Arizona Speech-Language-Hearing Association's 2023 Convention

March 31 - April 1, 2023

ARSHA23-conv_FINAL

Location:
Doubletree by Hilton Hotel Phoenix-Tempe
2100 S Priest Dr, Tempe, AZ 85282
(480) 967-1441

Click here to book your room now!
(Room rate: $189.00) 

Registration:

Pre-registration is now closed. You can still attend, by registering in-person at the convention. For more information or if you have questions, please contact the ArSHA office at arsha@arsha.org or 855-727-2836.

Convention Brochure (PDF)

Want some ArSHA convention merchandise? Click here & order now! Order before March 27th so you can pick up your items at convention!
The ArSHA Annual Business Luncheon and Award Ceremony will take place during the Convention on Saturday, April 1, 2023 from 11:30 am to 12:45 pm. Please consider attending and congratulating this year’s awardees.

Sessions

Friday, March 31, 2023

8:00 am - 9:00 am
Multi-Interest | S01

Positively Better Together
Manny Valenzuela

This session is not available for CE credit.


9:15 am - 10:45 am
Pediatric SLP | S02
Level of Learning: Intermediate

The SLPs Role in Breast/Body Feeding and Bottle Feeding Assessment
Maggie Sudimack, CCC-SLP, Lactation & Language, A.T. Still University Director of Clinical Education/Instructor.

Many therapists feel unprepared to assess proper latch when breast/body and bottle feeding even though our scope of practice covers pediatric dysphagia. A parent may come to SLPs in various settings for help regarding infant feeding. Parents often feel unsupported when they receive varying advice from professionals (Dykes & Williams, 1999), so it becomes essential for an SLP to be properly educated when developing a treatment plan for parents seeking help when breast or bottle feeding their infant. Some of the most common causes of infant feeding difficulties are nipple pain, adequate milk transfer, infant weight gain, gassiness, fussiness, infant fatigue, and overall infant discomfort. When breast feeding, these are common reasons that parents may switch to bottle feeding expressed breast milk (EBM) or using formula (Odom, et al., 2013). When assessing a latch, either on breast or bottle, there are key attributes to look for: lip flanging, curved cheek line, angle of mouth gape, nasal space, approach of infant’s mouth, and rocker jaw movement (Cadwell & Turner-Maffei, 2022). Assessing a latch is essential when addressing parental concerns because an infant’s latch can have a direct relationship to maternal/parental nipple comfort, milk supply, milk transfer, infant weight gain, and infant discomfort. In order to promote a proper latch, an SLP is able to suggest various techniques, such as adjusting position of infant, position of caregivers hands, bottle/nipple system, flow rate, adjusting feeding schedule, and educating parents how to read the infant’s cues when feeding (Mahurin-Smith & Genna, 2018; Shaker, 2018).

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • analyze latch on bottle or breast to determine what may be causing parental concern.
      • identify and analyze three possible causes of parental concern regarding latch on bottle or breast.
      • develop and implement a minimum of four intervention strategies with the family to improve breast and/or bottle feeding.

9:15 am - 10:45 am
Pediatric SLP | S03
Level of Learning: Introductory

Gimme a Break! Using Brain Breaks as an EBP
Mary Keeney, CCC-SLP, Arizona Department of Education
Mitch Galbraith, OTD, OTR/L, Arizona Department of Education
Margaret Egan, PT

Many of the students on our caseloads have difficulties attending, processing, and recalling information. Movement and brain breaks have great potential to help students learn and remember. Brain breaks can be based on movement, low-load cognitive tasks, or breathwork. All types of brain breaks have positive effects on executive function, attention and recall, math and reading, and may also reduce stress. In this session you will be given a collection of brain breaks curated by an occupational therapist, a physical therapist, and a speech-language pathologist. We will also share no- and low- prep strategies to quickly and easily choose and use brain breaks in any pediatric setting.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • inform others of the benefits of integrating brain breaks in the classroom, therapy room, and zoom room.
      • explain the three Bs framework of brain breaks and the corresponding research demonstrating positive impacts on student learning
      • use resources provided to choose and use brain breaks efficiently and effectively

9:15 am - 10:45 am
Multi-Interest | S04
Level of Learning: Intermediate

Pediatric TBI/Sports Concussions
Mo Mortazavi, MD, SPARCC Sports Medicine, Rehabilitation & Concussion Center

Mental fog fatigue, migraine, mood, vision & balance problems, dysautonomia, neck pain, and learning problems are all symptoms that may occur as a result of mTBI and complex concussions. This session will provide an overview of what is considered a simple versus a complex concussion, as well as how to subtype concussions. Concussion symptoms will be identified and case studies will be presented to solidify a deeper understanding of mTBI and concussions. Rehab protocol will be presented, including position statements. Academic impact and return to learn will be discussed, including school accommodations and guidelines for educators. Vestibular dysfunction and assessment will be included. Attendees will leave this session with an understanding of individualized and targeted treatments for management of complex concussions.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • Define Complex Concussions
      • Identify Concussion Profiles and Define Subtypes
      • Explain the Comprehensive Care Model for Concussion Management
      • Utilize Case Reviews and Consensus Summaries to Determine Plan of Care

9:15 am - 10:45 am
Pediatric SLP | S05
Level of Learning: Intermediate

The Detrimental Outcomes of Social Skills Training and an Alternative Neurodiversity-Affirming Conceptual Practice Framework for Social Communication, Part 1
Julie Roberts, MS, CCC-SLP, Therapist Neurodiversity Collective, Inc

Social Skills Training for autistic young people has been a standard autism intervention for decades. From a behavioral lens, speech-language pathologists define what appropriate social skills should “look like” based on arbitrary and often subjective standards of “typical”. Social Skills assessment, analysis, and treatment of autistic social communication target outcomes of “normalization" through explicit instructions, modeling, behavior rehearsal, feedback, and reinforcement. Presented by a formally late-identified Autistic SLP, this 3-hour seminar will provide an overview of The Neurodiversity-Affirming Conceptual Practice Framework of Social Communication (© 2019 - 2023 Julie Roberts), which is an evidence-based alternative intervention model to autistic social skills training, grounded in contemporary autism research. Topics include autistic social communication research, autistic cultural competence, clinical priorities, assessment, goals, and consideration for outcomes.

Time-Ordered Agenda

9:15- 9:25           Intro
9:25 – 9:55         Neurodiversity 101, Models of Disability
9:55 – 10:15        Autistic Trauma
10:15 -10:25        Dehumanizing Myths: Empathy and TOM
10:25 – 10:35      Autistic Stigma
10:35 – 10:45      Acceptance

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • participants will be able to identify primary differences between non-autistic (allistic) and autistic social communication and list 3 primary supporting contemporary research theories.
      • participants will be able to identify social skills goals that may impact trauma, and have harmful outcomes, and explain why based on supporting contemporary research evidence.
      • participants will be able to describe key considerations when assessing and planning for ethical, evidence-based, trauma-informed and neurodiversity-affirming intervention with autistic social communicators.

11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Pediatric SLP | S06
Level of Learning: Intermediate

The Detrimental Outcomes of Social Skills Training and an Alternative Neurodiversity-Affirming Conceptual Practice Framework for Social Communication, Part 2
Julie Roberts, MS, CCC-SLP, Therapist Neurodiversity Collective, Inc

Social Skills Training for autistic young people has been a standard autism intervention for decades. From a behavioral lens, speech-language pathologists define what appropriate social skills should “look like” based on arbitrary and often subjective standards of “typical”. Social Skills assessment, analysis, and treatment of autistic social communication target outcomes of “normalization" through explicit instructions, modeling, behavior rehearsal, feedback, and reinforcement. Presented by a formally late-identified Autistic SLP, this 3-hour seminar will provide an overview of The Neurodiversity-Affirming Conceptual Practice Framework of Social Communication (© 2019 - 2023 Julie Roberts), which is an evidence-based alternative intervention model to autistic social skills training, grounded in contemporary autism research. Topics include autistic social communication research, autistic cultural competence, clinical priorities, assessment, goals, and consideration for outcomes.

Time-Ordered Agenda

11:00 – 11:45:  Contemporary Research Overview

Monotropism
The Double Empathy Problem
Diversity in Social Intelligence
Autistic Masking Camouflaging, Adaptive Morphing

11:45-12:30: Assessment and Goal Writing: The Neurodiversity-Affirming Theoretical Framework of Social Communication

Components of Framework
Respectful Assessments
Social Skills Goals Makeovers

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • participants will be able to identify primary differences between non-autistic (allistic) and autistic social communication and list 3 primary supporting contemporary research theories.
      • participants will be able to identify social skills goals that may impact trauma, and have harmful outcomes, and explain why based on supporting contemporary research evidence.
      • participants will be able to describe key considerations when assessing and planning for ethical, evidence-based, trauma-informed and neurodiversity-affirming intervention with autistic social communicators.

11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Adult SLP | S07
Level of Learning: Intermediate

Primary Progressive Aphasia and Speech Pathology: What are We doing?
Daphne Phillips, PhD
Katherine (Katie) Shore, CCC-SLP

Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) is a syndrome that was first described in the literature over 100 years ago. A resurgence of publications on the topic began in 1982 with Mesulam as a prominent researcher in this area. PPA is a syndrome that is characterized by progressive loss of language in light of relatively stable cognitive abilities for at least the first 2 years. Individuals that have presented to care providers with these complaints typically undergo evaluations that may include brain imaging and neuropsychological testing. Many providers will also refer patients to Speech-Language Pathology for evaluation and treatment. There was minimal research found in the literature as to any evaluation or treatment protocols or dosage in speech pathology. This presentation will define PPA, provide an overview of the subtypes types of PPA, discuss options for evaluation and treatment and propose a prescriptive approach to managing this syndrome. In addition, the importance of the role of the SLP in diagnosis, treatment and support of the patients and their caregivers will be discussed.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • define PPA and its clinical subtypes.
      • discuss current research in the area of PPA and how it relates to the clinical practice of SLP.
      • improve clinical knowledge and decision making with patients with PPA and their caregivers.

11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Multi-Interest | S08
Level of Learning: Introductory

Supporting Mixed Status Families In Educational Settings
Gina Santos, CCC-SLP, Tucson Unified School District

Undocumented immigrants and their families are faced with deportation and detention without reasonable access to a path of citizenship or permanent residency. These actions result in family separation affecting children. Educational institutions, one of the primary settings engaging with impacted students, are forced to respond to the needs of struggling families and children with mixed status backgrounds. Speech language pathologists are essential members of special education teams faced with providing services to mixed status families facing challenging situations. Current research dedicated to understanding unique dynamics of mixed status families within educational and special education settings is useful to speech language pathologists as they develop educational plans targeted at long term communication and learning outcomes. Research indicates mixed status families benefit from: development of social networks with formal structures, individualized support at the school site in contrast to wider district initiatives, asset based approaches to develop child/ student/ family rapport and inclusivity, and ongoing professional development for cultural competency.

