: Intermediate


1217
3:00 pm - 4:30 pm
Multi-Interest    |   S33

My 50-year Journey with Apraxia in Adults and Children.

Barbara Dabul, PhD, Private Practice

The speaker contributed to a paradigm shift early in her career from apraxia as a linguistic deficit to apraxia as a motor speech disorder. In today's presentation, she will share her 50 years of experience in assessing and treating apraxia, and she will provide practical tools for therapy, including ten common elements for successful treatment of apraxia in both adults and children, as well as a cueing hierarchy for use by SLPs, other professionals, and family members for maximum success in communicating with persons with apraxia.  Participatory exercises will be provided to participants, with a goal of helping them to understand what it feels like to have apraxia. Identification of apraxia and assessment tools will then be described, including the rationale behind the speaker's published test, The Apraxia Battery for Adults.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • List three of the ten common elements described for successful treatment of apraxia, and current treatments which would incorporate those elements.
  • Provide a cueing hierarchy for maximal assistance by SLPs, other professionals, and parents to apraxic adults and children who are attempting to speak clearly and accurately.
  • State five of the 15 behaviors important for any assessment of apraxia, to differentiate it from other disorders.
  • Share a short two-person exercise to understand the difficlties and challenges of apraxia.

Level of Learning: Introductory


1272
3:00 pm - 4:30 pm
Audiology    |   S34

Grand Rounds

Nancy Flores, AuD, CCC-A, Barrow ENT and Skull Base Surgery, Dignity Health
Linda Norrix, PhD, CCC-A, University of Arizona Speech, Language, & Hearing Clinics
Jennie Mollerup Wagner, AuD, CCC-A, Deer Valley Unified School District

Topic 1:  Sound Perspectives: Exploring Candidacy and Treatment Options for Single-Sided Deafness

Single-sided deafness (SSD) poses significant challenges to individuals, affecting their ability to localize sounds, understand speech in noisy environments and maintain balanced hearing perception. This abstract presents a comprehensive program aimed at addressing SSD, focusing on candidate selection criteria and diverse treatment strategies. This presentation explores various treatment modalities available for SSD, including conventional hearing aids, bone-anchored hearing devices and cochlear implants. Each modality's advantages, limitations and candidacy criteria are examined, providing clinical insights into personalized treatment selection. These treatment selections offer promising avenues for improving speech intelligibility, spatial hearing and overall quality of life for individuals with SSD.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Define the impact of SSD on individuals' auditory capabilities: how SSD affects sound localization, speech perception in noisy environments and overall hearing perception balance, thereby appreciating the challenges faced by individuals with SSD.
  • Describe candidate selection criteria for SSD interventions.
  • Show proficiency in evaluating and comparing treatment modalities for SSD.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Topic 2:  It Takes a TEAM: Newly Identified Sensorineural Hearing Loss in a Preschool Child

A preschool child did not pass her school hearing screening. Challenges for this child’s hearing healthcare included: obtaining a diagnostic hearing evaluation, performing the diagnostic hearing evaluation, finding and receiving appropriate treatment. However, she also had a second set of challenges: not speaking her audiologist’s first language and cultural differences, a changing citizenship status, parents needing help with insurance/financial need. Several audiologists, students and community members teamed up to provide support to this child and her family. The child was eventually diagnosed with a bilateral mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss. She was fit with hearing aids and plans for aural rehabilitation and education were made. This case illustrates some of the many ways audiologists provide health literacy and social support when providing hearing health care. The importance of the connections made with patients and their families and the interconnections with colleagues, professionals and community organizations is emphasized.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Formulate a plan for a diagnostic hearing evaluation for a preschooler with language/linguistic differences who has a “likely” bilateral sensorineural hearing loss.
  • Describe at least two things to consider when providing audiologic rehabilitation services for a preschooler with a newly-identified hearing loss.
  • Describe how best-case healthcare teams can be created.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Topic 3:  Cochlear Implant, English Language Learner, Functional Listening Evaluation – A Case Study

A case study: a student coming to our school district from Taiwan who is a user of bilateral cochlear implants. Discussion will center on the challenges that he faces and how the Functional Listening Evaluation has helped us in designing specialized instruction for him.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe the Functional Listening Evaluation (FLE)
  • State where to get more information about the FLE
  • Define FLE and why should it be included in our “tool kit.”

Level of Learning: Introductory

 

Friday, April 12  

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
SP1  |   Audiology

Deciding Factors in Selecting a Career Path in Educational Audiology

Natasha Seaton, AuD, CCC-A, FAAA, University of Arizona and Happy Ears Hearing Center
Linda Norrix, CCC-A, PhD, The University of Arizona and  Tucson Medical Center
Aileen Wong, AuD, CCC-A, The University of Arizona
Nicole Marrone, CCC-A, PhD, The University of Arizona

Educational Audiologists are health-related professionals who specialize in prevention, identification, and treatment of hearing loss for children 3 years of age to 21 in the school system. Given that they play a critical role in ensuring the success of deaf and hard of hearing students, the Educational Audiology Association (EAA) and the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) recommend a ratio of one educational audiologist per 10,000 school children. Despite this recommendation, no state currently meets this ratio, and many far exceed the recommendation. Recognizing there may be a possible shortage of educational audiologists, this project focused on creating a survey designed to identify what factors persuade or dissuade audiologists from pursuing a career as educational audiologists. The survey was distributed electronically to audiologists and audiology externs. Outcomes of this research provide insights into perceived factors that motivate and deter individuals from a career in educational audiology. From our findings, we also will share possible recommendations for recruiting professionals into a career in educational audiology.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe two perceived factors that motivate individuals to become educational audiologists.
  • Describe two perceived factors that may deter individuals from becoming educational audiologists.
  • Identify one or more possible recommendations for recruiting new educational audiologists.

SP2   |   Multi-Interest

Dysphagia Care in Rural Arizona: Perspectives, Barriers, and Opportunities

Sara Monti, CCC-SLP, MS, Summit Healthcare Regional Medical Center
Tifani Wilhelm, CCC-SLP, CLC, Summit Healthcare Regional Medical Center
Julia Watson, CCC-SLP, MS, Summit Healthcare Regional Medical Center

Rural populations across the United States have experienced long-standing health disparities that distinguish their experiences from those of their urban counterparts, including reduced life expectancy, poorer health outcomes, higher incidences of disease, and reduced access to healthcare. Despite these common themes, rural communities are varied, diverse, and, for many of them, understudied. Data regarding the incidence and prevalence of dysphagia and access to dysphagia services in rural communities nationwide is sparse, and particularly so for the Southwestern United States. In an effort to address this gap in the literature, this poster session will use the Arizona White Mountains region as a case study and use it as a lens through which to examine broader trends associated with rural dysphagia and feeding services. Pertaining to both the acute care and outpatient settings, geographic dispersion; population trends and migration patterns; healthcare workforce; access and infrastructure; clinical pathway challenges; and post-COVID era changes will be discussed. Finally, in sharing the unique barriers and opportunities faced with expanding service lines and the various possibilities for incorporating rural health care into graduate training programs, it is hoped that the increased awareness will support both development of well-rounded professionals and ongoing improvement to dysphagia and feeding care access in rural areas.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe the burden of disease for dysphagia in the White Mountains region and rural Arizona more broadly
  • Identify infrastructure, expertise, population, and clinical pathway challenges facing rural Arizona’s access to dysphagia care
  • List three resources or strategies for improving rural healthcare access to dysphagia services
  • Integrate the information to support dysphagia service expansion in the rural Arizona setting

SP3   |   Adult SLP

Early Cognitive-Communication Therapy for Adults With mTBI/Concussion and Persistent Symptoms

Chloe Baker, Northern Arizona University

Five adults approximately one month post-mild TBI/concussion participated in early, weekly cognitive-communication therapy. All described persistent symptoms related to the injury, and reported that therapy was beneficial in recovery. Results showed improvements on the Awareness Questionnaire following treatment.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe the importance of early cognitive-communication therapy.
  • Identify benefits reported by patients with Persistent Symptoms.
  • Describe the unique needs of each client with mild traumatic brain injury.

SP4    |   Adult SLP

Perceived Strengths and Limitations of Telepractice for Persons With Aphasia

Rosa Stewart, BA, Northern Arizona University
Emi Isaki, PhD, CCC-SLP, Northern Arizona University

Telepractice is a form of service delivery used by speech-language pathologists (SLPs) to screen, assess, and provide intervention to persons with aphasia (PWA). During COVID-19, telepractice became mandatory following social distancing guidelines. Little is known about how caregivers to PWA and SLPs feel about telepractice aphasia therapy. A questionnaire was provided to caregivers of PWA and clinicians to determine the perceived strengths and limitations of using telepractice. Results will add to the literature on the feasibility and efficacy of this modality of therapy.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Identify perceived strengths and limitations of telepractice aphasia therapy from SLPs.
  • Identify perceived strengths and limitations of telepractice aphasia therapy from caregivers of PWA.
  • Discuss clinical implication of these results.

 SP5   |   Adult SLP

The Effects of Multiple mTBI in Adults and Possible CTE

Allie Lopez, BA, Northern Arizona University
Alexia Leon, BA, Northern Arizona University
Emi Isaki, PhD, CCC-SLP, Northern Arizona University

Ninety plus adult participants reported their history for mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Although reports of injuries were subjective, a high number of mTBI was indicated. Based on the athletic literature, similar concerns for Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) occur in the general population. The clinician should consider the possibility of CTE if future dementia occurs after multiple mTBIs. Currently, the field of speech-language pathology does not have standards of best-practice for CTE.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe the number of mTBIs in the general population.
  • Explain the prevalence of CTE with multiple mTBIs.
  • Discuss the possible association of CTE and multiple mTBIs.

SP6    |   Adult SLP

High-Flow Nasal Cannula and Swallowing in Hospitalized Inpatients

Cintamani Ellsworth, CCC-SLP, Northern Arizona University and Northern Arizona Healthcare
Emi Isaki, PhD, Northern Arizona University

The purpose of this study was to examine swallowing outcomes, including overall level of swallowing dysfunction and presence of aspiration and silent aspiration, in hospitalized patients receiving a form of supplemental oxygen known as High Flow Nasal Cannula (HFNC).  This is a single center, within subjects, retrospective study of 21 hospitalized inpatients who underwent Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (FEES) while receiving supplemental oxygen via HFNC. Subjects had their swallowing evaluated a minimum of two times. At least once with FEES while on HFNC and at least once with FEES or a Modified Barium Swallow (MBS) study when on low-flow oxygen or room air.   When patients were on HFNC, their overall swallowing function on FEES was rated as significantly more impaired (Z = -3.439, p< 0.001) than when they were on low-flow oxygen or room air. Additionally, it was found during FEES that the odds of having an aspiration event for those on HFNC were 5.2 the odds of having an aspiration event when not on HFNC  (OR 5.2, 95% CI: 1.36-19.77 p=0.0156). Findings related to silent aspiration were not significant.  The results of this study indicate that HFNC is a factor that should be considered when determining if a patient is appropriate for oral alimentation. Given the limited data on HFNC and swallowing function, and the fragility of this population, instrumental examination of swallowing prior to initiation of oral intake is prudent.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe gaps in the current literature related to High Flow Nasal Cannula and swallowing.
  • Identify mechanisms by which critically ill hospitalized patients are at risk for dysphagia.
  • Discuss one way that the results of this study could be incorporated into clinical practice.

 SP7    |   Pediatric SLP

Support Needs of Autistic Adult Females in Higher Education

Sydney Stone, BS, Midwestern University
Schea Fissel, PhD, Midwestern University

Many neurodiverse females enter college undiagnosed, misdiagnosed, or seeking a medical diagnosis, which limits their access to academic accommodations, but also to knowledge of their own identity, disability, and strengths. These limitations constrain neurodiverse females’ self-determinacy, which is needed to seek accommodations, find mentorship, self-advocate, or access supportive membership in various communities and care-networks. Many are left to navigate the social landscape of academia alone, resulting in feelings of isolation, academic failure, or drop out. This presentation reports the results of a nation-wide survey that asked neurodiverse females enrolled in college to report their preferences for social support in higher education. These survey results are grounded within the lived experiences of two neurodiverse SLP students, who report their experiences and support preferences.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe the experiences of adult autistic females.
  • Describe the support needs of adult autistic females.
  • Explain the identity of adult autistic females.
  • List ways to support positive identity in adult autistic females.