Time-Ordered Agenda

11:00-11:25         Introduction, Defining terms relating to mixed status families, demographics of population within our educational systems
11:25-11:50-       Research Re: Mixed Status  Families in Educational Settings
11:50-12:20         Discussion of Asset based model w/ examples
12:20-12:30         QA

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • define at a minimum of four terms related to immigration status.
      • state three ways to support Mixed Status families in educational settings.
      • list three strategies to encourage school/ special education team to develop support systems for mixed status families.

11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Multi-Interest | S09
Level of Learning: Introductory

Jeremy and Brenda’s: 20 Exciting Activities for the AAC Implementation
Jeremy Legaspi, CCC-SLP, PRC-Saltillo
Brenda DelMonte, CCC-SLP, Private Practice

Whether your service delivery model is one-on-one , a special education classroom, or inclusion in general education, planning activities that engage ALL learners can be challenging. When we provide students with a language foundation that supports increased social interaction and connection we empower them to communicate about topics they choose. This session will provide you with a customizable "toolbox" according to the interests, ideas, and experiences of each learner. Our goal in this session is to provide a variety of engaging activities that align with the AAC learner’s interests and allows them to take lead. Demonstrations of activities will be provided.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • List five websites that provide resources and ideas around AAC implementation.
      • Name at least three adapted toys or activities to improve alternative access to AAC.
      • state five AAC implementation ideas for one-on-one , special education classroom and general education settings.

2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Pediatric SLP | S10
Level of Learning: Introductory

Childhood Trauma: The Invisible Participant in Speech-Language Therapy Sessions
Nicole Hoopes, CCC-SLP, Ridge Zeller Therapy

The term “trauma” is often used in schools and academic conversations with little consensus on what the term means. This lack of clarity negatively impacts the ability of professionals to support clients with trauma histories. Researchers have begun using a central definition to precisely define trauma. This presentation will discuss and define trauma in reference to the 3 E’s: The type of event it is, how the person experiences the incident, and the long-term effect of the incident (Perry & Winfrey, 2021).

To support clients with trauma histories, one most understand the prevalence of trauma and its impact on the brain. This presentation will orientate participates to facts such as it is estimated that 40% of students in classrooms have trauma histories, and childhood trauma has the ability to impact many areas of cognitive development including: language, memory, attention, and executive functioning (Craig, 2016). Trauma impacts children differently, but the ones who experienced trauma severe enough and young enough often need speech-language support. Trauma later in childhood can impact executive functioning skills needed to access curriculum and make progress in speech-language therapy. Students who have experienced trauma are already in speech-language therapy rooms.

Supported by research from multiple fields, this presentation will provide the tools one needs to become a trauma-informed speech-language pathologist. The therapist will learn how to create a trauma sensitive room, areas to focus on during evaluations, how to use trauma sensitive behavior management techniques and specific direct instruction models to increase learning.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • define trauma and traumatic events.
      • define "state dependent functioning" and it's impact on learning.
      • recall three impacts of trauma on the brain.
      • identify at least five trauma-sensitive techniques to use in clinics and schools.

4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Pediatric SLP | S11
Level of Learning: Introductory

Adolescents With Developmental Language Disorder: Complex Sentence Assessment and Intervention
Colin Macpherson, MA, CCC-SLP, Midwestern University
Taylor Torongo, BS, Midwestern University
Atur Oraha, BS, Midwestern University
Elana Nicolia, BS, Midwestern University
Hoi Ku Tong, BS, Midwestern University

Speech-language pathologists are increasingly called upon to support the education performance of adolescents with language based learning disabilities. The language impairments exhibited by adolescents are subtle but can interfere with their success in the regular education classroom (Balthazar & Scott 2015; Balthazar & Scott, 2017). Language intervention services appropriate for adolescents entails knowledge of complex syntax and its development, procedures for assessing the complex syntax, and specific intervention approaches and strategies that improve the use of complex syntax in a variety of discourse genres including narrative and exposition. Additionally, the oral language skills children diagnosed with dyslexia, a comorbid language disability, are not routinely assessed and may lead to less effective language intervention when oral language impairments are not addressed.

The purpose of this seminar will be to provide participants with an overview of complex syntax, assessment procedures for both oral and written language use, and the use of Complex Sentence Intervention (CSI; Balthazar & Scott, 2017) in both clinical and school settings. The use of norm-referenced (e.g., Test of Language and Literacy Skills; Nelson, Plante, Helm Estabrooks, and Holtz, 2015) and criterion referenced measures including c-unit, t-unit, and clausal density analyses (Nippold, 2022) will be discussed. Practical methods for developing personally relevant materials for CSI as well as actual implementation of CSI with adolescents will be presented through two case studies. Upon completion of the session, participants should be able to provide assessment and intervention services that address the needs of adolescents with language impairment.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • identify norm and criterion referenced language measures to use with adolescents with language impairment.
      • describe how to use the internet to identify and develop personally relevant materials for complex sentence intervention
      • describe the metalinguistic procedures used in complex sentence intervention

2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Multi-Interest | S12
Level of Learning: Introductory

Clinical Supervision: A Matter of Perspective
Joshua Breger, MS, CCC-SLP, Arizona State University
Elizabeth Trueba, MS, CCC-SLP, Arizona State University

Clinical supervision is a challenging and rewarding way for an experienced audiologist or speech-language pathologist to give back to the profession. It is a collaborative experience in which the supervisor and supervisee should put in equal efforts for the most successful outcome. This session will investigate the perspectives of both parties involved and provide effective strategies for improving the supervisory experience. This session will also explore ways to include accommodations or accessibility options for supervisees with neurological or physical differences as well as ways to welcome supervisees from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. In addition, updates on supervision requirements and responsibilities will be reviewed. Professionals should leave this session feeling refreshed and empowered to guide the next generation of leaders in audiology and speech-language pathology.

Time-Ordered Agenda

2:00 – 2:05           Introductions and Review of Learning Objectives
2:05 – 2:15           Requirements for Supervision: AuD, SLP and SLPA
2:15 – 2:25           Requirements for Certification: AuD, SLP and SLPA
2:25 – 2:45           Review of Student Perspectives on Supervision with Case Studies and Discussion
2:45 – 3:05           Review of Supervisor Perspectives on Supervision with Case Studies and Discussion
3:05 – 3:15           Special Considerations Related to Accommodations
3:15 – 3:25           Wrap-Up and Resources
3:25 – 3:30           Additional QA

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • recognize requirements for supervision of audiology, SLP and SLPA students, SLPAs and Clinical Fellows
      • list at least three ways to establish a successful clinical experience for both the supervisor and supervisee
      • generate possible solutions for common clinical supervision dilemmas

2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Multi-Interest | S13
Level of Learning: Intermediate

Remediation of 7 Common Error Sounds Using the SATPAC Approach, Part 1
Stephen Sacks, CCC-SLP, SATPAC Speech

Most of the speech sound disorders involve the S and R sounds and to a lesser extent the K,G,L,SH,CH,J, and TH sounds. The presentor will show how to effectively and efficiently remediate these speech sounds. Peer-reviewed studies involving the S and R sounds using the SATPAC Program and Approach have shown that these sounds can be remediated in 5 hours or less using RTI and weekly individual 15 minute sessions keeping most of these students out of Special Education.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • recall the two types of constriction necessary for successful /r/ production.
      • recall the exercise that has been successful in correct placement for the /s/ sound.
      • recall techniques for successful remediating the most common error sounds.

4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Multi-Interest | S14
Level of Learning: Intermediate

Remediation of 7 Common Error Sounds Using the SATPAC Approach, Part 2
Stephen Sacks, CCC-SLP

Most of the speech sound disorders involve the S and R sounds and to a lesser extent the K,G,L,SH,CH,J, and TH sounds. The presentor will show how to effectively and efficiently remediate these speech sounds. Peer-reviewed studies involving the S and R sounds using the SATPAC Program and Approach have shown that these sounds can be remediated in 5 hours or less using RTI and weekly individual 15 minute sessions keeping most of these students out of Special Education.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • recall the two types of constriction necessary for successful /r/ production.
      • recall the exercise that has been successful in correct placement for the /s/ sound.
      • recall techniques for successful remediating the most common error sounds.

4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Multi-Interest | S15
Level of Learning: Introductory

Cultural Competence and Treatment in Pediatric Gender Affirming Voice Therapy
Lisa Melady, MS, CCC-SLP, Phoenix Children's Hospital

The connection between voice and quality of life within the gender expansive population has been well documented. People that identify as LGBTQIA+ have frequently reported that their voices do not represent their gender, and they would feel safer and more confident with gender-affirming voice modification. Voice and communication therapy may help alleviate gender misidentification and be a positive, motivating step toward achieving gender expression goals. The number of pediatric gender affirming voice clients is increasing rapidly. The goal of this presentation will be to introduce the Speech Language Pathologist to basic cultural competence for working with this population, as well as provide training in multiple areas of gender affirming voice therapy. Presenters will outline current terminology used in this population. Prepubescent and postpubescent laryngeal anatomy will be reviewed. Establishing voice therapy goals for transgender men, transgender women and non-binary clients will be highlighted. This presentation will explore therapy techniques relating to pitch, resonance, intonation, articulation and non-verbal communication for use with this population. Effects of puberty suppressive medication and hormone replacement therapy on the voice will be introduced. Discussion will also include use of the VisiPitch software system for obtaining baseline and therapeutic voice measurements.

Time-Ordered Agenda

4:00-4:10    Roles and Responsibilities of the SLP
4:10-4:25    Anatomy differences
4:25-4:35    Endocrinology Involvement
4:35-4:55    Gender Affirming Voice Assessment
4:55-5:20    Gender Affirming Voice Therapy
5:20-5:30    Establishing Goals for Therapy

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • identify two differences in prepubescent and postpubescent laryngeal anatomy
      • demonstrate the ability to develop two appropriate, measurable goals for gender affirming voice therapy.
      • explain three relevant therapy techniques used in gender affirming voice therapy
      • demonstrate basic cultural competence for working with the adolescent gender affirming voice therapy population

2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Multi-Interest | S16
Level of Learning: Intermediate

The SLP: Serving Individuals Across the Gender Spectrum
Janet Hawley, ClinScD, CCC-SLP, University of Arizona

This session will focus on the dynamic and rewarding practice of providing gender-affirming voice/communication services to individuals across the gender spectrum. Novice and experienced voice clinicians are welcome. The presentation will include discussion of effective and efficient ways to: objectively and perceptually assess baseline voice/communication skills; assist your gender non-conforming clients in identifying treatment goals; and measure treatment outcomes in a holistic meaningful way. Several innovative voice/communication treatment models will be reviewed which share a focus on supporting your clients’ transitions and maximizing outcomes in a cost-effective manner. This session will also address cultural competence and creating a safe and supportive clinic environment for your clients.

Time-Ordered Agenda

2:00-2:10         Introduction: Voice and Communication Affirmation in transwomen, transmen, and gender expansive individuals

2:10-2:30         EBP evaluation

                               Interview

                               Acoustic measures

                               Perceptual measures

                               Surveys: listener, self-surveys,

                               Goal setting

2:30-2:50         EBP treatment to support congruency in voice and communication

                               Voice treatment focused on incorporation of home program

                               Non-verbals/physical presentation

                               Verbal language

2:50-3:10         Evaluation and Treatment Issues Specific to:

                               Transmen/voice and communication masculinization

                               Gender expansive/non-binary

                               Adolescent clients

3:10-3:20          Addressing diversity and inclusion

3:20-3:30          Questions

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • describe a method to identify treatment goals for potential clients across the gender spectrum.
      • list the components of a thorough client-centered voice/communication evaluation
      • describe a voice affirmation treatment model that incorporates mobile technology in a home program to optimize treatment outcomes
      • describe three self-rating forms for measuring baseline status and progress through gender-affirming voice/communication care.

4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Pediatric SLP | S17
Level of Learning: Introductory

The Price is Right- FREE Assistive Technology Tools for Schools
Mary Keeney, CCC-SLP, Arizona Department of Education
Mitch Galbraith, OTD, OTR/L, Arizona Department of Education
Margaret Egan, PT

A common misconception about assistive technology is that it is always a budget-buster. But is that true? Not always! Come to this session to learn about FREE and easily available options to support students who struggle with literacy, math, and executive function. These same tools can be used as a part of Universal Design for Learning (UDL), IEPs, transition plans, or 504s. Feel FREE to attend this session presented by members of the ADE/ESS AT team- you might even win a FREE prize.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • demonstrate knowledge of the definition of assitive technology and the laws mandating its inclusion in Individualize Education Plans.
      • identify at least three free assistive technology tools to use immediately in practice.
      • identify at least three resources to assist with the selection and implementation of assitive technology tools.


Saturday, April 1, 2023

8:00 am - 9:30 am
Pediatric SLP | S18
Level of Learning: Introductory

Bring Back the Fun!
Amy Hill, CCC-SLP, Light Street Solutions, Estrella Mountain Community College
Mary Keeney, CCC-SLP, Arizona Department of Education

Mary and Amy are back! The research tells us that it is critical that students practice a target skill at a high frequency in each session in order to progress. But when you already feel pressed for time, and you are working with mixed groups, how can you engage and motivate all your students to participate at such a high level? Come to this session to see dozens of therapy activities and reinforcers that can make therapy FUN for everyone- including you! Amy and Mary have collected these ideas and activities from SLPs and SLPAs working in schools all across Arizona, but they can easily be used in clinics and in homes as well. Session is most geared towards grades K-5.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • cite research regarding the effect of practice on progress towards therapy goals.
      • explain to others why play and fun increase the effectiveness of speech therapy.
      • locate and use the collected resources from this session.

8:00 am - 9:30 am
Adult SLP | S19
Level of Learning: Intermediate

But Everything Gets Stuck! Muscle Tension Dysphagia, Chronic Throat Clear and What to do Next When the Swallow Looks Normal
Aubrey Dunlap, MS, CCC-SLP, Midwestern University

This session will address a common complaint of the medical SLP: what to do when a patient comes in with a seemingly normal swallow on instrumentation yet complains of globus sensation, sore throat, chronic throat clearing, and a host of other symptoms. The speaker will dive into the current evidence and expert clinical opinions on managing muscle tension dysphagia and similar laryngeal tension-related diagnoses. This session will include practical information for the medical SLP to use the following Monday, including detailed therapy options and specific supports for patients who may feel their concerns have been invalidated by other providers.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • define muscle tension dysphagia.
      • describe common symptoms of muscle tension dysphagia and related laryngeal tension disorders.
      • identify three therapeutic techniques for muscle tension dysphagia.

8:00 am - 9:30 am
Multi-Interest | S20
Level of Learning: Introductory

Building Interdisciplinary Program Around Autism
Maria Dixon, MA, CCC-SLP, Arizona State University
Erin Rotheram-Fuller, PhD, Arizona State University

Students with complex disabilities require coordinated care to address communication challenges. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and educators are in a unique position to jointly support the communication goals of these students through Interprofessional Clinical Practice (IPCP). Unfortunately, most professionals are not prepared during training, nor supported in professional settings, to engage in IPCP. Existing Interprofessional Education (IPE) and IPCP models show promise in training professionals to work more effectively together before and after they enter the field, but they are not prevalent nor well-evaluated enough yet in education to draw strong conclusions. The Interdisciplinary Multicultural Professional Autism Clinical Training (IMPACT) Program prepares pre-professional service providers to use a collaborative, inclusive approach to service delivery for students with special needs. Key characteristics, strategies, and benefits of existing training and practice models for SLPs and educators are reviewed.

Time-Ordered Agenda

08:008:05 Welcoming Remarks and overview of the session  
8:058:10 Virtual survey questions of interprofessional practices 
8:109:00 Lecture/presentation 
9:009:10 Attendee activity
9:109:20 Presentation of case-based problem-solving presentation and discussion 
9:209:30 Overall session Q&A 

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • List the Interprofessional Clinical Practice (IPCP) principles for collaborative practice
      • Describe barriers to Interprofessional Clinical Practice (IPCP)
      • Describe methods to increase Interprofessional Clinical Practice (IPCP) and Interprofessional Education (IPE) for better student outcomes

8:00 am - 9:30 am
Multi-Interest | S21
Level of Learning: Intermediate

Aural Rehabilitation for Children and Adults With Cochlear Implants
Carla Zimmerman, CCC-SLP, Zimmerman Speech & Hearing Center

Cochlear implant candidacy has expanded in recent years. Candidacy criterial now includes individuals with less severe hearing losses and higher preoperative speech recognition. Non-traditional cochlear implant candidates are demonstrating significant benefit from cochlear implantation, including children and adults who may benefit from bimodal hearing – a CI on one ear and a traditional hearing aid on the other. Children and adults with single-sided deafness are now receiving cochlear implants as well. With the increased expansion in cochlear implantation, understanding post-implant aural rehabilitation becomes crucial. However, many audiologists and speech-language pathologists feel unprepared. This presentation will describe aural rehabilitation for children with congenital hearing loss, for adults with postlingual hearing loss, and for individuals with single-sided deafness. Recommendations to maximize outcomes will be provided.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • design a developmentally appropriate protocol to develop auditory skills in children with congenital hearing loss.
      • develop an effective protocol to foster auditory skills in adults who have experience with acoustic listening.
      • describe the challenges of building auditory skills in the ear of individuals with unilateral hearing loss who receive a cochlear implant, and list recommendations for auditory rehabilitation.

10:00 am - 11:30 am
Multi-Interest | S22
Level of Learning: Introductory

Gender Affirming Care for Youth: Voice and Occupational Therapy Group
Lisa Melady, MS, CCC-SLP, Phoenix Children's Hospital
Katie Appelbe, OTD, OTR/L, Phoenix Children's Hospital

The number of transgender and gender-expansive youth in need of gender affirming voice and occupational therapy support is increasing rapidly. The Gender Support Program at Phoenix Children's Hospital is striving to educate community providers on the importance of supporting the physical, mental, social and emotional health of this growing population. This educational session will summarize the initiation of an innovative group therapy program developed for adolescent and young adult clients who participate in the Gender Support Program at Phoenix Children's Hospital. This group is led by a speech-language pathologist, who specialized in gender affirming voice treatment, and an occupational therapist. Outcome measures will be administered at the commencement and conclusion of the group therapy program in order to measure effectiveness of this therapeutic process. These measure effectiveness of this therapeutic process. These measures will focus on evaluating changes in the emotional, physical and social functioning of the participants across occupations. Specific, measurable, individual goals for voice and occupational therapy will be developed and monitored throughout the 6-week program. The main purpose of this therapeutic group setting is to provide a safe place to practice gender affirming voice goals, social interactions and occupation-based tasks with peers while fostering supportive social interaction between participants. Providing a group setting should offer superior opportunities to generalize specific therapeutic goals that cannot be met in an individual session.

TIme-Ordered Agenda

10:00-10:10    Introduction
10:10-10:20    Healthcare Equality
10:20-10:30    Inclusive Patient Care
10:30-10:35    Gender Diverse Youth and Mental Health
10:35-10:45    Gender Support Program
10:45-11:00    SLP and OT Roles in Gender Support
11:00-11:15    Group Development
11:15-11:30    Group Goals

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • demonstrate knowledge on how to structure a Voice/OT Gender affirming care therapy group
      • identify two outcome measure that are appropriate for use with a Voice/OT Gender affirming care therapy group
      • identify two measurable voice therapy and two measurable occupational therapy goals appropriate for Voice/OT Gender affirming care therapy group
      • demonstrate the knowledge of insurance billing codes needed to be authorized for patients participating in group therapy for voice/OT

10:00 am - 11:30 am
Adult SLP | S23
Level of Learning: Intermediate

Head and Neck Cancer and the SLP.  What do I need to know?
Leah Mackie, MSLP, CCC-SLP,

Head and Neck cancer rehabilitation necessitates the SLP have knowledge of the methods for treatment including surgery, reconstruction, chemotherapy, radiation and immunotherapy. This seminar will cover the medical treatment of oral, oral pharyngeal and laryngeal cancer and the role of the SLP in each stage of the treatment. Common strategies used to improve swallowing and speech function including examples of modified barium swallows and video of treatment and care of altered airways will be discussed. The benefit of adjunctive therapies such as lymphedema and trismus will also be addressed.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • understand tumor staging in Head and Neck Cancer.
      • list the different types of altered airways and the equipment that is used in each type of airway.
      • understand commonly used strategies to improve airway protection for swallowing in the head and neck population.
      • understand how to evaluate for tracheoesophageal valve leakage in a total laryngectomy patient and what to do for it.