SP8   |   Adult SLP

Bilingual Cognition Following Brain Injury and Implications for Reading Performance

Moyi Chang, BS, Arizona State University
Ileana Ratiu, PhD, Arizona State University

Brain injuries impact multiple cognitive functions such as attention, memory, and higher-level executive functions. These abilities are necessary for complex skills, such as reading comprehension. Executive function skills are also critical for language processing in bilingual individuals. Studies have shown that individuals with traumatic brain injuries perform worse on measures of reading than control participants, especially when reading requires inferencing. Further, evidence has shown that bilingual individuals with acquired brain injury may be impacted differently than monolingual individuals. The current study examined reading comprehension in bilingual and monolingual individuals with and without a history of traumatic brain injury under varying reading conditions. Performance was measured using both behavioral (e.g., reading time, accuracy) and physiological (e.g., eye movements) methodologies. Those with traumatic brain injuries reported significantly worse cognitive symptoms and showed subtle deficits in reading comprehension compared to controls. Consistent with prior studies, bilingual individuals’ performance on the reading comprehension task was more impacted by traumatic brain injury than monolingual performance. Interestingly, eye movement measures were more sensitive to group differences in performance than behavioral measures alone. These findings inform tailored intervention approaches to support reading comprehension skills in individuals with traumatic brain injury.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Explain two consequences of traumatic brain injury related to reading comprehension.
  • Learners will identify differences in self-reported cognitive symptoms and reading performance between monolingual and bilingual individuals with and without traumatic brain injury.
  • Learners will explain the clinical implications of reading comprehension deficits following an traumatic brain injury.

SP9    |   Pediatric SLP

The Effect of Using Social Thinking® and The Self-Concept Framework Methodologies on Accurate Sense of Self in Neurodiverse Adolescents

Darrell Dern, SLPD, CCC-SLP, Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions
Brooks Peters, PhD, Forsyth County School
Nancy Clements, CCC-SLP, Social Thinking® Boston
Nancy Cotton, PhD, Social Thinking Boston®

This poster presentation provides current research findings to practicing clinicians regarding methodologies that support neurodiverse adolescents with social learning differences. It will offer insight into the treatment frameworks, social metacognitive strategies, activities, and tools used to enhance observation of the social world and understanding and valuing dimensions of self. Additionally, it will foster discussion on how this intervention may be an effective tool to provide neurodiverse individuals with strategies to navigate the social world. Offered by a speech-language pathologist with extensive experience with neurodiverse individuals and currently working in high school-based practice, it will enable clinicians to engage in thought-provoking conversations about evidence-based practices.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Integrate knowledge and information from the literature about psychosocial development milestones, the factors related to a healthy sense of self, and the experiences and demands that high school has on neurodiverse adolescent’s sense of self.

  • Apply the research findings and determine if an integrated intervention utilizing Social Thinking® and The Self-Concept Framework methodologies may affect neurodiverse adolescents’ accurate sense of self and observations of the social world.

  • Support clinicians supporting adolescents with social learning differences using evidence-based practices across community and school-based practices.


SP10    |   Multi-Interest

The Effect of Aging on Vowel Production

Brooklyn Jones, BA, Northern Arizona University
Benjamin Tucker, PhD, Northern Arizona University

Various researchers have sought to get a better understanding of how aging influences speech production. While reduction, like producing [dʒitˀjɛt] for did you eat yet? is a normal process in spontaneous speech production, there is limited knowledge of the relationship between aging and vowel reduction or even how aging effects a speaker's vowel space. Speech disorders, such as dysarthria, can result in reduced articulatory movements that are similar to the speech reduction described earlier. Thus, it is important to investigate, as individuals age, the typical use of reduced speech. The researchers transcribed and forced-aligned read speech and spontaneous speech produced by 18 younger (17-31) and 13 older speakers (64-79). Then, extracted formant values for the stressed vowels in the read and spontaneous speech to investigate differences in vowel space. The results of this study would further support the understanding of reduction in spontaneous speech and how changes in vowel space differ in dysarthric and non-dysarthric speakers.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Described vowel space changes throughout the aging process.
  • Identify vowel space changes throughout the aging process.
  • Discuss the clinical implications of these results.

SP11    |   Pediatric SLP

The Language Delay Associated with Chromosome 12Q24.31-33 Deletion and Its Impact on Those Individuals and Their Caregivers: A Case Study.

Emily McKenney, BA, A.T. Still University
Ekaterina Bruno CCC-SLP, MEd, Research Advisor, A.T. Still  University

There is limited research on the topic of Chromosome 12Q24.31-33 deletion in addition to a language delay associated within it (Al-Zahrani et al., 2011). Chromosome 12Q24.31-33 deletion is characterized by short stature, heart defects, speech and language delays, and an association within autism. Language progress may be slower in this population and the treatment might be different from the traditional approach (Law et al., 2005). Considering the lack of research about language delay, Speech-Language Pathology intervention, and data on quality of life in individuals with Chromosome 12Q24.31-33 deletion, there's a great need to at least start addressing these issues.   This case study investigates effects of Speech-Language Pathology intervention for language delay in an individual diagnosed with Chromosome 12Q24.31-33 deletion and an impact on the quality of life of this individual and their caregivers. The lead investigator conducted a survey of past and present Speech-Language Pathologists that have worked with this individual and used the Quality of Life Scale to determine potential effects on the quality of life of the individual with Chromosome 12Q24.31-33 deletion and their caregivers. The case study contributes to the existing literature and helps to expand knowledge and data on this rare condition.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe the need for research in language delay and intervention in individuals with Chromosoeme 12Q24.31-33 deletion.
  • Explain how language treatment may be different in individuals with Chromosome 12Q24.31-33 deletion.
  • Explain how langauge delay may effect the quality of life in individuals with Chromosome 12Q24.31-33 deletion and their caregivers.

SP12    |   Pediatric SLP

Marhabla Dialecti: Social Media Resource for Current and Aspiring SLPs

Christine Abassi, BS, Midwestern University
Nancy Lira, BA, Midwestern University
Melissa Pierce-Rivera, PhD , CCC-SLP, Midwestern University

Background: Research has shown that speech-language pathologists lack the confidence to treat and evaluate students from diverse backgrounds. For current and aspiring speech-language pathologists (SLPs) to provide efficient services to bilingual and multicultural students, they must be aware of dialectal and cultural differences within and between diverse languages and cultures. Limited resources are available about other languages and cultures to this level of detail. Method: We created a pediatric-focused social media resource (Instagram account) to inform current and aspiring SLPs about Spanish and Arabic dialects and the cultures that use them. We collected quantitative data from Instagram user analytics and used thematic analysis to describe the nature of user comments on the posts. Results: We published sixteen posts across 8 weeks, covering four distinct dialects of Spanish and four of Arabic. Followers and non-followers of the account engaged 381 times with posts covering cultural considerations and linguistic features. Instagram analytics showed primarily female users in the United States, Jordan, India, and Indonesia in addition to specific cities across a diverse range of ages. Qualitative analysis revealed that users found the posts valuable and applicable to their own clinical practice.    Conclusion: There is a need for accessible resources for SLPs to learn about specific dialects and cultural characteristics associated with speakers of different languages. By utilizing social media platforms such as Instagram, SLPs can efficiently and effectively disseminate helpful information to SLPs to support more culturally sensitive diagnoses and treatment.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe cultural considerations for work with children from at least three distinct groups of Spanish or Arabic speakers.
  • Describe linguistic characteristics (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics) of at least three distinct groups of Spanish or Arabic speakers.
  • Identify the benefits of recognizing dialectal and cultural differences for appropriate assessment and intervention with children.

SP13    |   Multi-Interest

Correlation Between Previous SLPA Experience and Graduate Student Clinical Skills

Jessica Poet, BS, Midwestern University
Jessie Lind, BA, Midwestern University
Danielle Reed, CCC-SLP, Midwestern University

Background: This study investigates the preparedness of graduate students in Speech-Language Pathology (SLP), comparing those with prior experience as Speech-Language Pathology Assistants (fSLPAs) to those without such experience (nSLPAs). Method: The aim is to discern significant differences in their readiness and correlations between the work settings of fSLPAs (e.g., home health, private practice, school-based, or telehealth) and their clinical readiness. A 19-question survey was developed and distributed online to 108 respondents, including 33 fSLPAs and 75 nSLPAs, ensuring anonymity and following ethical guidelines.  Results: Quantitative analysis revealed a medium effect size for self-confidence in pediatric clinical abilities among fSLPAs (d = .574) and a large effect size for the question that students with prior SLPA experience are more successful in graduate school (d = 1.302). Other effect sizes were small or nonexistent. The results indicate that the majority of fSLPAs had pediatric experience before graduate school, contributing to reported confidence and the observed effect size. However, confirmation bias may influence the higher confidence levels in fSLPAs regarding their success in graduate school.  Conclusions: The findings underscore the potential impact of SLPA experience on clinical readiness, particularly in pediatric settings. Further research is needed to explore whether fSLPAs can attribute their success in graduate school to their prior field experience.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Identify if there is confirmation bias in the confidence of fSLPA's in graduate school.
  • Discuss possible reasons for improved confidence of fSLPAs vs. nSLPAs (i.e., previous work settings, time in the field, etc.)
  • Discuss fSLPA confidence in pediatric clinical settings when compared to nSLPA graduate students.

 SP14   |   Adult SLP

SLP Graduate Student Preparedness in Providing Care to Transgender Individuals

Ashley Mixon, BA, A.T. Still University
Ivonne Maldonado De la Rosa, PhD, Research Advisor, A.T. Still University

Transgender voice services are an important form of gender affirmation care that addresses the voice and speech aspects of communication to reflect one's gender identity and or gender expression. As more transgender individuals seek out services from speech-language pathologists (SLPs), the need for improving culturally competent and responsive care is imperative. It is expected that SLP’s provide expertise in modifying the voice and other aspects of communication, while also demonstrating appropriate, inclusive, respectful, and competent care. The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) recognizes the importance and impact in providing services to transgender individuals and states that transgender individuals may seek gender affirmation services to make their voice and/or gender expression congruent with their gender identity and/ or gender expression. However, it has been generally found that very few clinicians have received training in  providing services to the transgender population. This project aims to investigate the preparedness and knowledge of SLP graduate students in providing voice treatment to transgender individuals and the factors that influence their preparedness and knowledge.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Identify the need for Transgender voice services
  • List factors that influence a graduate students preparedness
  • Prepare future clinicians in providing services to transgender clients

SP15    |   Pediatric SLP

Identifying Pediatric Feeding Disorders in Children Birth to Five

Cynthia Farrell, CCC-SLP, Northern Arizona University
Grace Flynn, BA, Northern Arizona University
Elana Hirschkatz, BS, Northern Arizona University

The purpose of this poster is to increase awareness of pediatric feeding and swallowing screening “red flags”, both in case history information and clinical observations. Incidence rates of Pediatric Feeding Disorder (PFD) have been steadily increasing with the prevalence being 1 in 37 children under the age of five in the United States (Kovicic, et al., 2020). As healthcare is improving, survival rates are also increasing for medically fragile infants and PFDs are becoming more prevalent (Homer, 2015). These children with swallowing disorders are “showing up” in the schools and communities with safety risks for eating and drinking activities, causing schools and communities to be more liable (Arvedson, 2020). Early identification of children who have PFD is important to support their health, developmental, psychological, and learning readiness.  Therefore, there is a need for interprofessionals to utilize effective screening procedures in the area of pediatric feeding disorders.  Many screeners exist to identify children with PFDs, such as the Infant and Child Feeding Questionnaire (ICFQ) (Barkmeier-Kraemer et al, 2017) and the Pedi Eat. (Thoyre et al, 2014).  However, members of the child’s interprofessional team, including the caregiver, need increased awareness and training to utilize these tools to help with early detection of PFD. This poster will present evidence-based signs and symptoms of PFD to facilitate use of these screening tools and appropriate referrals to the feeding specialist on the child’s interprofessional team.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • List feeding and swallowing red flags for all practice settings.
  • Describe the importance of early identification with PFD.
  • Provide a list of screening procedures and tools to assist with early detection of PFD.

SP16   |   Audiology

Advocating for Hearing Healthcare: A Large-Scale Student Group Project

Erica Hansen , AuD, University of Arizona
Kayli Boyles, BS, University of Arizona
Rosemary Bramlett, BS, University of Arizona
Bryanne Crump, BS, University of Arizona
Grace Lavine, BS, University of Arizona
Brianna Robillard, BS, University of Arizona
Danielle Robillard, BS, University of Arizona
Abbie White, BS, University of Arizona
Nicole Marrone, Ph.D, University of Arizona
Tom Muller, AuD, University of Arizona
Linda Norrix, PhD, University of Arizona
David Velenovsky, PhD, University of Arizona
Amy Wheeler, AuD, University of Arizona
Aileen Wong, AuD, University of Arizona

Presently, there are limited resources to support adults with hearing loss who have low-income in Arizona. This is in part because Arizona is one of twenty-one states in the United States that do not have hearing health coverage through Medicaid. In response, 7 doctor of audiology students at the University of Arizona, along with 9 faculty members, are working on a multi-semester project to study access to hearing healthcare care for this population to be completed in Spring 2024. As part of these efforts, a tool was developed to compare 50 state and 6 country models for diagnosis, follow-up, counseling, hearing aids, replacements/repairs, and aural rehabilitation. Based on these findings, a proposed model for coverage of hearing services and hearing devices for adults under Arizona’s Medicaid was created. Anticipated utilization and cost of implementing the program was carefully estimated. Additionally, a summary of the literature regarding the personal and financial costs of untreated hearing loss is being drafted. The students visited the state capitol and met with legislators this spring. Upcoming efforts will include proposed initiatives to mobilize stakeholders, such as patient groups and professional hearing organizations.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Compare existing models for providing hearing healthcare to adults with low-income and learn about the vast differences that occur.
  • Describe our proposed Arizona model for the future and its rationale.
  • Identify information and advocacy efforts that may be transferable to other states attempting a similar objective.
  • Discuss how collaboration can move audiologists and speech language pathologists toward a productive future.

SP17   |   Audiology

Evaluating Bone Conduction Thresholds With Various Head Coverings

Tricia Stanley, BS, Student Researcher
Kimberly Skinner, PhD, A.T. Still University

No formal protocol currently exists for bone conduction testing for patients who wear head coverings. We recently surveyed hearing care professionals and found there is wide variety in bone conduction testing practices when patients wear a head covering. Here, we present data comparing bone conduction thresholds measured while wearing a baseball cap, a wig, and a hair scarf compared to baseline thresholds. Considering the cultural and religious diversity in the United States, the results of this study support the development of bone-conduction testing protocols for patients who wear head coverings.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe the instrumentation used in bone conduction.
  • Describe the current guidelines for bone conduction testing.
  • Identify the impact of the head coverings used in this study on bone conduction thresholds.

SP18    |   Pediatric SLP

Breaking Language Barriers: An English-Tagalog Articulation  Informal Assessment

Kazhra Kelcho, BS, A. T. Still University
Ekaterina Bruno, CCC-SLP, MEd, A. T. Still University

The United States is home to a diverse population with over 23% of individuals identifying as bilingual. While Spanish is the most prevalent non-English language spoken in the country, there is a significant presence of Tagalog speakers, especially in Hawaii, Nevada, and California (US Census Bureau, 2020). Despite the growing linguistic diversity of the United States, there is a limited selection of assessment tools for non-English and non-Spanish languages. This imposes on a Speech-Language Pathologist’s (SLP) ability to appropriately evaluate and support bilingual individuals.  In the attempt to bridge this gap, we have developed a bilingual Tagalog/English articulation informal assessment to assist SLPs in identifying potential articulation and phonological disorders in both languages. This tool includes assessment of consonants in initial, medial, and final positions and a connected speech sample in both languages. This allows the clinician to identify articulation and phonological errors and document them in the provided templates. Additionally, we provided an audio recording of the stimulus materials for the clinician's convenience and the visual stimuli if the clinician decides to include a visual component evaluating a child.  This innovative assessment is designed to be culturally sensitive and inclusive of the unique linguistic features of both Tagalog and English. A valuable addition to the currently available resources, this informal assessment empowers SLPs to serve the population of bilingual Tagalog/English speakers effectively and ensure they get the support necessary.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe the limited access to assessment tools for bilingual individuals in languages other than English/Spanish.
  • Recognize the critical need of a bilingual English/Tagalog articulation and phonological assessment to address gaps in SLP services.
  • Describe the benefits of the proposed bilingual English/Tagalog assessment.

This course is offered for up to 1.2 ASHA CEUs (various levels)

The supervision courses (Session 7 and 26) are offered separately for up to 0.3 ASHA CEUs (various levels)

The ethics courses (sessions 16 and 19) are offered separately for up to 0.3 AHSA CEUs (intermediate level)

The DEI courses (Sessions 1, 2, 14 and 23) are offered separately for up to 0.5 ASHA CEUs (intermediate level)


ArSHA is approved by the American Academy of Audiology to offer Academy CEYs for this activity.  The program is worth a maximum of 0.9 CEUs.  Academy approval of this continuing education activity is based on course content only and does not imply endorsement of course content, specific products or clinical procedure, or adherence of the event to the Academy’s Code of Ethics.  Any views that are presented are those of the presenter/CE Provider and not necessarily of the American Academy of Audiology.

 

 

 

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ArSHA Convention - Group Registration Instructions

When professionals from the same workplace/district register to attend Convention together, they are eligible to receive a discounted rate.  Examples of workplace/district are School Districts, Hospitals, Health/Rehab Centers, University Faculty/Staff, Staffing Agencies or Private Practice.

Note:  All registration forms must come in one packet in order to qualify for the Group Discount.  (Please mail these to ArSHA at 700 McKinght Park Drive, Suite 708, Pittsburgh, PA 15237 or email to arsha@arsha.org)  There is no online group registration.

Professional Group Rates – Full Convention

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$235/person – after 3/1/2024

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$175/person – after 3/1/2024

Downloadable program and registration form: https://arsha.org/documents/2024_con/ArSHAConventionBrochure2024-REVISED2.pdf

EL Conquistador Hotel
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Call: 1-888-370-0980

Group Code: ASH411
Rate: $209 plus tax, per night
Cut-Off Date: Reservations must be made by 03/19/24

Reserve a Room at the El Conquistador

Presenters

Highlighted Presenters

Keynote

Tiffany Hines, PhD, CCC-SlP - Utilizing Interprofessional Collaboration in Schools to Promote Cultural Competence

Early Childhood

Nicole Allen, MS, CCC-SlP and Lisa Said, MEdGestalt Language Processors and the Role of Floortime Therapy
Keila Gutierrez, MA, CCC-SlPMultiple Oppositions: Practical Overview, Case Studies, & Clinical Tools

Schools

Marie Ireland, MEd, CCC-SlPEligibility for Speech Sound Disorders and Integrating Research and Regulations
Shelley Gray, PhD, CCC-SlPWorking Memory in Children

Medical

Aubrey Dunlap, MS, CCC-SlP, Natalie Monahan, MS, CCC-SlP, and Denise Stats-Caldwell, MS, CCC-SlPVoice Panel: Complex Cases in Voice in Upper Airway
Jessica Gregor, MS, CCC-SlP, BCS-SMoving Onward and Downward in VFSS: The Importance of Evaluating the Entire Swallowing Continuum
McKay Moore Sohlberg, PhDCognitive Rehabilitation Then and Now: What have We Learned in the Last Three Decades?
Keri Winchester, MS, CCC-SlP & Certified End of Life Doula/Educator – Ethics, Difficult Conversations and End of Life

Multi-interest

Tiffany Hines, PhD, CCC-SLPHarnessing the Power of AI and Designing a Tapestry of Diversity
Darrell Dern, SLPD, CCC-SLPSocial Learning Differences in Neurodiverse Adolescents: Establishing EBP Through a Capstone Research Project
Kathleen R. Cazzato, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, Karen Guilmette, MS, CCC-SLP, Janet Hawley, ClinScD, CCC- SLP, and Natalie Monahan, MS, CCC-SLPSupervising the Students of Today: Facing the Future Together
Teri James Bellis, PhD, CCC-A, FAAA, F-ASHAAssessment of and Intervention for Auditory Processing Deficits in Children
Davis Henderson, PhD, CCC-SLPThe Communication Style and Mannerism of the Navajo People
Jeffery Meeks, CCC-SLP and Vickie Jones, BS, C-SLPASLPA NOW; Professional and Ethical Issues Facing SLPAs and Their Supervisors in Arizona

Audiology

Audiology Grand Rounds - Nancy Flores, AuD, CCC-A, Jennie Mollerup-Wagner, AuD, CCC-A, and Linda Norrix, PhD
Haley Lanoue, AuD, CCC-A Interdisciplinary Approach to Vestibular Audiology Evaluation and Physical Therapy Management
Aparna Rao, PhD and Kate Helms-Tillery, PhD, CCC-SLPLiving Well With Hearing Loss
Bridget Shanahan-Herrick, AuD, PASC, ABAC, FAAA, CCC-A – Pediatric Audiology
Thomas Muller, AuD, CCC-A, Erica Hansen, AuD, CCC-A, and Amy WheelerUniversity of Arizona Advocacy for AHCCCS Coverage of Hearing Devices/ Services for Adults

Program Details

Friday, April 12

1241
8:00 am – 9:00 am
Pediatric SLP    |   S01

Keynote Speaker
Designing a Tapestry of Diversity: Utilizing Interprofessional Collaboration in Schools to Promote Cultural Competence (DEI)

Tiffany Hines, CCC-SLP, PhD, A.T. Still University

This presentation will explore the role of interprofessional collaboration in school-based speech language therapy to foster diversity and inclusion through cultural competence.  Information presented will emphasize the transformative power of collaboration between the SLP and other professionals including occupational therapists, physical therapists, educators, school psychologists, social workers, interpreters, and families in creating an intricate tapestry of support for children with communication disorders from diverse backgrounds. As the student population becomes increasingly diverse, it is essential for SLPs to adopt more inclusive practices that honor and celebrate the unique identities and experiences of their students. It is important to build partnerships with other professionals as well as families of these students to develop a comprehensive and holistic approach to evaluation, diagnosis and intervention.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Identify successful models of interprofessional collaboration,
  • Discuss the significance of open communication, knowledge-sharing, and shared decision-making in assessment and intervention,
  • Discover how collaborative efforts can identify and address co-existing learning challenges, social-emotional factors, and cognitive aspects that impact communication development
  • Explore the critical role of family-centered care in fostering diversity and inclusion

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Time Ordered Agenda

10 minutes       Introduction, disclosures and learning objectives
5 minutes         Defining cultural competence
20 minutes       Building Interprofessional models
10 minutes       Incorporating family-centered care in schools
10 minutes       Actionable steps
5 minutes         Conclusion and Q&A


1242
9:15 am – 10:45 am
Multi-Interest    |   S02

Harnessing the Power of AI (DEI)

Tiffany Hines, CCC-SLP, PhD, A. T. Still University

Alexa, can you help me write this evaluation report? As technology advances, Artificial Intelligence (AI) presents a unique opportunity for SLPs to enhance the quality and efficiency of speech-language evaluations and interventions. In this session, SLPs will discover innovative ways to integrate AI into their therapy practices and discover practical strategies for using AI tools, software, apps, and techniques that address the unique needs of today’s students.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Gain a comprehensive understanding of how AI can be integrated into therapy sessions.
  • Dissect real-world case studies while participating in interactive discussions
  • Attain practical insights and actionable strategies to leverage AI effectively in their school-based speech therapy practices.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Time Ordered Agenda

5 minutes         Introduction, disclosures and learning objectives
20 minutes       AI basics and real world case studies
10 minutes       Interactive AI activity and application
15 minutes       Intergrading AI into Speech-Language therapy
5 minutes         Resource Sharing
5 minutes         Conclusion and Q&A


1212
9:15 am - 10:45 am
Multi-Interest    |   S03

Therapeutic Relationships and Alliances: Common Factors and Speech-Language Pathology

Colin Macpherson, CCC-SLP, Midwestern University

The development of a therapeutic relationship and alliance between the speech-language pathologist (SLP) and client may be essential to positive client outcomes (Ebert & Kohnert, 2010; Sylvestre & Gobeil, 2020). Numerous studies in disciplines of clinical psychology and counseling have addressed the role of "common factors" in the development of a therapeutic alliance. Indeed, the role of the therapeutic alliance is considered to contribute more to clinical outcomes than many empirically supported treatments (Wampold, 2015). If the development of a therapeutic relationship and alliance plays a role in the successful treatment of individuals with communication disorders, it is imperative that we identify "common factors" that SLPs employ to establish and facilitate strong therapeutic relationships and alliances (Ebert & Kohnert, 2010).  The purpose of this seminar will be to acquaint both student and practicing SLPs with the role of common factors in negative and positive client outcomes. Literature from clinical psychology and speech language pathology will be reviewed to improve participant knowledge of how an understanding of "common factors',  therapeutic relationships, and therapeutic alliances may result in improved clinical outcomes for our clients. Participants will also develop their knowledge of various surveys and tools that can be used to develop their skills in employing common factors to achieve successful therapeutic relationships and alliances. Additionally, the adaptation of the contextual model (Wampold, 2015) to speech language pathology will be presented as an alternative to the traditional medical model of evaluation and treatment in speech language pathology.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe the role of the therapeutic relationship and alliance in the treatment of communication disorders.
  • Identify two surveys they can use to enhance their knowledge of personal common factors.
  • Describe the difference between the traditional medical model and the contextual model in the treatment of communication disorders.