10:00 am - 11:30 am
Multi-Interest | S24
Level of Learning: Introductory

Customizing AAC for Individual/Complex Communication Needs
Danika Stampfel, CCC-SLP, Norther Arizona University
Heather Joy Magdelano, Parent
Kristy Gibson, CCC-SLP, Tobii Dynavox
Jeremy Legaspi, CCC-SLP, Prentke Romich
Douglas Cutler, CCC-SLP, Smartbox

Individuals with diverse or complex communication needs, including cortical visual impairment (CVI), dual sensory impairment/deaf blindness and/or physical/motor needs may have varying access to communication or literacy technology across the day. Adaptations and modifications are now widely available for early successes and can be individualized to meet family & individual needs.

This panel presentation will include a family member, provider (SLP) and consultant perspectives on practical options for starting and continuing to modify implementation of AAC in daily contexts, with consideration for sensory, hearing, vision and motor modifications.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • list two to three barriers to beginning AAC implementation that may impact families in the home setting.
      • describe two to three scenarios effectively supported by low-tech communication.
      • list three features of dynamic/high tech AAC to be considered for individuals multiple sensory impairment.

10:00 am - 11:30 am
Audiology | S25
Level of Learning: Introductory

Expanded FDA Criteria for Cochlear Implantation in Peds and Adults
Shawn Stevens, MD FACS, Barrow Neurological Institute

Hearing loss not amenable to use of traditional amplification may require work up for cochlear implant candidacy. In the last 15 years, rapid advances in microtized technology, materials science development, and clinical outcomes research have greatly expanded the potential pool of patients that might benefit from cochlear implantation. The goal of this presentation is to update the audience on key recent changes to FDA/Medicare candidacy criteria for cochlear implantation in both the pediatric and adult populations. Emphasis will be given to highlighting key scientific developments that have supported the approval of these new criteria.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

      • Describe key changes to cochlear implant candidacy criteria in the infant and pediatric population
      • Describe key changes to cochlear implant candidacy criteria in the adult population
      • Identify critical new developments in the biomedical design and fabrication of cochlear implants that are advancing the boundaries of this technology and who can benefit from it.

2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Pediatric SLP | S26
Level of Learning: Introductory

Supporting Clients With Feeding Disorders In the Home and School: How SLPs Can Work Together
Dena Berg, CCC-SLP,

This presentation will discuss Responsive Feeding Therapy (RFT) and how RFT can be utilized in both the home and school settings for clients with Pediatric Feeding Disorder (PFD). In this presentation, you will learn strategies for home-based and school-based SLPs to work together to better support clients/students with PFD.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • name the four domains of Pediatric Feeding Disorder and how SLPs can help children in each domain
      • utilize strategies to better provide support for people with PFD in the home and school
      • define Responsive Feeding Therapy and provide insight into how to treat students/clients with PFD using RFT

2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Adult SLP | S27
Level of Learning: Intermediate

Bilinguals and Traumatic Brain Injury: Research, Implications, and Recommendations
Tamiko Azuma, PhD, College of Health Solutions, Arizona State University
Ileana Ratiu, PhD, CCC-SLP, College of Health Solutions, Arizona State University

Adults with acquired traumatic brain injury often show deficits in executive function abilities, such as inhibition and task switching. Executive functions underlie language control processes in bilingual and multilingual individuals. As a result, these individuals can display additional language difficulties, including problems switching between languages and cross-language intrusions. Common clinical assessments were designed for monolingual individuals and are less likely to reflect these deficits. In our research, we have assessed bilingual-specific deficits using a combination of behavioral and physiological measures.  Across multiple studies, we have found that bilinguals with a history of traumatic brain injury can show subtle deficits in executive function, which are associated with language control errors.  Further, current executive function assessments do not capture these deficits and do not have adequate specificity for bilingual individuals.  This presentation will cover recent research findings and patterns of language deficits and recovery following an acquired brain injury in bilinguals as well as considerations for assessment and treatment.

Time-Ordered Agenda

2:00 – 2:20 Introduction to bilingualism and current research
2:20 – 2:30 Language loss after acquired neurogenic impact, general patterns and case studies
2:30 – 2:50 Our research examining language loss in bilinguals with traumatic brain injury
2:50 – 3:00 Patterns and factors of language recovery post acquired neurogenic impact
3:00 – 3:20 Considerations for assessment and treatment of bilinguals with acquired neurogenic impact
3:20 – 3:30 Q&A

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

      • Describe the relationship between higher-order cognitive abilities and bilingual language control.
      • Identify types of language control deficits observed in bilinguals with a history of traumatic brain injury
      • Recognize the patterns of deficits and recovery that bilinguals may experience following a brain injury
      • Describe best practices for assessing and treating bilinguals with brain injury

2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Audiology | S28
Level of Learning: Introductory

Incorporating OTC Hearing Aids into Clinical Practices
Elizabeth Walker, PhD, University of Iowa

With the creation of a new regulatory class of over-the-counter (OTC) hearing aids, many audiologists are preparing to, or recently began to, incorporate OTCs- and patients using this technology- into their clinical practices. While OTC hearing aids have the potential to increase accessibility and affordability of hearing loss treatment for millions of Americans with perceived mild to moderate hearing loss, many individuals will still benefit from the support of an audiologist. This course will provide a detailed analysis of the FDA’s final rule creating a new regulatory class of OTC hearing aids and updating the regulatory framework for prescription hearing aids, present service delivery models for servicing patients with OTC hearing aids, and discuss ways in which audiologists can market their professional expertise and service offerings. This course will also focus on ASHA’s advocacy efforts around ensuring appropriate consumer protection and device efficacy for OTCs and accessibility for prescription hearing aids. Finally, participants will get to tour ASHA’s OTC toolkit and learn how to utilize the resources available to professionals to educate the public and other health care professionals on appropriate use of OTC hearing aids and the importance of audiologic assessment and hearing loss intervention.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • summarize research and legislation resulting in the FDA’s creation of OTC hearing aids
      • define OTC and Prescription hearing aids
      • summarize OTC regulatory requirements
      • plan for clinical integration of OTCs

2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Pediatric SLP | S29
Level of Learning: Introductory

Selective Mutism: What SLPs Need to Know, Part 1
Alicia Goodman, PhD, NCSP, Simply Psychology LLC
Melissa White, MA, CCC-SLP

This session will address when, why, and how speech-language pathologists might work with children with selective mutism. Have you ever wondered how speech-language pathologists should be involved in working with children with selective mutism? In this session, we will discuss what selective mutism is, why and how a speech-language pathologist might be involved on a child's team, what to do if a family concerned about selective mutism comes to your school or clinic, and strategies for assessing and interacting with children with selective mutism. Relevant to both clinic and school-based SLPs cases will be presented.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • define selective mutism (SM)
      • describe why speech-language pathologists might work with children with SM
      • describe possible services in clinic and school settings for children with SM
      • demonstrate basic strategies for interacting with children with SM

3:45 pm - 5:15 pm
Pediatric SLP | S30
Level of Learning: Introductory

Selective Mutism: What SLPs Need to Know, Part 2
Alicia Goodman, PhD, NCSP, Simply Psychology LLC
Melissa White, MA, CCC-SLP

This session will address when, why, and how speech-language pathologists might work with children with selective mutism. Have you ever wondered how speech-language pathologists should be involved in working with children with selective mutism? In this session, we will discuss what selective mutism is, why and how a speech-language pathologist might be involved on a child's team, what to do if a family concerned about selective mutism comes to your school or clinic, and strategies for assessing and interacting with children with selective mutism. Relevant to both clinic and school-based SLPs cases will be presented.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • define selective mutism (SM)
      • describe why speech-language pathologists might work with children with SM
      • describe possible services in clinic and school settings for children with SM
      • demonstrate basic strategies for interacting with children with SM

3:45 pm - 5:15 pm
Audiology | S31
Level of Learning: Intermediate

Cochlear Implantation: Criteria, Considerations and Clinical Relevance
Lindsay Shroyer, AuD

The aspect of cochlear implants is a changing landscape in the field of audiology. The presentation will focus on updated implantation criteria, considerations for patients with progressing hearing loss, communicating referrals and outcomes of cochlear implantation. Different manufacturers will be discussed as well as any FDA indications based on manufacturer. Case presentations will be presented demonstrating different outcomes in patients followed by our clinic.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • define cochlear implant FDA and Medicare criteria.
      • list at least two considerations for referring for cochlear implant consideration.
      • name at least two cochlear implant manufacturers.
      • discuss potential outcome benefits from cochlear implantation.

3:45 pm - 5:15 pm
Adult SLP | S32
Level of Learning: Intermediate

Rethinking Dysphagia Management Across the Continuum of Care: What are We Doing, Why and How Should We be Implementing Best Practices?
Kathleen R. Cazzato, BCS-S, University of Arizona

Best practices in dysphagia management continue to evolve with advances in research findings. As practicing clinicians it can be challenging not just to keep up with these new developments, but also to 1) effectively implement new options into clinical practice, and 2) know when it is and is not feasible to do so based on clinical caseload and setting. This session is designed to be an interactive opportunity to explore and discuss these issues. We will review; what are we being encouraged to do in terms of best practices across areas of dysphagia management? what are we doing and why? How does this change by setting? when does it make sense to implement a change in practice? When does it not?

You will be encouraged to bring your questions and your great ideas!!!

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • describe current options for best practices for a comprehensive evaluation of dysphagia
      • describe three ways these practices might need to be modified based on patient variable and/or setting.
      • identify a potential opportunity and/or a potential barrier for implementing a new methodology into current practice

3:45 pm - 5:15 pm
Pediatric SLP | S33
Level of Learning: Intermediate

SLP/SLPA Supervision: What You Need To Know
Lisa Kerrigan, CCC-SLP
Erin Gant, BA

This session will discuss the ethical guidelines for appropriate collaboration of speech-language pathologists (SLP) and speech-language pathologist assistants (SLPA). This session will review current regulations and recommendations regarding the supervision and the use of support personnel in the field. It will discuss state/local regulations regarding SLPAs and recommendations from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). This session will provide effective tools and strategies for clinical supervision.

Time-Ordered Agenda

3:45-3:50 Introductions and Learning Outcomes
3:50-4:00 Requirements of an SLPA
4:00-4:05 Kahoot - True/False - What SLPAs can/cannot do?
4:05-4:15 SLPA Can/Cannot responsibilities
4:15-4:30 Supervision requirements
4:30-4:45 Direct and Indirect supervision
4:45-4:50 Supervision/Feedback Tips
4:50- 5:05 Arizona State Requirements
5:05 -5:15 Question and Answer Session

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • discuss what is within and outside the scope of responsibilities of SLPAs who work under the supervision of SLPs.
      • describe SLP and SLPA supervision requirements and recommendations.
      • identify strategies for best practices for implementation of the SLP and SLPA model.