Level of Learning: Introductory


1209
9:15 am - 10:45 am
Adult SLP    |   S04

Head and Neck Cancer; A Million-Dollar Diagnosis With Possible Accessories

Carolyn Abraham, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, CLT, Private Clinical Practice

Speech pathologists are often tasked with seeing Head and Neck Cancer Patients with treatment challenges and limitations including dysphagia, xerostomia, trismus, lymphedema and much more. There are many tools available to patients that are on the market; and while some are covered by insurance, many are not. Speech pathologists best serve their patients when they are educated consumers guiding patients through these tools. This presentation will focus on many of the available devices, the pros and cons of these devices, and the application of them to additional patient populations.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe three tools and/or devices available to patients to manage their symptom burden and to treat them effectively.
  • List the pros and cons of the devices available, in addition to cost benefit analysis.
  • Explain how to implement these tools in additional patient populations.

Level of Learning: Intermediate


1216
9:15 am - 10:45 am
Pediatric SLP   |   S05

Partnering With Families to Improve AAC Outcomes

Michelle Raymond, BCS-CL, CCC-SLP, MA, University of Arizona

Barriers to AAC use often include a lack of support for the child within the home and community. Families often feel overwhelmed or unsupported in meeting their child’s needs. Mixed messages from multiple professionals often complicates family involvement. In this session, participants learn about models of care that support families as communication partners and increase family involvement By creating a partnership with families to improve access to AAC for children with complex communication needs, families will increase ownership of AAC across settings.  Participants will learn strategies to address common challenges for lack of involvement and other barriers that decrease use of AAC in the home and communit

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe models of care to improve  AAC use in the home and community.
  • Identify behaviors of adult learners to support AAC use for children in the home.
  • List strategies to address common challenges related to family involvement.

Level of Learning: Intermediate


1260
11:00 am – 12:30 pm
Pediatric SLP   |   S06

Eligibility for Speech Sound Disorders: Integrating Research and Regulations

Marie Ireland, Med, CCC-SLP, Charles Sturt University

Students with Speech Sound Disorders (SSD) make up a large part of SLP caseloads in schools.  Since 2018, newly published data on speech sound acquisition has created questions for many SLPs. Participants will review research in speech sound disorders and the requirements for evaluation and eligibility in schools.   A review of research and evaluation and eligibility resources will be provided. SLPs are encouraged to consider their evaluation and eligibility practices for SSD and subsequent impact on caseloads.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Identify free professional development offerings for both assessment and treatment of speech sound disorders in children.
  • Locate online information on state regulations and guidance to support school based practice.
  • List examples of tools that can be used to evaluate children  and document IDEA requirements for eligibility.

Level of Learning: Intermediate


1215
11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Multi-Interest    |   S07

The ABCs of Supervising Gen Z (Supervision)

Danielle Reed, CCC-SLP, EdD, Midwestern University

Baby boomers, Generation X, Millenials, oh my! Effective graduate clinician supervision and CF mentorship require SLPs to be knowledgeable in evidence-based clinical practices as well as supervision models and techniques. Preceptors and mentors must also prepare to meet the needs of the individuals that they supervise. As Generation Z, born 1997-2010, is and will be our largest group of SLPs entering graduate school and the workforce for the next decade, it is essential to meet their unique needs. Literature is starting to address how to best educate and supervise these individuals. However, this literature is emerging slowly and may not promptly aid supervisors and mentors currently providing supervision. This presentation will review the ABCs of Supervising Gen Z by discussing the characteristics of Generation Z individuals, fundamental supervision models, and the most effective supervision techniques for this generation of students and SLPs.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • List three unique characteristics of Generation Z individuals.
  • Describe supervision models and how they intersect with the characteristics and needs of Generation Z.
  • Choose three techniques that would be useful in the supervision or mentorship of Generation Z students/CFs.

Level of Learning: Introductory

Time Ordered Agenda

5 minutes         Introductions and Disclosures
15 minutes       Generation Z overview
5 minutes         Research and Evidence
5 minutes         Supervision Foundations
50 minutes       Approaches for supervising and communicating with Gen Z
10 minutes       Collaboration and Questions


1213
11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Adult SLP    |   S08

Preparedness of Arizona PTs, OTs and SLPs for Working With Patients With Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias

Tamara Turner, OTD, OTR/L, Midwestern University
Patrice Ayala, PT, DPT, Midwestern University
Stephanie Christensen, CCC-SLP, Midwestern University
Malathy Venkatesh, CCC-SLP,  A.T. Still University

Arizona is anticipated to experience a 33.3 percent increase in the number of individuals with dementia from 2020 to 2025 (Alzheimer’s association 2023).  As the disease progresses over the years from preclinical Alzheimer’s disease to severe dementia, the individuals with dementia will present with unique healthcare challenges necessitating the services of physical therapists (PTs), occupational therapists (OTs), and speech-language pathologists (SLPs).  This study aimed to explore the experiences and views of PTs, OTs and SLPs regarding their preparedness for working with individuals with Alzheimer’s Disease and related dementias (ADRD). A purposive sample was used to recruit practitioners from each discipline and from various adult practice settings. A total of 75 practitioners were recruited for the study.  Practitioners completed questionnaires rating their knowledge of evidence-based approaches for ADRD. Eighteen focus groups were held with mixed disciplines and settings.  The discussion focused on practitioner thoughts about therapeutic potential of patients with ADRD , challenges experienced in service delivery and supports needed for working with ADRD patients.  Focus groups were recorded, transcribed, coded, and combined into themes. Preliminary findings indicate practitioners did not feel they had the required knowledge to use evidence-based therapeutic approaches and  felt ill-prepared to work with  patients with ADRD.  Practitioners identified various challenges experienced and supports needed to improve their comfort level in working with patients with ADRD. We discuss themes from each area, challenges  across disciplines and settings, and ways academic organizations, clinical settings and therapy managers can help address these barriers.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Identify the barriers in quality service delivery for individuals with dementia
  • Recognize the advanced knowledge and skills required to meet the unique needs of individuals with dementia
  • List at least three methods to address the knowledge and skill gaps identified in this study

Level of Learning: Intermediate


1225
11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Pediatric SLP    |   S09

Using AAC to Unlock Communicative Potential in Late-Talking Toddlers

Angelica McCarron, CCC-SLP, Tucson Medical Center, University of Arizona
Sarah Cretcher, CCC-SLP, University of Arizona

Traditionally, clinicians consider use of mid-high tech AAC devices most often for children with complex disabilities affecting independent motor speech use. This presentation seeks to dispel this misconception and help clinicians expand their repertoire of early intervention approaches to include AAC, even for children without complex and chronic sensorimotor disabilities. There is emerging rationale for use of AAC in early-intervention with late-talking toddlers, especially those who may not be responsive to other intervention methods. This session will outline traditional early intervention approaches and summarize the evidence base for use of AAC in early intervention. Most importantly, this session will help therapists identify clinical features that may indicate when to use AAC in their early intervention practice as well as how to incorporate mid-high tech speech-generating systems during therapy in order to support vocal output in previously nonverbal toddlers.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Summarize traditional early intervention strategies for late-talking toddlers  & summarize the evidenced-based rationale for use of AAC in early intervention
  • List at least three clinical features that may predict low responsiveness to traditional treatment approaches for late language emergence in toddlers
  • Define how speech generating systems support vocal output
  • Identify at least two ways to incorporate AAC into early intervention treatment sessions with nonverbal toddlers

Level of Learning: Introductory


1261
1:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Pediatric SLP   |   S10

Eval and Eligibility in Schools: Approach to Comprhensive Assessment

Marie Ireland, MEd, CCC-SLP, Charles Sturt University

SLPs must understand the many requirements for evaluation and eligibility for SLPs services that federal and state law set forth for U.S. schools. Comprehensive evaluation and documentation of all required eligibility criteria can help school SLPs combat overidentification, high SLP caseloads, and civil rights concerns. This session will integrate federal and state regulations with best practice and the latest research in the field. Case studies will highlight the need for professionals to differentiate educational and medical regulations and requirements and provide opportunities to discuss communication with families and others.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Identify specific requirements for evaluation and eligibility in schools
  • Document all required steps for eligibility with team members to ensure IDEA compliant decision making
  • Identify differences between educational identification and clinical diagnosis

Level of Learning: Intermediate


1246
1:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Multi-Interest    |   S11

Assessment of and Intervention for Auditory Processing Deficits in Children, Part 1

Teri James Bellis, PhD, Professor Emerita, University of South Dakota

This presentation will present methods of assessing auditory processing and listening difficulties in children. The focus will be on the identification of areas of auditory deficit for the purpose of developing deficit-specific intervention plans. Additional attention will be given to the importance of the audiologist’s contribution to a variety of activities, including inter-professional teams, that go beyond mere identification of peripheral hearing status.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe several methods of assessing auditory perceptual difficulties in children
  • Delineate categories of diagnostic tests of Central Auditory Processing Disorder
  • Discuss the importance of deficit-specific intervention for children with auditory processing difficulties

Level of Learning: Intermediate


1262
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
Medical SLP   |   S12

Voice Panel: Complex Cases in Voice and  Upper Airway

Aubrey Dunlap, MS, CCC-SLP, Midwestern University
Natalie Monahan, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Arizona
Denise Stats-Caldwell, MA, CCC-SLP, Arizona State University

Abstract: Coming Soon

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

Coming Soon

Level of Learning:

Coming Soon


1263
1:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Multi-Interest   |   S13

Gestalt Language Processors and the Role of Floortime Therapy

Nicole Allen, MS, CCC-SLP, Private Practice
Lisa Said, MS, CCC-SLP, Private Practice

Gestalt language processors (GLPs) acquire language in chunks and often present as ‘echolalic’. In this session, we will explore the six stages of GLPs and share our experience in using DIRFloortime as a therapy support. We discuss the first four Functional Emotional Developmental Capacities of DIR Floortime. Our data includes  several video samples of the impact on this child-led play based therapy in patients that use both oral language as well as Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) devices to share data on the positive impacts on this therapy in GLPs.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Identify the six stages of Gestalt Language Processors 
  • Describe Floortime therapy within the first four Functional Emotional Developmental Capacities
  • List the benefits of Floortime for GLP learners  
  • Describe the characteristics to consider for a GLP learner when considering AAC

Level of Learning:  Introductory


1264
3:15 pm - 4:45 pm
Multi-Interest   |   S14

The Communication Style and Mannerism of the Navajo People  (DEI)

Davis Henderson, PhD, CCC-SLP, Northern Arizona University

As my grandmother wove her rug she lectured many of her grandchildren to be “Be silent and to observe; yet be vocal and vigilant” all while not making eye contact with no one. Navajos, and other American Indians, communicate based on their cultural and traditional beliefs which may differ from Mainstream. These differences may be viewed as inappropriate as they do not adhere to the preferred style of communication by non-Navajo individuals. However, the communication style among Navajo homes are diverse as many Navajos come from traditional homes, modern/traditional homes, and modern homes. These diverse homes infuse different teaching and practices that influences the communication and mannerisms of many Navajo individual. This presentation highlights the style and mannerisms that are typical among Navajo homes which are appropriate and meaningful.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Determine how the communication style and mannerism differ from Navajo to mainstream.
  • Describe how SLP’s can adapt their communication styles to Navajo, and other AIs, individuals.
  • List three types of communication, or mannerisms, of Navajo individuals that were unknown.