12:45 pm- 1:45 pm
Multi-Interest | S34
Level of Learning: Introductory

Ethics for Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists: ASHA Procedures and Resources
Elizabeth Walker, PhD, CCC-A/SLP

This session will focus on skill development in ethics related to the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology.  A member of the ASHA Board of Directors will discuss components of the ASHA Code of Ethics, identify procedures for filing and responding to ethical complaints. The session will also provide examples of ethical violations and possible sanctions according the ASHA Code of Ethics.  Finally, this session will facilitate the identification of resources related to professional ethics available through the ASHA National Office.

Time-Ordered Agenda

12:45-12:55  Overview and Background of ASHA Code of Ethics
12:55-1:20    Code of Ethics revisions
1:20-1:30      Ethical Dilemmas and Ethical Decision Making
1:30-1:40      Breakout discussions and Case studies
1:40-1:45      Board of Ethics Adjudicated Findings and Wrap Up

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • Describe components of the ASHA code of ethics, including principles and rules.
      • Identify procedures for filing and responding to ethical complaints
      • Describe examples of ethical violations and sanctions according to the ASHA Code of Ethics
      • Identify resources available through ASHA National Office.

ArSHA 2023 | Featured Speakers

<strong>Manuel O. Valenzuela, EdD (Keynote Speaker)</strong><br/><em>Positively Better Together </em> - Friday March 31 from 8:00 am-9:00 am.

Since 2010, Dr. Valenzuela has served as the superintendent of the 6,400 student Sahuarita Unified School District. Dr. Valenzuela was in the first cohort to complete the National Superintendent Certification Program from the American Association of School Administrators (AASA). In 2015, Dr. Valenzuela was named the All-Arizona Superintendent of the Year for Large Districts. His superintendency has been highlighted by leading his district through significant growth, developing a strong strategic directions plan, building strong collaborative partnerships with diverse stakeholders in the region, expansion and increasing access to Advanced Placement (AP) programs, expansion of Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs, and working with institutions of higher education to support preservice professional training and development of teachers.

Dena Berg, CCC-SLP<br /><em>Supporting Clients With Feeding Disorders In The Home and School: How SLP's Can Work Together</em> - Saturday, April 1 from 2:00 pm-3:30 pm.

Dena has been a Speech-Language Pathologist for 10 years working in both home and school settings. Currently, Dena works for Arizona Advanced Therapy providing home-based therapies for clients of all ages. While she works with clients who have different therapy needs, her passion is in working with children with Pediatric Feeding Disorder using a responsive feeding approach. Dena was previously part of a mentorship cohort for professionals through Feeding Matters, and she is currently working on a multidisciplinary feeding book alongside a Registered Dietitian and Occupational Therapist.

Leah Mackie, MSLP, CCC-SLP <br /><em> Head and Neck Cancer and the SLP. What do I need to know?</em> - Saturday, April 1 from 11:00 am – 11:30 am.

Leah Mackie is a clinical speech language pathologist at Banner MD Anderson. She has been practicing for 30 years, specializing in Head and Neck Cancer Rehabilitation for the last 20 years. She is trained in acute post-surgical care of HNC and ICU patients, MBS, Trismus, TEP and laryngectomy rehabilitation as well as OP rehab for the radiation/chemotherapy patient. She has also attained certification in Head and Neck Lymphedema. She has trained and mentored students and staff as well as established protocols, policies, and programs in the area of head and neck cancer both in Canada and in the USA. In 2012 she joined the staff at Banner MD Anderson and helped start the Speech Language Pathology Cancer Program.

Erin Gant, BA, SLPA<br /><em>Supervision: What you need to know</em> - Saturday, April 1 from 3:45 pm-5:15 pm.

Erin Gant is a Speech Language Pathologist Assistant in a school-based setting. She received a BA in Sociology from Arizona State University in 2002 and her SLPA license and certificate from Estrella Mountain Community College in 2015. Erin has been an SLPA serving students from preschool to high school in the public school setting for 7 years.

Lisa Kerrigan, MS, CCC-SLP, SLP/SLPA <br /><em>Supervision: What you need to know</em> - Saturday, April 1 from 3:45 pm-5:15 pm.

Lisa Kerrigan is a certified Speech-Language Pathologist (SLP). She has more than 13 years of experience as a Speech-Language Pathologist. She received a bachelor's degree in Communication Science & Disorders and master’s degree in Speech-Language Pathology from Marywood University. She has been an SLP in the private and school-based setting since 2010. She has experience working with a variety of communication disorders. She provides clinical supervision for CFYs and SLPAs in the areas of school-based speech and language interventions.

Julie Roberts, CCC-SLP <br /><em>The Neurodiversity-Affirming Conceptual Practice Framework for Social Communication Part l & ll</em> - Friday, March 31, from 9:15 am- 10:45 am -and- 11:00am-12:30pm.

Julie Roberts, is a formally identified Autistic M.S., CCC-SLP founded Therapist Neurodiversity Collective on January 11, 2018. Professional experiences: public schools, practice owner for 7 years, multi-state Clinical Director, and National Field Director of Corporate Compliance in post-acute rehab. Julie’s articles and educational resources have reached over three-quarters of a million people.

Steven Sacks, CCC-SLP<br /> <em>Remediation of & 7 Common Error Sounds Using the SATPAC Approach Part l & ll</em> - Friday, March 31 from 2:00 pm-3:30 pm and 4:00 pm -5:30 pm.

Stephen Sacks has 42 years’ experience as an SLP working with school-age students and is the developer of the SATPAC Program and Approach for remediation of speech sound disorders. He is the 2011 recipient of the ASH Foundation Van Hattum Award for outstanding commitment and contribution in the schools.

Joshua Breger, MS, CCC-SLP<br /><em>Clinical Supervision: A Matter of Perspective</em> - March 31 from 2:00 pm-3:30 pm.

Joshua Breger is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the College of Health Solutions at ASU and the Clinic Director of the ASU Speech and Hearing Clinic. Prior to ASU he worked in the acute-care setting with special interests in dysphagia, TBI, and medically complex cases. Joshua currently supervises and teachers graduate students in the Communication Disorders Program.

Elizabeth Trueba, MS, CCC-SLP <br /><em>Clinical Supervision: A Matter of Perspective</em> - March 31 from 2:00 pm-3:30 pm.

Elizabeth Trueba is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the College of Health Solutions at ASU. She spent her early career working as a speech-language pathologist in the medical setting. She now supervises and teaches graduate students in the Communication Disorders program. Areas of particular interest include Parkinson’s, TBI, aphasia and matters related to diversity, equity and inclusion.

Tamiko Azuma, PhD<br /><em>Bilinguals and Traumatic Brain Injury: Research, Implications, and Recommendations</em> - Saturday, April 1 from 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm.

Dr. Azuma received her PhD in Psychology and completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the National Center for Neurogenic Communication Disorders. She is currently an Associate Professor of Speech and Hearing Science in the ASU College of Health Solutions. Her research focuses on cognitive processing in healthy adults and individuals with acquired neurogenic disorders.

Ileana Ratiu, PhD, CCC-SLP<br /><em>Bilinguals and Traumatic Brain Injury: Research, Implications, and Recommendations</em> - Saturday, April 1 from 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm.

Dr. Ratiu, is a Clinical Associate Professor and the Program Director for the M.S. in Communication Disorders. She completed her M.S. in Communication Disorders and Ph.D. in Speech and Hearing Science at Arizona State University. As a licensed speech-language pathologist, she works with patients with a history of traumatic brain injury and stroke. Broadly, her research examines differences in executive function, memory, language processing, and reading comprehension in monolingual and bilingual adults with acquired neurogenic disorders using both behavioral and physiological (i.e., eye tracking) measures.

Kathleen R. Cazzato MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-S<br /><em>Rethinking Dysphagia Management Across the Continuum of Care: What are we doing, why, and how should we be implementing best practices?</em> - Saturday, April 1 from 3:34 pm-5:15 pm.

Kathleen R. Cazzato is an Associate Clinical Professor at the University of Arizona and a Board Certified Specialist in Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders. She received both her undergraduate and graduate level education at Northwestern University. She has been a Medical Speech-Language Pathologist across the continuum of care for over 20 years. In her current role, she provides both classroom and clinical education for graduate students in speech-language pathology in the areas of Dysphagia and Medical Speech-Language Pathology. Her current clinical work focuses on outpatient dysphagia management in affiliation with the Banner University Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery.

Aubrey Dunlap, CCC-SLP<br /><em>But Everything Gets Stuck! Muscle Tension Dysphagia, Chronic Throat Clear and What to do Next When the Swallow Looks Normal</em> - Saturday, April 1, from 8:00 am-9:30 am.

Aubrey Dunlap is a Clinical Assistant Professor at Midwestern University. She completed her master’s degree in speech-language pathology at Nazareth College of Rochester in upstate New York. Aubrey specializes in voice and swallowing disorders, with a focus on head and neck cancer, including laryngectomy management. She has worked primarily in acute care hospitals and outpatient clinics, spending much of her career in the trauma, neuro, and COVID ICUs. She has advanced training in videolaryngostroboscopy, Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallow, and Modified Barium Swallow studies. Aubrey has taught graduate and undergraduate courses in dysphagia, acquired speech and language disorders, and voice disorders, and she has provided continuing education offerings in voice and swallowing.

Daphne Phillips, PhD<br /><em>Primary Progressive Aphasia: What are We Doing?</em> - Friday, March 31 from 11:00 am-12:30 pm.

Dr. Phillips has been a Speech Pathologist for 28 years. During that time, she has worked in hospital, acute care, rehab, day program and outpatient settings. Her areas of special interest include adult neurogenic disorders, cognitive-linguistic impairments associated with mild head injury/concussion, and student supervision. She currently works at Mayo Clinic Arizona in outpatient where she sees adults with various cognitive-communication disorders and is co-coordinator of the PPA Support Group. Dr. Phillips is a certified brain injury specialist and is also certified in LSVT LOUD and Speak OUT.

Katherine Shore CCC-SLP<br /><em>Primary Progressive Aphasia: What are We Doing?</em> - Friday, March 31 from 11:00 am-12:30 pm.

Katie Shore is a Speech-Language Pathologist and Certified Brain Injury Specialist. She has been specializing in adult neurological rehabilitation for 3 years. Her areas of interest include high-level cognitive disorders associated with brain injury, language disorders following a stroke, and neurodegenerative diseases and their associated syndromes including Primary Progressive Aphasia. In collaboration with Dr. Phillips, she assisted with the development of the PPA support group at Mayo Clinic that meets once a month.

Erin Rotheram-Fuller, PhD<br /><em>Building Interdisciplinary Programs Around Autism</em> - Saturday, April 1, 8:00 am – 9:30 am.

Erin Rotheram-Fuller specializes in research on autism and other high risk populations. She studies the school and family environment support systems around children with social challenges. Professor Rotheram-Fuller is a board certified behavior analyst as well as a licensed psychologist and provides consultation to schools and agencies on how to best support children who are struggling within the classroom or home. She trains general education teachers on what to expect in the classroom from a child on the autism spectrum and provides coaching on best practices in inclusion and social supports.

Maria V. Dixon, CCC-SLP<br /><em>Building Interdisciplinary Programs Around Autism</em> - Saturday, April 1, 8:00 am – 9:30 am.

Maria V. Dixon is a Clinical Professor at Arizona State University. Previously, she has been on clinical at Purdue University and the University of Maryland at College Park. Maria has worked with children and young adults with autism spectrum disorders and their families. Her areas of specialty are child speech and language development and disorder, autism, bilingual speech-language pathology, interprofessional education and practice and multicultural aspects of speech-language pathology service delivery.

Alicia Goodman, PhD<br /><em>Selective Mutism: What SLPs Need to Know Part l & ll</em> - Saturday, April 1 from 2:00 pm-3:30 pm and 3:345 pm-5:15 pm.

Dr. Alicia Goodman is a licensed psychologist and nationally certified school psychologist. She is the owner and director of Simply Psychology LLC in Phoenix Arizona, a multidisciplinary group practice specializing in childhood anxiety disorders, including selective mutism and providing individual therapy, comprehensive evaluations and workshops for parents and school professionals.

Melissa White, MS, CCC-SLP<br /><em>Selective Mutism: What SLPs Need to Know Part l & ll</em> - Saturday, April 1 from 2:00 pm-3:30 pm and 3:345 pm-5:15 pm.

Melissa White is a speech-language pathologist in Phoenix, AZ. She works in a public elementary school, and also has experience working in home and clinical settings, including working with children with selective mutism at Simply Psychology. She is especially interested in language assessment, reading, and school-based issues.

Janet Hawley, ClinScD, CCC-SLP<br /><em> The SLP: Serving Individuals Across the Gender Spectrum,</em> - Friday, March 31 from 4:00 pm-5:30 pm.

Janet L. Hawley is an Associate Professor at the University of Arizona. Dr. Hawley is a passionate cisgender ally for the LGBTQI+ community. She provides gender-affirming clinical services across the age spectrum. She also supports the LGBTQI+ community through her research, teaching, and outreach to students, health care professionals, general public, and the LGBTQI+ community.

Mo Mortazavi, MD<br /><em>Evidence Based Management of mTBI and Complex Concussions</em> - March 31 from 9:15 am-10:15 am.

Dr. Mohammed Mortazavi, MD is a Sports Medicine Specialist in Tucson, AZ and has over 15 years of experience in the medical field. He graduated from University of California in 2008.

Gina Santos, CCC-SLP<br /><em>Supporting Mixed Status Families In Education Settings</em> - Friday, March 31 from 11:00 am-12:30 pm.

Gina Santos, bilingual speech language pathologist, has worked in Southern Arizona for over 20 years. She has worked in inpatient and outpatient rehab settings in Tucson and Nogales as a speech language clinician and as a rehab supervisor. Currently, Gina works as a school based speech pathologist with Tucson Unified School district serving elementary and middle school students. Gina received her Bachelors of Sciences in Speech & Hearing Sciences from the University of Arizona. She attended the University of Iowa, earning her Masters of Art in Speech Pathology and later returned to University of Arizona for second masters in Educational leadership. Gina is a Tucson native, wife, and mom of 3 busy children.

Lindsay Shroyer, AuD<br /><em>Cochlear Implantation: Criteria, Considerations and Clinical Relevance</em> - Saturday, April1 from 3:45 pm-5:15 pm.

Dr. Shroyer earned her doctorate in audiology in 2012 from the University of Louisville. She has been working with Arizona Hearing and Balance Center since 2011 and continues to provide clinical care at that setting. She participates in clinical work ranging from diagnostics to implantation.

Shawn Stevens, MD<br /><em>Expanded FDA Criteria for Cochlear Implantation in Peds and Adults</em> - Saturday, April 1 from 10:00 am-11:30 am.

Dr. Shawn Stevens is a Neurotology Specialist in Phoenix, AZ and has over 7 years of experience in the medical field. Dr. Stevens has extensive experience in Otologic Conditions & Procedures. He graduated from the University of Cincinnati/Medical Center in 2016. He is affiliated with St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center.

Elizabeth Walker, PhD, CCC-A/SLP<br /><em>Incorporating OTC Hearing Aids into Clinical Practices</em> - Saturday, April 1 from 2:00 pm-3:30 pm.<br /><em>Ethics for Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists: ASHA Procedures and Resources</em> - Saturday, April 1 from 12:45 pm-1:45 pm.

Dr. Walker is an associate professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Iowa and the Director of the Pediatric Audiology and Language Laboratory. Dr. Walker's NIH-funded research focuses on pediatric audiology, specifically examining malleable factors that support listening and language outcomes for children who are deaf or hard of hearing. She has published over 50 peer-reviewed articles in the area of pediatric audiology and aural habilitation, and has co-written a textbook on pediatric amplification. She is currently serving as the Audiology At-Large member on the ASHA Board of Directors.

Carla Zimmerman, CCC-SLP<br /.><em>Aural Rehabilitation for Children and Adults with Cochlear Implants</em> - Saturday, April 1 from 8:00 am-9:30 am.

Carla Zimmerman is a speech-language pathologist and LSLS certified auditory verbal therapist, and the owner of Zimmerman Speech & Hearing in Tempe, Arizona. Her years of experience with children and adults who are deaf and hard-of-hearing have given her thousands of hours of discerning what is working and what isn't; her passion is to unravel the puzzle of what ISN'T working and then to collaborate with the family to turn things around.

Friday, March 31, 1:00 pm- 2:00 pm

K-8 Speech-Language Pathologists' Training and Implementation of Research-Based Behavioral Intervention Strategies

Ruth Scherschligt, EdD, University of South Dakota
Kyle Brouwer, PhD, University of South Dakota
Susan Gapp, EdD, University of South Dakota
Monica Iverson, EdD, University of South Dakota
Marcy Drew, EdD, South Dakota Public Broadcasting

The purpose of this study was to examine school-based speech-language pathologists' (SLPs') training and implementation of research-based behavioral intervention strategies. The study also sought to determine if there were statistically significant differences in the level of SLP training and implementation based on size of school district and years of experience in the field.

Nonexperimental, quantitative, survey research methods were used to gather the data. A researcher-developed survey with 21 response items inquiring about training and implementation of research-based behavioral intervention strategies was distributed to current members of the American Speech-Language & Hearing Association (ASHA). Information on size of district and years of experience in the field was also gathered in the survey. Additional questions were asked to supplement and clarify the quantitative data Seventy-eight qualified respondents completed the survey. Multiple independent sample 2-tailed t-tests were completed for analysis.

Results indicated that SLPs in the study had some training in research-based behavioral intervention strategies and that these strategies were implemented sometimes during speech therapy sessions. Further, results indicated that there was no statistically significant difference in SLP level of training or implementation based on years of experience or size of school district. Additional information gathering from the survey provided further insight on the types of behaviors that SLPs encountered during speech therapy sessions and how those behaviors negatively impacted their ability to provide services as well as their overall job satisfaction.

Although the results indicated that K-8 SLPs have some training and sometimes implement research-based behavioral intervention strategies, a majority of SLPs in the study felt that they were not adequately trained to handle student behavioral issues, regardless of their years of experience or the size of the district in which they worked. To better prepare SLPs to work with students who exhibit behavioral issues, particularly since there has been a  significant rise of comorbidity in elementary-age children who have a diagnosed Developmental Language Disorder (DLD) and emotional disorders (ED),  more training in research-based behavioral intervention strategies in preparation programs and professional development plans should be considered.

At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:

    • Describe to what extent are K-8 speech-language pathologists are trained in research-based behavioral intervention strategies and implementing research-based behavioral intervention strategies into students’ speech-language pathology sessions.
    • Articulate differences in K-8 SLPs’ training and implementation of research-based behavioral intervention strategies based on years of experience in the field and size of the school district where they are employed.
    • Learn more about qualitative data collected from K-8 SLPs regarding student behaviors they have experienced and the impact it has had on their job satisfaction.

The Effects of Virtual Reality With a TBI Patient

Erin McGranahan, BA, Midwestern University Graduate Student
Halle Turek, BS, Midwestern University Graduate Student
Eileen Tokarz, CCC-SLP, Midwestern University Clinical Associate Professor

Background:  Virtual Reality therapy will be implemented in an intervention as a single case study to analyze the comparison of virtual reality therapy (CAREN)  to traditional speech therapy with an individual with a TBI. This research projects the increase of overall quality of life of those with TBI and aims for a new intervention approach that individuals can respond to positively. This project will serve as the first CAREN speech-pathology research at Midwestern University that has used this intervention approach. 

Method: A Pre and Post survey was created for the client to assess her thoughts and feelings about participating in virtual reality therapy. During virtual reality therapy, the client participated in the Stroop Test and simulated experiences. Traditional therapy included a modified LSVT method and Slow, Loudness, Over articulate, and Pause method (SLOP). During the Stroop Test, her speed and accuracy were tracked at each speed level. Throughout both traditional and virtual reality therapy, her decibels were recorded in three spontaneous conversation trials.

Conclusion:  The individual showed an overall increase in the pre and post survey on a 5 point Likert scale and in qualitative and quantitative data.  After analyzing both data from traditional therapy to virtual reality, the client showed an increase in decibels and processing speed. The client reported her increase in communication with non-familiar listeners and her confidence. The project will be continuing for further research by implementing an eye tracking device to measure her progression of her processing speed.

At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:

    • Identify 3-4 items of Virtual Reality therapy increases client’s QoL through simulated real-life experiences.
    • Identify 3 to 4 data points showing dB levels for Virtual Reality was as effective to increasing dB as Traditional therapy.
    • Identify 3-4 data points that Virtual Reality exhibited an increase in client's speed in visual processing.