Level of Learning:  Introductory

Time Ordered Agenda

5 minutes         Introduction
80 minutes       Presentation
15 minutes       Q and A


1257
3:15 pm - 4:45 pm
Multi-Interest    |   S15

Assessment of and Intervention for Auditory Processing Deficits in Children, Part 2

Teri James Bellis, PhD, Professor Emerita, University of South Dakota

This presentation will present methods of assessing auditory processing and listening difficulties in children. The focus will be on the identification of areas of auditory deficit for the purpose of developing deficit-specific intervention plans. Additional attention will be given to the importance of the audiologist’s contribution to a variety of activities, including inter-professional teams, that go beyond mere identification of peripheral hearing status.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe several methods of assessing auditory perceptual difficulties in children
  • Delineate categories of diagnostic tests of Central Auditory Processing Disorder
  • Discuss the importance of deficit-specific intervention for children with auditory processing difficulties

Level of Learning: Intermediate


1265
3:15 pm - 4:45 pm
Adult SLP   |   S16

Ethics, Difficult Conversations and End of Life. (Ethics)

Keri Winchester, MS, CCC-SLP, Certified End of Life Doula/Educator, Banner Gateway/Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center

This presentation will provide an overview of the various principles of ethics and ethical decision making.  You will learn about a framework for difficult conversations and questions to ask for providing goal concordant care.  And finally you will learn how recognize changes with end of life, how to support potential conversations and support patients and caregivers.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe various components of ethics and ethical decision making
  • Obtain resources for difficult conversations
  • List talking points for participating in difficult conversations
  • Describe basic information about the process of dying/end of life

Level of Learning:  Intermediate

Time Ordered Agenda

5 minutes         Introduction
30 minutes       Ethics
30 minutes       Difficult conversations
20 minutes       End of life
5 minutes         Q&A/Interactive wrap up


1258
3:15 pm - 4:45 pm
Pediatric SLP    |   S17

Multiple Oppositions: Practical Overview, Case Studies, & Clinical Tools

Keila Gutierrez, CCC-SLP, Desert Lily Bilingual Speech Therapy Clinic PLLC

I invite you to join me for a compelling presentation where we will demystify the multiple oppositions approach and discuss practical strategies for its implementation within your caseload. In our session, we will analyze authentic case studies, and I will offer pertinent clinical insights to enhance your understanding. This presentation integrates research-based literature with practical application. Your attendance promises not only educational value but also a professional and engaging experience.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • List three clinical characteristics that indicate the Multiple Oppositions treatment approach is an appropriate intervention for a child on your caseload
  • List three steps in the Multiple Oppositions treatment approach
  • List two strategies, based on the principles of motor learning, that can facilitate generalization

Level of Learning: Intermediate


Saturday, April 13

1222
8:00 am - 9:30 am
Pediatric SLP    |   S18

Language Evaluations for School-Age Children

Sarah Lynn Neiling, CCC-SLP, MA, University of Arizona
Melissa White, CCC-SLP, MA, University of Arizona

This presentation will center around selecting methods to evaluate language disorders in school-age children. We will discuss both standardized and non-standardized assessment methods, with a focus on understanding how to select and interpret standardized assessments for a particular purpose and population. This presentation is intended to be a practical guide and will be relevant for speech-language pathologists working with children in a variety of settings, including schools and clinics. In addition, we will cover culturally and linguistically responsive considerations particular to Arizona. Overall, this presentation is designed to help clinicians make evidence-based decisions surrounding testing for school-age children.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Evaluate whether a particular assessment is appropriate for a given purpose and population
  • Compare existing standardized assessments for language
  • Describe where to find supporting evidence to justify assessment choices

Level of Learning: Intermediate


1255
8:00 am - 9:30 am
Multi-Interest    |   S19

SLPA NOW!: Professional and Ethical Issues Facing SLPAs and Their Supervisors in Arizona (Ethics)

Jeffery Meeks, EdD, CCC-SLP, Northern Arizona University
Vickie Jones, SLPA, Tucson Charter School

SLPAs now will focus on current SLPA issues in Arizona. Our primary focus will be the  Code of Conduct, Scope of Practice and Ethical practices for SLPAs. This will also encompass looking at the roles and responsibilities of both the SLP and the SLPA in these areas as well as supervisory responsibilities for both the SLP and the SLPA. We will delve into professional social media presence, growth and expansion in the use of SLPAs, barriers to expansion, and utilization.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Identify the ethical issues facing SLPAs in a variety of settings.
  • Analyze the role of both the SLP and the SLPA in ethical and professional issues regarding supervision, documentation, and client services.
  • Describe the issues facing SLPAs as they work and practice in Arizona in a variety of settings.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Time Ordered Agenda

10 minutes       Introduction, disclosures and audience poll
5 minutes         Review of the SLPA licensing and certification
10 minutes       Review of supervision requirements AZ/ASHA
25 minutes       Ethics and the SLP-SLPA team
25 minutes       SLPA professional issues and resources
15 minutes       Audience question/answer and wrap-up


1237
8:00 am - 9:30 am
Adult SLP    |   S20

Cognitive Rehabilitation Then and Now: What Have We Learned in the Last Three Decades?  Part 1

McKay Moore Sohlberg, PhD, University of Oregon

Cognitive rehabilitation after brain injury is a complicated clinical undertaking that requires diverse knowledge and skills in the areas of cognitive processing, physical states, and psychosocial functioning, as well as behavior change and adaptation. Additionally, many different professional disciplines provide cognitive rehabilitation services, each with their own conceptual frameworks and practice methods. Together this has created a “black box” with inconsistent delivery and challenges in explaining the work to funders and other stakeholders. This presentation explores the progress that has occurred in the field over the last 30 years and reviews updates in our conceptualization and models of rehabilitation and applies them to three different treatment approaches.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe the Plan Implement & Evaluate (PIE) and Rehabilitation Treatment Specification System (RTSS) as applied to cognitive rehabilitation
  • Identify the key components of person-centered collaborative goal setting
  • Describe psychological mindedness practices that enhance working alliance, client engagement and psychoeducation
  • Describe treatment ingredients and the PIE process for; metacognitive strategy instruction, external aid training, use of attention drills (brain training)

Level of Learning: Intermediate


1259
8:00 am - 9:30 am
Audiology    |   S21

Becoming the GOAT: Pediatric Audiology

Bridget Shanahan Herrick, AuD, Arizona State University

Abstract:

Pediatric audiologists specialize in diagnosing and treating hearing loss in children. Many audiologists work on medical multidisciplinary teams to address speech/language development and progression of hearing loss or syndromes. Yet, children with hearing loss experience more challenges that just a deficit in their ears, such as learning challenges, social emotional challenges, and self-advocacy needs. Many of these needs may be addressed at school with support of their educational audiologist. The overall purpose of this presentation is to address ways we can work towards improving team collaboration between the clinical audiologist and school team.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Understand and add two additional items to their pediatric case history.
  • Recall the amount of deaf/hard of hearing students who complete high school and post-secondary education.
  • Outline options for aided testing for ensuring access to spoken information in the classroom.

Level of Learning: Introductory


1266
10:00 am - 11:30 am
Pediatric SLP  |   S22

Working Memory in Children

Shelley Gray, CCC-SLP, Arizona State University

Working memory encompasses an individual’s ability to process and store incoming information over brief periods of time. In this presentation we will review the different components of working memory in children. We know that working memory is a powerful predictor of learning in oral language, math, reading, and science. Because of this, children with learning difficulties who struggle academically are often assumed to have working memory deficits; however, in this presentation we will review research showing that working memory deficits do not always co-occur with developmental disabilities such as developmental language disorder or dyslexia and can occur in children with typical development (Gray, et al., 2019). This suggests that working memory assessments could contribute important information about children’s cognitive function over and above typical psycho-educational measures. It also suggests one possible explanation why some children compensate better than others for challenges presented by learning disabilities. Finally, we will review ways to support working memory in educational contexts.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • List the components of working memory
  • Describe whether all children with language learning disabilities have working memory problems
  • List three ways to support working memory in educational contexts

Level of Learning: Intermediate


1223
10:00 am - 11:30 am
Multi-Interest    |   S23

Tools You Can Use: Bilingual Assessment for Any SLP (DEI)

Victoria Clark, CCC-SLP, Arizona State University

Approximately a quarter of all Arizonans speak one or more languages other than English. This seminar draws on the best evidence available to support your referral and differential diagnosis of bilingual students or patients. SLPs in all settings are often in a position to make judgments about whether to a client is likely to have a speech-language disorder, or simply a speech-language difference as a speaker of a language variety or as an English Language Learner (ELL). Before referring for a bilingual evaluation, relevant information can be gathered by a monolingual clinician or a bilingual clinician, even those not speaking the home language of the client. In this seminar, a discussion of the most recent research on bilingual assessment, sources of converging evidence for diagnosis, and relevant assessment tools will be analyzed. Participants will practice using freely available assessments to gather information about bilingual clients for referral or differential diagnosis. Caregiver interview instruments and Dynamic Assessment tools from multiple sources will be presented and practiced within the session. Tools to describe language dominance will also be reviewed.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Differentiate between sources of converging evidence and how these can support diagnoses of speech-language differences vs. speech-language disorders.
  • Compare assessment tools that can be administered by bilingual or monolingual clinicians to build a case for a speech-language difference vs. disorder.
  • Apply understanding of converging evidence after practicing caregiver interview and dynamic assessment tools during the session.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Time Ordered Agenda

15 minutes       Bilingualism and difference vs. disorder
10 minutes       Converging evidence for diagnosis
15 minutes       Available Tools and resources
20 minutes       Caregiver Interview and practice
20 minutes       Dynamic Assessment and practice
10 minutes       Questions and discussion


1256
10:00 am - 11:30 am
Adult SLP    |   S24

Cognitive Rehabilitation Then and Now: What have We Learned in the Last Three Decades?  Part 2

McKay Moore Sohlberg, PhD, University of Oregon

Cognitive rehabilitation after brain injury is a complicated clinical undertaking that requires diverse knowledge and skills in the areas of cognitive processing, physical states, and psychosocial functioning, as well as behavior change and adaptation. Additionally, many different professional disciplines provide cognitive rehabilitation services, each with their own conceptual frameworks and practice methods. Together this has created a “black box” with inconsistent delivery and challenges in explaining the work to funders and other stakeholders. This presentation explores the progress that has occurred in the field over the last 30 years and reviews updates in our conceptualization and models of rehabilitation and applies them to three different treatment approaches.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe the Plan Implement & Evaluate (PIE) and Rehabilitation Treatment Specification System (RTSS) as applied to cognitive rehabilitation
  • Identify the key components of person-centered collaborative goal setting
  • Describe psychological mindedness practices that enhance working alliance, client engagement and psychoeducation
  • Describe treatment ingredients and the PIE process for; metacognitive strategy instruction, external aid training, use of attention drills (brain training)

Level of Learning: Intermediate


1267
10:00 am - 11:30 am
Audiology    |   S25

Living Well With Hearing Loss for Underserved Arizonans

Kate Helms- Tillery, PhD, CCC-SLP, Arizona State University
Aparna Rao, PhD, Arizona State University

In Arizona, approximately 200,000 adults lack access to hearing health care.  Untreated hearing loss is linked with social isolation, depression, and cognitive decline. Adults with untreated hearing loss experience difficulty communicating with their health providers, and face higher risks of hospitalization. Comprehensive hearing intervention has been shown to mitigate these negative effects. Access to comprehensive hearing health care includes not only diagnostic testing and appropriate amplification, but also personalized training to help individuals reach their communication goals. In this presentation, we will discuss a model we have developed and implemented at Arizona State University, which involves interprofessional collaboration between audiologists and speech-language pathologists. We will begin with an exploration of the concept of “living well” with hearing loss in the context of overall health.  Next we will present a life span approach to personalizing intervention, and summarize known variables affecting living well with hearing loss. Our intervention involves working with individual clients to identify their listening and communication goals, and then tailoring training to meet their unique needs.  Participants will practice setting goals and planning intervention based on case studies. The presentation will include a combination of didactic and interactive learning activities.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe the elements of comprehensive hearing health care.
  • Identify personalized communication and listening goals for individuals with hearing loss.
  • Develop personalized intervention plans for individuals with hearing loss.

Level of Learning: Intermediate


1268
1:00 pm - 2:30 pm
Multi Interest    |   S26

Supervising the Students of Today: Facing the Future Together (Supervision)

Kathleen R. Cazzato, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, University of Arizona
Karen Guilmette, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Arizona
Janet L. Hawley, ClinScD, CCC-SLP, University of Arizona
Natalie Monahan, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Arizona

The quality of the supervisory-student relationship is key to the success of the graduate clinicians’ professional growth and learning. Understanding your graduate student including their values, motivations, learning styles, and expectations will facilitate your ability to optimize this relationship and thus the outcomes of the practicum experience. We will share in-depth information about the demographics of today’s students including characteristics that are unique to the Gen Z generation, special attributes of ‘mature’ students, the diverse nature of our student populations, and the increasing role mental health plays in the learning process. Delving into the unique perspective and potential contributions of these individuals will help us better understand them and welcome them as they join us as colleagues in the work force and we FACE the FUTURE together.

Learning Objectives: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe key characteristics, values, and learning styles of our current graduate student cohorts in the post-Covid landscape.
  • Identify implications for these characteristics for student performance and the supervisory relationship in externship settings.
  • Describe at least three specific supervisory practices that may optimize student learning and foster independence in the clinical externship setting.