Implementing Montessori Program in Long-Term-Care Setting: Barriers, Challenges and Success

Malathy Venkatesh, PhD, Reunion Rehabilitation Hospital; Tempe Post-Acute
Tanya Estrada, COTA/L, TPM, Tempe Post-Acute

Despite documented evidence indicating the benefits of person-centered approaches in improving and maintaining the quality of life in residents with dementia, the practical application of this knowledge in daily life in LTC facilities is minimal. Many facilities and caregivers are still unprepared and untrained in managing residents with dementia. This paper discusses the barriers, challenges and successful implementation of a Montessori based project titled “Meaningful roles and activities for individuals with dementia” at a post-acute center in AZ. The implementation of this project was possible through a CMP fund granted to the post-acute center.  Successful outcomes of this project included staff training on highly skilled dementia programs and, establishing an “Engagement room” to encourage resident participation, maximize independence and facilitate resident engagement in meaningful activities depending on their abilities and needs. This paper also discusses the functional outcomes in four areas including Orientation, Social interaction, Cognition, and Motor skills during various stages of implementation of the program utilizing the scores obtained on a questionnaire developed specifically for this project. Although not all barriers and challenges could be overcome, this   project facilitated caregiver education and has created awareness on the importance of the need for person-centered approaches to the management of individuals with dementia in a LTC setting.

At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:

    • Describe person-center approaches to the management of residents with dementia in a LTC setting
    • Recognize the barriers and challenges in the management of residents with dementia in an institutionalized setting
    • Integrate the information provided to develop a framework they can implement at a LTC setting to address resident needs


College Readiness After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (CRAMTBI)

Evelyn Cross, BA, Northern Arizona University
Courtney Syverson, BS, Nothern Arizona University
Monica Lininger, PhD, Advisor, Northern Arizona University
Emi Isaki, PhD, Advisor, Northern Arizona University

Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI)/concussion is a worldwide public health concern affecting young adults who often return to work or college following injury. For those returning to academic studies, students with mTBI/concussion, and early or persistent symptoms that affect cognitive-communication generally struggle in their coursework. The cognitive-communication skills necessary for college are unique, and the need to identify these skills is essential for student success. A questionnaire that identifies cognitive-communication skills relevant to online and in-person coursework for students could provide much needed information for referrals to specific healthcare services and academic supports. Therefore, a 27-item questionnaire was developed, the College Readiness After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (CRAMTBI), and piloted with 7 undergraduate and 5 graduate students. The results from this pilot study were used to optimize the questionnaire prior to collection of normative data on a larger sample size. Improved understanding of cognitive-communication challenges for college students will allow for early referrals and intervention to return to the classroom.

At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:

    • Explain widespread occurrence of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI)/concussion among young adults.
    • Identify symptoms and persistent deficits associated with mTBI/concussion.
    • Describe the cognitive-communication processes necessary for academic performance in college.


Effects of SFA and Verbs, Compared to VNeST, on PWA

Alexie MacKay, BS, Midwestern University
Brittany Eberson, BS, Midwestern University
Stephanie Christensen, PhD, Midwestern University

This project intends to demonstrate that SFA can be used to provide an effective action word retrieval strategy when creating a sentence in PWA, over VNeST. Using SFA is expected to benefit the patient by increasing comprehension and vocabulary skills, whereas VNeST only targets improving the ability to create sentences. This study intends to measure outcomes based on pre-and post-testing when assessing the rate and accuracy of creating a sentence with an action word using SFA and VNeST. The expected outcome is to see improvements in the rate and accuracy of the targeted action word using SFA versus VNeST therapy intervention in PWA. A single-subject, multiple baseline across behaviors and alternating treatment design was used. The participant is a 73-year-old Caucasian male, who is 4 years, 4 months, post-onset of an ischemic cerebrovascular accident. Treatment was given twice a week for 60-minute sessions, alternating between SFA and VNeST, randomizing the probe words each week. Both SFA and VNeST therapy interventions were effective in this study. However, these results indicate that the SFA therapy intervention promotes a slightly more accurate sentence production (complete, appropriate patient & correct use of the verb), as well as producing the sentences in a timely manner. Due to closely related rates and accuracy, more research is warranted to explore the SFA and VNeST treatment interventions when creating a sentence with an action word for PWA.

At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:

    • Describe why the VNeST is 24 milliseconds slower than SFA
    • Describe why the SFA is .05 more accurate when creating a complete sentence
    • Describe why the SFA is .12 more accurate when choosing a specific patient appropriate to the verb
    • Describe why the SFA is .02 more accurate when using the correct use of the verb

Cultural Factors That Influence Pediatric Feeding and Swallowing Services

Cynthia Fangman Farrell, CCC-SLP, Northern Arizona University
Natalie Arnold, BS, Northern Arizona University
Talia Brierly, BA, Northern Arizona University
Rebecca Gerety, BS, Northern Arizona Unversity

The purpose of this poster is to increase awareness of the need for SLPs to provide culturally competent evaluation, diagnostic, and intervention for children with Pediatric Feeding Disorders (PFD).  ASHA emphasizes the importance of cultural competence in addressing dysphagia with broadening our definition of cultural diversity beyond language and ethnic foods to include religion, lifestyle, views of disability or Western medicine, and family member roles (Riquelme, 2004).  Cultural factors can impact when children achieve developmental milestones with eating and drinking skills.  Therefore, cultural factors need to be taken into consideration when examining “abnormal” feeding and swallowing skills within the client’s cultural context (difference vs. disorder) (Constantinia et al, 2019).  In addition to cultural differences, children with low socioeconomic status may not have access to health care, adaptive equipment, food, and/or insurance coverage necessary to meet the family’s needs (McCarty & Hasselkus, 2009).  This poster will include culturally sensitive diagnostic and treatment strategies and methods to ensure cultural competence and socioeconomic equality in serving children with PFD across practice settings. 

At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:

    • List the cultural and socioeconomic factors that may influence practice in feeding and swallowing disorders.
    • List some ways that SLPs can be proactive in addressing these factors in dysphagia service provision.
    • Identify three specific methods or procedures that an SLP can implement to ensure culturally competent service provision in this practice area.

A Pediatric Feeding Disorder (PFD) Interprofessional Assessment Protocol

Cynthia Fangman Farrell, CCC-SLP, Northern Arizona University
Natalie Arnold, BS, Northern Arizona University
Talia Brierly, BA, Northern Arizona University
Rebecca Gerety, BS, Northern Arizona University

Pediatric Feeding Disorder (PFD) is impaired oral intake that is not age-appropriate and is associated with at least one of four closely related domains which include medical, nutritional, feeding skill, and/or psychosocial dysfunction (Goday et al, 2019).  This newly CDC approved PFD is a “stand-alone” diagnostic code in the new 2021 ICD-11.  The definition has been accepted by all professionals establishing a common terminology that has impacted clinical practice, education, research, and advocacy in both healthcare and education settings.  This diagnostic framework ensures that children with PFD have access to all specialist and interprofessional team members needed to address their eating and drinking difficulties (Homer, 2014).  Current assessment tools may not address all of these diagnostic areas and/or rely on parent report to gain diagnostic information (Heckathorn et al, 2015).   This poster will present an assessment tool that addresses all four components of this newly accepted PFD definition. 

At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:

    • List the four domains included in the newly CDC approved definition of a Pediatric Feeding Disorder (PFD).
    • Describe the benefits of using a common framework and terminology for PFD diagnosis across practice settings.
    • Identify important team members involved in the using the four components in making diagnostic decisions in this practice area.

School-Based SLP Experiences During COVID

Sandra Stewart, EdD, Northern Arizona University and ArSHA Schools Committee
Darrell Dern, CCC-SLP, ArSHA Schools Committee
Michelle Thomas, CCC-SLP, Northern Arizona University and ArSHA Schools Committee

This poster presents results from a study using focus group methods to explore Arizona school-based SLP attitudes toward speech-language therapy and gain greater understanding of: (1) current attitudes toward telepractice and its role in future speech-language services; (2) the facet of service provision that currently concerns SLPs most and what associated change/s they would like to see; (3) whether they have recently struggled with a decision to leave the profession and issues related to the struggle; (4) pivotal supports that have existed for SLPs during this period; and (5) whether, and in what way their feelings about service provision have changed since the start of the pandemic.

NOTE: This focus group took place on October 29th and results are still being coded.

At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:

    • Identify and discuss current attitudes toward telepractice in the school setting.
    • Describe current attitudes toward the future use of telepractice in the schools and list 3 aspects of telepractice those interviewed would like to see continue.
    • List at least 3  SLP service delivery challenges and/or successes using telepractice, and in general, throughout the pandemic.

Exploring Bone Conduction Practices for Various Head Coverings: A Survey

Duc Phan, BS, A.T. Still University
Perri Fine, MS, A.T. Still University
Patricia Stanley, BS, A.T. Still University
Diana Roman, BS, A.T. Still University - Arizona School of Health Sciences
Kimberly Skinner, AuD, PhD, A.T. Still University
Elizabeth Palmer, AuD, CCC-A, A.T. Still University - Arizona School of Health Sciences
Tania Vega, BS, A.T. Still University

Bone conduction testing is a foundational component of a comprehensive audiologic evaluation. However, no formal protocol has been developed for head coverings (e.g., wig, cap, turban, hijab, or headscarf) and bone conduction testing. Anecdotally, there appears to be variety amongst hearing care professionals as to which head coverings are routinely removed for bone conduction testing. The purpose of this study was to investigate current bone conduction testing practices among licensed hearing care providers in the United States. A survey was developed to probe questions of bone conduction testing protocols and whether modifications were made for various forms of head coverings. The survey consisted of both Likert-type questions asking the frequency with which the respondent encounters patients with various types of head coverings, and also asked participants to rate the frequency with which they ask patients to remove each head covering type prior to bone conduction testing. The survey also consisted of open-ended questions, asking respondents to elaborate on why they would or would not have a patient remove a particular head covering for bone conduction testing.

With the population of the United States becoming more diverse, and the religious significance of many head coverings a hearing care provider may encounter professionally, we also wanted to examine hearing care professionals’ perceptions regarding religious discrimination. We asked the extent to which participants agreed that religious discrimination is a problem in US healthcare.

A total of 233 responses from hearing professionals with verifiable state licenses were received. These results are presented here.

At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the frequency of unoccluded bone conduction testing in a sample of hearing care professionals.
    • Identify the types of head coverings commonly removed for bone conduction testing.
    • Identify the perception of religious discrimination in a sample of hearing care professionals.