Level of Learning:  Intermediate

Time Ordered Agenda

10 minutes         Introduction to speakers and topic
30 minutes         The demographics currently in graduate school and implications for clinical education
10 minutes         Breakout activity
20 minutes         Suggestions to promote success during clinical externships
15 minutes         Breakout activity
10 minutes         Conclusions and questions


1269
1:00 pm - 2:30 pm
Multi-Interest   |   S27

Social Learning Differences in Neurodiverse Adolescents: Establishing EBP Through a Capstone Research Project

Darrell Dern, SLPD, CCC-SLP, Rocky Mountain University

This presentation provides current research findings to practicing clinicians regarding methodologies that support neurodiverse adolescents with social learning differences. It will offer insight into the evidence-based treatment frameworks, social metacognitive strategies, activities, and tools used to enhance observation of the social world and understanding and valuing dimensions of self. Additionally, it will foster discussion on how this intervention may be an effective and evidence-based tool to provide neurodiverse individuals with strategies to navigate the social world. Offered by a speech-language pathologist with extensive experience with neurodiverse individuals and currently working in high school-based practice, it will enable clinicians to engage in thought-provoking conversations about evidence-based practices.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Identify key aspects of social learning characteristics of neurotypical and neurodiverse adolescents.
  • Explain the methodologies of Social Thinking ® and Self-Concept Framework that form the foundation of a novel and evidence based intervention for building accurate sense of self in neurodiverse adolescents.
  • Recognize the effect of the novel intervention on accurate sense of self as demonstrated by the empirical study.

Level of Learning: Intermediate


12321:00 pm - 2:30 pm
Adult SLP    |   S28

Moving Onward and Downward in VFSS: The Importance of Evaluating the Entire Swallowing Continuum

Jessica Gregor, BCS-S, CCC-SLP, MS, Mayo Clinic

The swallowing continuum spans the lips to the stomach and comprises interrelated physiologic components of the oropharynx, airway, and esophagus. Due to the intimate interconnectivity, these components can influence one another during the swallowing process, causing upstream and/or downstream effects. Oropharyngeal and esophageal swallowing impairments frequently occur simultaneously, with up to 60% or more of patients referred for VFSS having an esophageal component (Gullung et al., 2012; Miles et al., 2015; Watts et al., 2019). A multidisciplinary team of specialists is ideal for optimal diagnostics and intervention of persons with dysphagia. Specialists, including SLPs, caring for persons with dysphagia must understand the complexity of this interplay, along with its inherent diagnostic and treatment implications.  Therefore, it is imperative for SLPs ensure that the videofluoroscopic swallowing evaluation includes visualization of the esophagus and employ a validated protocol.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • List three interrelationships between the oropharynx and esophagus.
  • Identify rationale for assessing the entire swallowing continuum under fluoroscopy.
  • Describe the value of videofluoroscopic swallowing studies, standardization practices, and multidisciplinary collaboration in dysphagia diagnostics.

Level of Learning: Intermediate


1270
1:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Audiology    |   S29

University of Arizona Advocacy for AHCCCS Coverage of Hearing Devices/Services for Adults

Thomas Muller, AuD, CCC-A, University of Arizona
Erica Hansen, AuD, CCC-A, University of Arizona
Amy Wheeler, AuD, CCC-A, University of Arizona

Arizona’s Medicaid program, the Arizona Healthcare Cost Containment System (AHCCCS) does not cover hearing aids, cochlear implants, aural rehabilitation or related audiology services for adults over age 21 and under age 65.  This leaves low-income, working-age adults in Arizona uncovered and with limited resources for hearing loss management.  Students and faculty are interested in advocating for legislative change that would create coverage for this population beyond initial exams.  Clinical faculty will provide an update on the research and tools they have been developing for this purpose.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Identify the barriers to hearing aids, cochlear implants, and related audiogic services for Arizonan's with limited income
  • Estimate the number of Arizonan's with hearing loss impacted by these barriers
  • Explain the ways in which they can help support the lobbying efforts anticipated.

Level of Learning:  Intermediate


1271
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
Audiology    |   S30

Interdisciplinary Approach to Vestibular Audiology Evaluation and Physical Therapy Management

Haley Lanoue, AuD, CCC-A, Washington University in St. Louis

A case study highlighting the benefits of an interdisciplinary approach to vestibular evaluation and management of dizzy patients. Cases to include examples of vestibular audiology testing at various timepoints within the patient’s rehabilitation process, including physical therapy treatment and Otology evaluation and medical management. These cases will emphasize the overall benefits of vestibular audiologists working closely with vestibular physical therapists, especially in the care of complex multifactorial causes of dizziness, and education on the benefits and limitations of rehabilitative physical therapy.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • List at least two etiologies/symptom profiles of patients who are good candidates for Physical Therapy vestibular rehabilitation.
  • List at least one etiology/symptom profile of a patient who is not likely to benefit from Physical Therapy vestibular rehabilitation.
  • Identify at least two indications a patient should be referred for further audiologic, medical, and/or physical therapy workup when seen for initial hearing/audiometric testing.

Level of Learning: Intermediate


1230
3:00 am - 4:30 am
Pediatric SLP    |   S31

AAC in Arizona- What is the process?

Danika Stampfel, CCC-SLP, ArSHA AAC Committee/ NAU AAC Evaluation and Training Program
Jeremy Legaspi, ArSHA AAC Committee / PRC-Saltillo
Kristy Gibson, ArSHA AAC Committee/ Tobii Dynavox
Rui Hernandez, ArSHA AAC Committee
Michelle Raymond, ArSHA AAC Committee

AAC is a language intervention approach that honors multiple modalities of communication for persons with complex communication needs. (Beukelman & Mirenda, 2012; Johnston et al., 2012; Romski & Sevcik, 1996). In 2020 the process for obtaining personal AAC devices through the Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD) changed to a managed care model. While the process has changed, the need for AAC has not changed. Personal AAC devices purchased through DDD and or private insurance, provide access to communication everywhere. During this presentation, we, your ArSHA AAC Committee will describe the process for obtaining a personal AAC device in Arizona as well as provide several resources for checking out devices, and use in treatment sessions. Bring your AAC questions for solutions and more!

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Discuss pertinent AAC documentation for medical justification
  • Explain steps in the new AAC referral process
  • Identify three resources for AAC evaluation process
  • Identify and describe one strategy for implementation or trial of an AAC device

Level of Learning: Introductory


1218
3:00 pm - 4:30 pm
Multi-Interest    |   S32

Myofunctional Disorders and Anklyoglossia - What Speech Therapists Need to Know

Joy Leslie, MS, CCC-SLP, Private Practice

Myofunctional therapy is research-based and has an important role to play as SLPs and SLPAs work to remediate articulation errors. Our clients often demonstrate open mouth posture, tongue tie, frontal/lateral lisps, and stubborn /r/ errors – let’s take a closer look at the oral structures and function behind these problems! Myofunctional therapy can help clients improve nasal breathing, lip closure, tongue retraction, and open bite/overbite. Learn what to look for, how to incorporate myo into your current therapy sessions, and how to discuss these topics with parents. Discussion will include tethered oral tissues (lip tie, tongue tie) and their impact on tongue position at rest, range of motion, and precision of movement during speech.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Identify three symptoms of a myofunctional disorder.
  • Describe three oral motor exercises that could be used to address correct oral rest posture.
  • Explain the impact of tethered oral tissues on speech production.

Level of Learning: Intermediate


1217
3:00 pm - 4:30 pm
Multi-Interest    |   S33

My 50-year Journey with Apraxia in Adults and Children.

Barbara Dabul, PhD, Private Practice

The speaker contributed to a paradigm shift early in her career from apraxia as a linguistic deficit to apraxia as a motor speech disorder. In today's presentation, she will share her 50 years of experience in assessing and treating apraxia, and she will provide practical tools for therapy, including ten common elements for successful treatment of apraxia in both adults and children, as well as a cueing hierarchy for use by SLPs, other professionals, and family members for maximum success in communicating with persons with apraxia.  Participatory exercises will be provided to participants, with a goal of helping them to understand what it feels like to have apraxia. Identification of apraxia and assessment tools will then be described, including the rationale behind the speaker's published test, The Apraxia Battery for Adults.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • List three of the ten common elements described for successful treatment of apraxia, and current treatments which would incorporate those elements.
  • Provide a cueing hierarchy for maximal assistance by SLPs, other professionals, and parents to apraxic adults and children who are attempting to speak clearly and accurately.
  • State five of the 15 behaviors important for any assessment of apraxia, to differentiate it from other disorders.
  • Share a short two-person exercise to understand the difficlties and challenges of apraxia.

Level of Learning: Introductory


1272
3:00 pm - 4:30 pm
Audiology    |   S34

Grand Rounds

Nancy Flores, AuD, CCC-A, Barrow ENT and Skull Base Surgery, Dignity Health
Linda Norrix, PhD, CCC-A, University of Arizona Speech, Language, & Hearing Clinics
Jennie Mollerup Wagner, AuD, CCC-A, Deer Valley Unified School District

Topic 1:  Sound Perspectives: Exploring Candidacy and Treatment Options for Single-Sided Deafness

Single-sided deafness (SSD) poses significant challenges to individuals, affecting their ability to localize sounds, understand speech in noisy environments and maintain balanced hearing perception. This abstract presents a comprehensive program aimed at addressing SSD, focusing on candidate selection criteria and diverse treatment strategies. This presentation explores various treatment modalities available for SSD, including conventional hearing aids, bone-anchored hearing devices and cochlear implants. Each modality's advantages, limitations and candidacy criteria are examined, providing clinical insights into personalized treatment selection. These treatment selections offer promising avenues for improving speech intelligibility, spatial hearing and overall quality of life for individuals with SSD.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Define the impact of SSD on individuals' auditory capabilities: how SSD affects sound localization, speech perception in noisy environments and overall hearing perception balance, thereby appreciating the challenges faced by individuals with SSD.
  • Describe candidate selection criteria for SSD interventions.
  • Show proficiency in evaluating and comparing treatment modalities for SSD.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Topic 2:  It Takes a TEAM: Newly Identified Sensorineural Hearing Loss in a Preschool Child

A preschool child did not pass her school hearing screening. Challenges for this child’s hearing healthcare included: obtaining a diagnostic hearing evaluation, performing the diagnostic hearing evaluation, finding and receiving appropriate treatment. However, she also had a second set of challenges: not speaking her audiologist’s first language and cultural differences, a changing citizenship status, parents needing help with insurance/financial need. Several audiologists, students and community members teamed up to provide support to this child and her family. The child was eventually diagnosed with a bilateral mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss. She was fit with hearing aids and plans for aural rehabilitation and education were made. This case illustrates some of the many ways audiologists provide health literacy and social support when providing hearing health care. The importance of the connections made with patients and their families and the interconnections with colleagues, professionals and community organizations is emphasized.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Formulate a plan for a diagnostic hearing evaluation for a preschooler with language/linguistic differences who has a “likely” bilateral sensorineural hearing loss.
  • Describe at least two things to consider when providing audiologic rehabilitation services for a preschooler with a newly-identified hearing loss.
  • Describe how best-case healthcare teams can be created.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Topic 3:  Cochlear Implant, English Language Learner, Functional Listening Evaluation – A Case Study

A case study: a student coming to our school district from Taiwan who is a user of bilateral cochlear implants. Discussion will center on the challenges that he faces and how the Functional Listening Evaluation has helped us in designing specialized instruction for him.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe the Functional Listening Evaluation (FLE)
  • State where to get more information about the FLE
  • Define FLE and why should it be included in our “tool kit.”

Level of Learning: Introductory

 

Poster Sessions

Friday, April 12  

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
SP1  |   Audiology

Deciding Factors in Selecting a Career Path in Educational Audiology

Natasha Seaton, AuD, CCC-A, FAAA, University of Arizona and Happy Ears Hearing Center
Linda Norrix, CCC-A, PhD, The University of Arizona and  Tucson Medical Center
Aileen Wong, AuD, CCC-A, The University of Arizona
Nicole Marrone, CCC-A, PhD, The University of Arizona

Educational Audiologists are health-related professionals who specialize in prevention, identification, and treatment of hearing loss for children 3 years of age to 21 in the school system. Given that they play a critical role in ensuring the success of deaf and hard of hearing students, the Educational Audiology Association (EAA) and the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) recommend a ratio of one educational audiologist per 10,000 school children. Despite this recommendation, no state currently meets this ratio, and many far exceed the recommendation. Recognizing there may be a possible shortage of educational audiologists, this project focused on creating a survey designed to identify what factors persuade or dissuade audiologists from pursuing a career as educational audiologists. The survey was distributed electronically to audiologists and audiology externs. Outcomes of this research provide insights into perceived factors that motivate and deter individuals from a career in educational audiology. From our findings, we also will share possible recommendations for recruiting professionals into a career in educational audiology.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe two perceived factors that motivate individuals to become educational audiologists.
  • Describe two perceived factors that may deter individuals from becoming educational audiologists.
  • Identify one or more possible recommendations for recruiting new educational audiologists.

SP2   |   Multi-Interest

Dysphagia Care in Rural Arizona: Perspectives, Barriers, and Opportunities

Sara Monti, CCC-SLP, MS, Summit Healthcare Regional Medical Center
Tifani Wilhelm, CCC-SLP, CLC, Summit Healthcare Regional Medical Center
Julia Watson, CCC-SLP, MS, Summit Healthcare Regional Medical Center

Rural populations across the United States have experienced long-standing health disparities that distinguish their experiences from those of their urban counterparts, including reduced life expectancy, poorer health outcomes, higher incidences of disease, and reduced access to healthcare. Despite these common themes, rural communities are varied, diverse, and, for many of them, understudied. Data regarding the incidence and prevalence of dysphagia and access to dysphagia services in rural communities nationwide is sparse, and particularly so for the Southwestern United States. In an effort to address this gap in the literature, this poster session will use the Arizona White Mountains region as a case study and use it as a lens through which to examine broader trends associated with rural dysphagia and feeding services. Pertaining to both the acute care and outpatient settings, geographic dispersion; population trends and migration patterns; healthcare workforce; access and infrastructure; clinical pathway challenges; and post-COVID era changes will be discussed. Finally, in sharing the unique barriers and opportunities faced with expanding service lines and the various possibilities for incorporating rural health care into graduate training programs, it is hoped that the increased awareness will support both development of well-rounded professionals and ongoing improvement to dysphagia and feeding care access in rural areas.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe the burden of disease for dysphagia in the White Mountains region and rural Arizona more broadly
  • Identify infrastructure, expertise, population, and clinical pathway challenges facing rural Arizona’s access to dysphagia care
  • List three resources or strategies for improving rural healthcare access to dysphagia services
  • Integrate the information to support dysphagia service expansion in the rural Arizona setting

SP3   |   Adult SLP

Early Cognitive-Communication Therapy for Adults With mTBI/Concussion and Persistent Symptoms

Chloe Baker, Northern Arizona University

Five adults approximately one month post-mild TBI/concussion participated in early, weekly cognitive-communication therapy. All described persistent symptoms related to the injury, and reported that therapy was beneficial in recovery. Results showed improvements on the Awareness Questionnaire following treatment.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe the importance of early cognitive-communication therapy.
  • Identify benefits reported by patients with Persistent Symptoms.
  • Describe the unique needs of each client with mild traumatic brain injury.

SP4    |   Adult SLP

Perceived Strengths and Limitations of Telepractice for Persons With Aphasia

Rosa Stewart, BA, Northern Arizona University
Emi Isaki, PhD, CCC-SLP, Northern Arizona University

Telepractice is a form of service delivery used by speech-language pathologists (SLPs) to screen, assess, and provide intervention to persons with aphasia (PWA). During COVID-19, telepractice became mandatory following social distancing guidelines. Little is known about how caregivers to PWA and SLPs feel about telepractice aphasia therapy. A questionnaire was provided to caregivers of PWA and clinicians to determine the perceived strengths and limitations of using telepractice. Results will add to the literature on the feasibility and efficacy of this modality of therapy.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Identify perceived strengths and limitations of telepractice aphasia therapy from SLPs.
  • Identify perceived strengths and limitations of telepractice aphasia therapy from caregivers of PWA.
  • Discuss clinical implication of these results.

 SP5   |   Adult SLP

The Effects of Multiple mTBI in Adults and Possible CTE

Allie Lopez, BA, Northern Arizona University
Alexia Leon, BA, Northern Arizona University
Emi Isaki, PhD, CCC-SLP, Northern Arizona University

Ninety plus adult participants reported their history for mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Although reports of injuries were subjective, a high number of mTBI was indicated. Based on the athletic literature, similar concerns for Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) occur in the general population. The clinician should consider the possibility of CTE if future dementia occurs after multiple mTBIs. Currently, the field of speech-language pathology does not have standards of best-practice for CTE.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe the number of mTBIs in the general population.
  • Explain the prevalence of CTE with multiple mTBIs.
  • Discuss the possible association of CTE and multiple mTBIs.

SP6    |   Adult SLP

High-Flow Nasal Cannula and Swallowing in Hospitalized Inpatients

Cintamani Ellsworth, CCC-SLP, Northern Arizona University and Northern Arizona Healthcare
Emi Isaki, PhD, Northern Arizona University

The purpose of this study was to examine swallowing outcomes, including overall level of swallowing dysfunction and presence of aspiration and silent aspiration, in hospitalized patients receiving a form of supplemental oxygen known as High Flow Nasal Cannula (HFNC).  This is a single center, within subjects, retrospective study of 21 hospitalized inpatients who underwent Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (FEES) while receiving supplemental oxygen via HFNC. Subjects had their swallowing evaluated a minimum of two times. At least once with FEES while on HFNC and at least once with FEES or a Modified Barium Swallow (MBS) study when on low-flow oxygen or room air.   When patients were on HFNC, their overall swallowing function on FEES was rated as significantly more impaired (Z = -3.439, p< 0.001) than when they were on low-flow oxygen or room air. Additionally, it was found during FEES that the odds of having an aspiration event for those on HFNC were 5.2 the odds of having an aspiration event when not on HFNC  (OR 5.2, 95% CI: 1.36-19.77 p=0.0156). Findings related to silent aspiration were not significant.  The results of this study indicate that HFNC is a factor that should be considered when determining if a patient is appropriate for oral alimentation. Given the limited data on HFNC and swallowing function, and the fragility of this population, instrumental examination of swallowing prior to initiation of oral intake is prudent.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe gaps in the current literature related to High Flow Nasal Cannula and swallowing.
  • Identify mechanisms by which critically ill hospitalized patients are at risk for dysphagia.
  • Discuss one way that the results of this study could be incorporated into clinical practice.

 SP7    |   Pediatric SLP

Support Needs of Autistic Adult Females in Higher Education

Sydney Stone, BS, Midwestern University
Schea Fissel, PhD, Midwestern University

Many neurodiverse females enter college undiagnosed, misdiagnosed, or seeking a medical diagnosis, which limits their access to academic accommodations, but also to knowledge of their own identity, disability, and strengths. These limitations constrain neurodiverse females’ self-determinacy, which is needed to seek accommodations, find mentorship, self-advocate, or access supportive membership in various communities and care-networks. Many are left to navigate the social landscape of academia alone, resulting in feelings of isolation, academic failure, or drop out. This presentation reports the results of a nation-wide survey that asked neurodiverse females enrolled in college to report their preferences for social support in higher education. These survey results are grounded within the lived experiences of two neurodiverse SLP students, who report their experiences and support preferences.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe the experiences of adult autistic females.
  • Describe the support needs of adult autistic females.
  • Explain the identity of adult autistic females.
  • List ways to support positive identity in adult autistic females.

SP8   |   Adult SLP

Bilingual Cognition Following Brain Injury and Implications for Reading Performance

Moyi Chang, BS, Arizona State University
Ileana Ratiu, PhD, Arizona State University

Brain injuries impact multiple cognitive functions such as attention, memory, and higher-level executive functions. These abilities are necessary for complex skills, such as reading comprehension. Executive function skills are also critical for language processing in bilingual individuals. Studies have shown that individuals with traumatic brain injuries perform worse on measures of reading than control participants, especially when reading requires inferencing. Further, evidence has shown that bilingual individuals with acquired brain injury may be impacted differently than monolingual individuals. The current study examined reading comprehension in bilingual and monolingual individuals with and without a history of traumatic brain injury under varying reading conditions. Performance was measured using both behavioral (e.g., reading time, accuracy) and physiological (e.g., eye movements) methodologies. Those with traumatic brain injuries reported significantly worse cognitive symptoms and showed subtle deficits in reading comprehension compared to controls. Consistent with prior studies, bilingual individuals’ performance on the reading comprehension task was more impacted by traumatic brain injury than monolingual performance. Interestingly, eye movement measures were more sensitive to group differences in performance than behavioral measures alone. These findings inform tailored intervention approaches to support reading comprehension skills in individuals with traumatic brain injury.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Explain two consequences of traumatic brain injury related to reading comprehension.
  • Learners will identify differences in self-reported cognitive symptoms and reading performance between monolingual and bilingual individuals with and without traumatic brain injury.
  • Learners will explain the clinical implications of reading comprehension deficits following an traumatic brain injury.

SP9    |   Pediatric SLP

The Effect of Using Social Thinking® and The Self-Concept Framework Methodologies on Accurate Sense of Self in Neurodiverse Adolescents

Darrell Dern, SLPD, CCC-SLP, Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions
Brooks Peters, PhD, Forsyth County School
Nancy Clements, CCC-SLP, Social Thinking® Boston
Nancy Cotton, PhD, Social Thinking Boston®

This poster presentation provides current research findings to practicing clinicians regarding methodologies that support neurodiverse adolescents with social learning differences. It will offer insight into the treatment frameworks, social metacognitive strategies, activities, and tools used to enhance observation of the social world and understanding and valuing dimensions of self. Additionally, it will foster discussion on how this intervention may be an effective tool to provide neurodiverse individuals with strategies to navigate the social world. Offered by a speech-language pathologist with extensive experience with neurodiverse individuals and currently working in high school-based practice, it will enable clinicians to engage in thought-provoking conversations about evidence-based practices.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Integrate knowledge and information from the literature about psychosocial development milestones, the factors related to a healthy sense of self, and the experiences and demands that high school has on neurodiverse adolescent’s sense of self.

  • Apply the research findings and determine if an integrated intervention utilizing Social Thinking® and The Self-Concept Framework methodologies may affect neurodiverse adolescents’ accurate sense of self and observations of the social world.

  • Support clinicians supporting adolescents with social learning differences using evidence-based practices across community and school-based practices.


SP10    |   Multi-Interest

The Effect of Aging on Vowel Production

Brooklyn Jones, BA, Northern Arizona University
Benjamin Tucker, PhD, Northern Arizona University

Various researchers have sought to get a better understanding of how aging influences speech production. While reduction, like producing [dʒitˀjɛt] for did you eat yet? is a normal process in spontaneous speech production, there is limited knowledge of the relationship between aging and vowel reduction or even how aging effects a speaker's vowel space. Speech disorders, such as dysarthria, can result in reduced articulatory movements that are similar to the speech reduction described earlier. Thus, it is important to investigate, as individuals age, the typical use of reduced speech. The researchers transcribed and forced-aligned read speech and spontaneous speech produced by 18 younger (17-31) and 13 older speakers (64-79). Then, extracted formant values for the stressed vowels in the read and spontaneous speech to investigate differences in vowel space. The results of this study would further support the understanding of reduction in spontaneous speech and how changes in vowel space differ in dysarthric and non-dysarthric speakers.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Described vowel space changes throughout the aging process.
  • Identify vowel space changes throughout the aging process.
  • Discuss the clinical implications of these results.

SP11    |   Pediatric SLP

The Language Delay Associated with Chromosome 12Q24.31-33 Deletion and Its Impact on Those Individuals and Their Caregivers: A Case Study.

Emily McKenney, BA, A.T. Still University
Ekaterina Bruno CCC-SLP, MEd, Research Advisor, A.T. Still  University

There is limited research on the topic of Chromosome 12Q24.31-33 deletion in addition to a language delay associated within it (Al-Zahrani et al., 2011). Chromosome 12Q24.31-33 deletion is characterized by short stature, heart defects, speech and language delays, and an association within autism. Language progress may be slower in this population and the treatment might be different from the traditional approach (Law et al., 2005). Considering the lack of research about language delay, Speech-Language Pathology intervention, and data on quality of life in individuals with Chromosome 12Q24.31-33 deletion, there's a great need to at least start addressing these issues.   This case study investigates effects of Speech-Language Pathology intervention for language delay in an individual diagnosed with Chromosome 12Q24.31-33 deletion and an impact on the quality of life of this individual and their caregivers. The lead investigator conducted a survey of past and present Speech-Language Pathologists that have worked with this individual and used the Quality of Life Scale to determine potential effects on the quality of life of the individual with Chromosome 12Q24.31-33 deletion and their caregivers. The case study contributes to the existing literature and helps to expand knowledge and data on this rare condition.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe the need for research in language delay and intervention in individuals with Chromosoeme 12Q24.31-33 deletion.
  • Explain how language treatment may be different in individuals with Chromosome 12Q24.31-33 deletion.
  • Explain how langauge delay may effect the quality of life in individuals with Chromosome 12Q24.31-33 deletion and their caregivers.

SP12    |   Pediatric SLP

Marhabla Dialecti: Social Media Resource for Current and Aspiring SLPs

Christine Abassi, BS, Midwestern University
Nancy Lira, BA, Midwestern University
Melissa Pierce-Rivera, PhD , CCC-SLP, Midwestern University

Background: Research has shown that speech-language pathologists lack the confidence to treat and evaluate students from diverse backgrounds. For current and aspiring speech-language pathologists (SLPs) to provide efficient services to bilingual and multicultural students, they must be aware of dialectal and cultural differences within and between diverse languages and cultures. Limited resources are available about other languages and cultures to this level of detail. Method: We created a pediatric-focused social media resource (Instagram account) to inform current and aspiring SLPs about Spanish and Arabic dialects and the cultures that use them. We collected quantitative data from Instagram user analytics and used thematic analysis to describe the nature of user comments on the posts. Results: We published sixteen posts across 8 weeks, covering four distinct dialects of Spanish and four of Arabic. Followers and non-followers of the account engaged 381 times with posts covering cultural considerations and linguistic features. Instagram analytics showed primarily female users in the United States, Jordan, India, and Indonesia in addition to specific cities across a diverse range of ages. Qualitative analysis revealed that users found the posts valuable and applicable to their own clinical practice.    Conclusion: There is a need for accessible resources for SLPs to learn about specific dialects and cultural characteristics associated with speakers of different languages. By utilizing social media platforms such as Instagram, SLPs can efficiently and effectively disseminate helpful information to SLPs to support more culturally sensitive diagnoses and treatment.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe cultural considerations for work with children from at least three distinct groups of Spanish or Arabic speakers.
  • Describe linguistic characteristics (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics) of at least three distinct groups of Spanish or Arabic speakers.
  • Identify the benefits of recognizing dialectal and cultural differences for appropriate assessment and intervention with children.

SP13    |   Multi-Interest

Correlation Between Previous SLPA Experience and Graduate Student Clinical Skills

Jessica Poet, BS, Midwestern University
Jessie Lind, BA, Midwestern University
Danielle Reed, CCC-SLP, Midwestern University

Background: This study investigates the preparedness of graduate students in Speech-Language Pathology (SLP), comparing those with prior experience as Speech-Language Pathology Assistants (fSLPAs) to those without such experience (nSLPAs). Method: The aim is to discern significant differences in their readiness and correlations between the work settings of fSLPAs (e.g., home health, private practice, school-based, or telehealth) and their clinical readiness. A 19-question survey was developed and distributed online to 108 respondents, including 33 fSLPAs and 75 nSLPAs, ensuring anonymity and following ethical guidelines.  Results: Quantitative analysis revealed a medium effect size for self-confidence in pediatric clinical abilities among fSLPAs (d = .574) and a large effect size for the question that students with prior SLPA experience are more successful in graduate school (d = 1.302). Other effect sizes were small or nonexistent. The results indicate that the majority of fSLPAs had pediatric experience before graduate school, contributing to reported confidence and the observed effect size. However, confirmation bias may influence the higher confidence levels in fSLPAs regarding their success in graduate school.  Conclusions: The findings underscore the potential impact of SLPA experience on clinical readiness, particularly in pediatric settings. Further research is needed to explore whether fSLPAs can attribute their success in graduate school to their prior field experience.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Identify if there is confirmation bias in the confidence of fSLPA's in graduate school.
  • Discuss possible reasons for improved confidence of fSLPAs vs. nSLPAs (i.e., previous work settings, time in the field, etc.)
  • Discuss fSLPA confidence in pediatric clinical settings when compared to nSLPA graduate students.

 SP14   |   Adult SLP

SLP Graduate Student Preparedness in Providing Care to Transgender Individuals

Ashley Mixon, BA, A.T. Still University
Ivonne Maldonado De la Rosa, PhD, Research Advisor, A.T. Still University

Transgender voice services are an important form of gender affirmation care that addresses the voice and speech aspects of communication to reflect one's gender identity and or gender expression. As more transgender individuals seek out services from speech-language pathologists (SLPs), the need for improving culturally competent and responsive care is imperative. It is expected that SLP’s provide expertise in modifying the voice and other aspects of communication, while also demonstrating appropriate, inclusive, respectful, and competent care. The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) recognizes the importance and impact in providing services to transgender individuals and states that transgender individuals may seek gender affirmation services to make their voice and/or gender expression congruent with their gender identity and/ or gender expression. However, it has been generally found that very few clinicians have received training in  providing services to the transgender population. This project aims to investigate the preparedness and knowledge of SLP graduate students in providing voice treatment to transgender individuals and the factors that influence their preparedness and knowledge.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Identify the need for Transgender voice services
  • List factors that influence a graduate students preparedness
  • Prepare future clinicians in providing services to transgender clients

SP15    |   Pediatric SLP

Identifying Pediatric Feeding Disorders in Children Birth to Five

Cynthia Farrell, CCC-SLP, Northern Arizona University
Grace Flynn, BA, Northern Arizona University
Elana Hirschkatz, BS, Northern Arizona University

The purpose of this poster is to increase awareness of pediatric feeding and swallowing screening “red flags”, both in case history information and clinical observations. Incidence rates of Pediatric Feeding Disorder (PFD) have been steadily increasing with the prevalence being 1 in 37 children under the age of five in the United States (Kovicic, et al., 2020). As healthcare is improving, survival rates are also increasing for medically fragile infants and PFDs are becoming more prevalent (Homer, 2015). These children with swallowing disorders are “showing up” in the schools and communities with safety risks for eating and drinking activities, causing schools and communities to be more liable (Arvedson, 2020). Early identification of children who have PFD is important to support their health, developmental, psychological, and learning readiness.  Therefore, there is a need for interprofessionals to utilize effective screening procedures in the area of pediatric feeding disorders.  Many screeners exist to identify children with PFDs, such as the Infant and Child Feeding Questionnaire (ICFQ) (Barkmeier-Kraemer et al, 2017) and the Pedi Eat. (Thoyre et al, 2014).  However, members of the child’s interprofessional team, including the caregiver, need increased awareness and training to utilize these tools to help with early detection of PFD. This poster will present evidence-based signs and symptoms of PFD to facilitate use of these screening tools and appropriate referrals to the feeding specialist on the child’s interprofessional team.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • List feeding and swallowing red flags for all practice settings.
  • Describe the importance of early identification with PFD.
  • Provide a list of screening procedures and tools to assist with early detection of PFD.

SP16   |   Audiology

Advocating for Hearing Healthcare: A Large-Scale Student Group Project

Erica Hansen , AuD, University of Arizona
Kayli Boyles, BS, University of Arizona
Rosemary Bramlett, BS, University of Arizona
Bryanne Crump, BS, University of Arizona
Grace Lavine, BS, University of Arizona
Brianna Robillard, BS, University of Arizona
Danielle Robillard, BS, University of Arizona
Abbie White, BS, University of Arizona
Nicole Marrone, Ph.D, University of Arizona
Tom Muller, AuD, University of Arizona
Linda Norrix, PhD, University of Arizona
David Velenovsky, PhD, University of Arizona
Amy Wheeler, AuD, University of Arizona
Aileen Wong, AuD, University of Arizona

Presently, there are limited resources to support adults with hearing loss who have low-income in Arizona. This is in part because Arizona is one of twenty-one states in the United States that do not have hearing health coverage through Medicaid. In response, 7 doctor of audiology students at the University of Arizona, along with 9 faculty members, are working on a multi-semester project to study access to hearing healthcare care for this population to be completed in Spring 2024. As part of these efforts, a tool was developed to compare 50 state and 6 country models for diagnosis, follow-up, counseling, hearing aids, replacements/repairs, and aural rehabilitation. Based on these findings, a proposed model for coverage of hearing services and hearing devices for adults under Arizona’s Medicaid was created. Anticipated utilization and cost of implementing the program was carefully estimated. Additionally, a summary of the literature regarding the personal and financial costs of untreated hearing loss is being drafted. The students visited the state capitol and met with legislators this spring. Upcoming efforts will include proposed initiatives to mobilize stakeholders, such as patient groups and professional hearing organizations.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Compare existing models for providing hearing healthcare to adults with low-income and learn about the vast differences that occur.
  • Describe our proposed Arizona model for the future and its rationale.
  • Identify information and advocacy efforts that may be transferable to other states attempting a similar objective.
  • Discuss how collaboration can move audiologists and speech language pathologists toward a productive future.

SP17   |   Audiology

Evaluating Bone Conduction Thresholds With Various Head Coverings

Tricia Stanley, BS, Student Researcher
Kimberly Skinner, PhD, A.T. Still University

No formal protocol currently exists for bone conduction testing for patients who wear head coverings. We recently surveyed hearing care professionals and found there is wide variety in bone conduction testing practices when patients wear a head covering. Here, we present data comparing bone conduction thresholds measured while wearing a baseball cap, a wig, and a hair scarf compared to baseline thresholds. Considering the cultural and religious diversity in the United States, the results of this study support the development of bone-conduction testing protocols for patients who wear head coverings.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe the instrumentation used in bone conduction.
  • Describe the current guidelines for bone conduction testing.
  • Identify the impact of the head coverings used in this study on bone conduction thresholds.

SP18    |   Pediatric SLP

Breaking Language Barriers: An English-Tagalog Articulation  Informal Assessment

Kazhra Kelcho, BS, A. T. Still University
Ekaterina Bruno, CCC-SLP, MEd, A. T. Still University

The United States is home to a diverse population with over 23% of individuals identifying as bilingual. While Spanish is the most prevalent non-English language spoken in the country, there is a significant presence of Tagalog speakers, especially in Hawaii, Nevada, and California (US Census Bureau, 2020). Despite the growing linguistic diversity of the United States, there is a limited selection of assessment tools for non-English and non-Spanish languages. This imposes on a Speech-Language Pathologist’s (SLP) ability to appropriately evaluate and support bilingual individuals.  In the attempt to bridge this gap, we have developed a bilingual Tagalog/English articulation informal assessment to assist SLPs in identifying potential articulation and phonological disorders in both languages. This tool includes assessment of consonants in initial, medial, and final positions and a connected speech sample in both languages. This allows the clinician to identify articulation and phonological errors and document them in the provided templates. Additionally, we provided an audio recording of the stimulus materials for the clinician's convenience and the visual stimuli if the clinician decides to include a visual component evaluating a child.  This innovative assessment is designed to be culturally sensitive and inclusive of the unique linguistic features of both Tagalog and English. A valuable addition to the currently available resources, this informal assessment empowers SLPs to serve the population of bilingual Tagalog/English speakers effectively and ensure they get the support necessary.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe the limited access to assessment tools for bilingual individuals in languages other than English/Spanish.
  • Recognize the critical need of a bilingual English/Tagalog articulation and phonological assessment to address gaps in SLP services.
  • Describe the benefits of the proposed bilingual English/Tagalog assessment.

CEUs

This course is offered for up to 1.2 ASHA CEUs (various levels)

The supervision courses (Session 7 and 26) are offered separately for up to 0.3 ASHA CEUs (various levels)

The ethics courses (sessions 16 and 19) are offered separately for up to 0.3 AHSA CEUs (intermediate level)

The DEI courses (Sessions 1, 2, 14 and 23) are offered separately for up to 0.5 ASHA CEUs (intermediate level)


ArSHA is approved by the American Academy of Audiology to offer Academy CEYs for this activity.  The program is worth a maximum of 0.9 CEUs.  Academy approval of this continuing education activity is based on course content only and does not imply endorsement of course content, specific products or clinical procedure, or adherence of the event to the Academy’s Code of Ethics.  Any views that are presented are those of the presenter/CE Provider and not necessarily of the American Academy of Audiology.

 

 

 

Disclosures

Coming Soon!

Fees

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Groups

ArSHA Convention - Group Registration Instructions

When professionals from the same workplace/district register to attend Convention together, they are eligible to receive a discounted rate.  Examples of workplace/district are School Districts, Hospitals, Health/Rehab Centers, University Faculty/Staff, Staffing Agencies or Private Practice.

Note:  All registration forms must come in one packet in order to qualify for the Group Discount.  (Please mail these to ArSHA at 700 McKinght Park Drive, Suite 708, Pittsburgh, PA 15237 or email to arsha@arsha.org)  There is no online group registration.

Professional Group Rates – Full Convention

3 or more ArSHA members, same agency

$205/ person – before or on 3/1/2024
$235/person – after 3/1/2024

Professional Group Rates – Single Day

3 or more ArSHA members, same agency

$145/person – before or on 3/1/2024
$175/person – after 3/1/2024

Downloadable program and registration form: https://arsha.org/documents/2024_con/ArSHAConventionBrochure2024-REVISED2.pdf

Accomodations

EL Conquistador Hotel
10000 N. Oracle Road
Tucson AZ 85704

Call: 1-888-370-0980

Group Code: ASH411
Rate: $209 plus tax, per night
Cut-Off Date: Reservations must be made by 03/19/24

Reserve a Room at the El Conquistador