Language of Love: Factors that Strengthen Relationships After Aphasia

Heather Riddle, BS, Midwestern University
Stephanie Christensen, CCC-SLP PhD, Midwestern University
Colin Macpherson, CCC-SLP MA, Midwestern University

Previous research has revealed negative effects of aphasia on relationships, including friendships (Ford, et al., 2017) and partnerships (Stead, 2021). However, characteristics of relationships that aid in the relationships lasting despite the development of aphasia in one partner have not been readily investigated. For couples to navigate the difficult and complicated changes that aphasia creates, it’s essential to create a foundation of knowledge about the positive traits present in a relationship and how these traits affect intimacy and communication. The purpose of the current work was to determine characteristics present in relationships of couples that lasted through the changes of aphasia. Researchers interviewed three people with aphasia and their partners who self-identified as successfully having navigated the challenges of aphasia. All interviews were audio recorded and transcribed. Participants also completed the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS), a measure of relationship satisfaction. A phenomenological analysis revealed two major themes for characteristics present in the relationship of participants: self-pruning of characteristics and humor. Self-pruning was the most prominent theme with this behavior being described during discussions of changes partners made to aid each other. Humor was the second theme with participants stating that humor had always been an important factor in their relationship and helped them with remaining connected after aphasia. These results indicate that a willingness to change for the partner and maintaining a sense of humor can aid a relationship through the changes brought on by aphasia.

At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:

    • State two factors important for maintaining strong partner relationships after aphasia.
    • Discuss how three partners utilized humor and self-pruning to navigate the changes of aphasia.
    • State one factor about the benefit of discussing relationship factors with patient's.

Acquisition of dysphagia-specific knowledge for individuals with Parkinson disease: A pilot brochure

Rosa Stewart, BA, Northern Arizona University
Heidi Wayment, PhD, Northern Arizona University
Rebecca Bartlett, PhD, Northern Arizona University

Introduction: Despite the systemic impact of Parkinson disease (PD), only 55% of affected individuals feel that they have the disease-specific knowledge that they need (Riggare et al., 2017). Currently available patient resources about dysphagia related to PD have shortcomings, such as being text-heavy or missing areas of interest. The purpose of this project was to use interview data to create a useful and targeted swallowing resource for individuals with PD.

Methods: Oral surveys were conducted with a national sample of individuals with PD (n = 25) in order to describe the experience of coping with the physiological and psychosocial consequences of dysphagia. The present project focused on a subset of the responses from participants about their knowledge of dysphagia, specific questions about dysphagia, and preference of modality to receive information.

Results/Discussion: Sixty percent (15/25=60%) of the sample reported that they do not have a good understanding of dysphagia, and 92% of participants wanted to know more. A pamphlet was the most popular education modality selected by participants. Among the questions posed by participants, seven themes were identified, with dysphagia treatment options being the most frequent. The authors developed a pilot pamphlet to address the most common questions. The pamphlet will be summarized on the poster and presented to a subset of the participants through a member check in the future.

Conclusion: By having access to knowledge about dysphagia, individuals may be better equipped to understand and cope with their condition, advocate for their care, and make informed health care decisions.

At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:

    • Name three common questions posed by individuals with dysphagia secondary to PD.
    • Identify the two modalities most preferred by individuals with PD for receiving information about dysphagia.
    • Brainstorm how the pamphlet could be distributed, once the member check is complete.

Implementing the Regularity Principle: Implications for Self-Supervision

Madison Decker, BA, Midwestern University
Adalia Mullakandov, BS, Midwestern University
Colin Macpherson M.A., CCC-SLP, Midwestern University

Plante and Gomez (2018) described the critical importance of implicit learning in the language acquisition process. These authors described the regularity principle as crucial for implicit learning. The regularity principle consists of two components: frequency of occurrence and consistency. Frequency of occurrence consists of providing as many linguistic targets as possible in a specified time frame. Each utterance that contains a linguistic target could be considered a treatment dose (Alt et al., 2020). Consistency refers to making the linguistic target the most frequently occurring linguistic structure in a specified time frame. Implementation of the consistency component assumes that a large majority of the utterances spoken by the student speech-language pathologist would be considered treatment doses.

We examined the implementation of regularity principle in focused stimulation intervention for early word learning. Specifically, we examined the number of treatment doses provided (i.e., frequency of occurrence) as well as the proportion of dose utterances to utterances not containing the linguistic target (consistency) during five focused stimulation treatment sessions. The participant was a two-year-old female with severely restricted word comprehension and production skills. Treatment dose, dose number, total number of doses, and dose form (Alt et al., 2020) were specified and examined during treatment.

The results of our study indicated that the student speech language pathologist improved their ability to implement both aspects of the regularity principle over time. Our findings suggest possible methods that speech language pathologists can use to determine whether they are implementing the regularity principle in focused stimulation intervention.

At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the importance of the Regularity Principle in language acquisition
    • Describe the two major components of the Regularity Principle.
    • Determine the use of frequency of occurrence and consistency computations for self supervision

Effects of Late Preterm Birth on Communication and Feeding

Abigail Harris, The University of Arizona
Jennifer Casteix, CCC-SLP, The University of Arizona

Every year in the United States, approximately 267,000 infants are born late preterm, meaning between 34 0/7 weeks to 36 6/7 weeks gestation (March of Dimes Peristats). This number accounts for 70% of all preterm births, and early birth places these infants at risk for health and developmental risks, including communication and feeding delays (Stewart et al, 2019). However, not much is readily known on developmental outcomes of this cohort of infants. In addition, not all US based graduate programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) may be preparing future SLPs to practice in this area of our field (Farrugia, 2022). This presentation reviews available developmental information on late preterm infants from birth to 24 months of age, with a focus on communication and feeding development. This information may inform CSD training programs on future directions.

At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:

    • Identify one developmental feeding risk in a 12 month old infant and in a 24 month old infant born late preterm.
    • Describe two developmental communication risks in a 12 month old infant and a 24 month old infant born late preterm.
    • Name two risk factors affecting women that can lead to late preterm delivery of their infants.

Speaker Disclosures (PDF)


The supervision courses (Sessions 12 and 33) are offered separately for up to 0.3 ASHA CEUs (intermediate level)

The ethics course (Session 34) is offered separately for 0.1 ASHA CEUs (intermediate level)

The DEI courses (Sessions 5, 6, 8, 15, 16, 20, 22, 27) are offered separately for up to 1.05 ASHA CEUs (intermediate level)


The following sessions are eligible for American Academy of Audiology CEUs:

S12
S21
S25
S34 (Ethics)
S28
S31


Sessions

Sessions

Friday, March 31, 2023

8:00 am - 9:00 am
Multi-Interest | S01

Positively Better Together
Manny Valenzuela

This session is not available for CE credit.


9:15 am - 10:45 am
Pediatric SLP | S02
Level of Learning: Intermediate

The SLPs Role in Breast/Body Feeding and Bottle Feeding Assessment
Maggie Sudimack, CCC-SLP, Lactation & Language, A.T. Still University Director of Clinical Education/Instructor.

Many therapists feel unprepared to assess proper latch when breast/body and bottle feeding even though our scope of practice covers pediatric dysphagia. A parent may come to SLPs in various settings for help regarding infant feeding. Parents often feel unsupported when they receive varying advice from professionals (Dykes & Williams, 1999), so it becomes essential for an SLP to be properly educated when developing a treatment plan for parents seeking help when breast or bottle feeding their infant. Some of the most common causes of infant feeding difficulties are nipple pain, adequate milk transfer, infant weight gain, gassiness, fussiness, infant fatigue, and overall infant discomfort. When breast feeding, these are common reasons that parents may switch to bottle feeding expressed breast milk (EBM) or using formula (Odom, et al., 2013). When assessing a latch, either on breast or bottle, there are key attributes to look for: lip flanging, curved cheek line, angle of mouth gape, nasal space, approach of infant’s mouth, and rocker jaw movement (Cadwell & Turner-Maffei, 2022). Assessing a latch is essential when addressing parental concerns because an infant’s latch can have a direct relationship to maternal/parental nipple comfort, milk supply, milk transfer, infant weight gain, and infant discomfort. In order to promote a proper latch, an SLP is able to suggest various techniques, such as adjusting position of infant, position of caregivers hands, bottle/nipple system, flow rate, adjusting feeding schedule, and educating parents how to read the infant’s cues when feeding (Mahurin-Smith & Genna, 2018; Shaker, 2018).

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • analyze latch on bottle or breast to determine what may be causing parental concern.
      • identify and analyze three possible causes of parental concern regarding latch on bottle or breast.
      • develop and implement a minimum of four intervention strategies with the family to improve breast and/or bottle feeding.

9:15 am - 10:45 am
Pediatric SLP | S03
Level of Learning: Introductory

Gimme a Break! Using Brain Breaks as an EBP
Mary Keeney, CCC-SLP, Arizona Department of Education
Mitch Galbraith, OTD, OTR/L, Arizona Department of Education
Margaret Egan, PT

Many of the students on our caseloads have difficulties attending, processing, and recalling information. Movement and brain breaks have great potential to help students learn and remember. Brain breaks can be based on movement, low-load cognitive tasks, or breathwork. All types of brain breaks have positive effects on executive function, attention and recall, math and reading, and may also reduce stress. In this session you will be given a collection of brain breaks curated by an occupational therapist, a physical therapist, and a speech-language pathologist. We will also share no- and low- prep strategies to quickly and easily choose and use brain breaks in any pediatric setting.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • inform others of the benefits of integrating brain breaks in the classroom, therapy room, and zoom room.
      • explain the three Bs framework of brain breaks and the corresponding research demonstrating positive impacts on student learning
      • use resources provided to choose and use brain breaks efficiently and effectively

9:15 am - 10:45 am
Multi-Interest | S04
Level of Learning: Intermediate

Pediatric TBI/Sports Concussions
Mo Mortazavi, MD, SPARCC Sports Medicine, Rehabilitation & Concussion Center

Mental fog fatigue, migraine, mood, vision & balance problems, dysautonomia, neck pain, and learning problems are all symptoms that may occur as a result of mTBI and complex concussions. This session will provide an overview of what is considered a simple versus a complex concussion, as well as how to subtype concussions. Concussion symptoms will be identified and case studies will be presented to solidify a deeper understanding of mTBI and concussions. Rehab protocol will be presented, including position statements. Academic impact and return to learn will be discussed, including school accommodations and guidelines for educators. Vestibular dysfunction and assessment will be included. Attendees will leave this session with an understanding of individualized and targeted treatments for management of complex concussions.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • Define Complex Concussions
      • Identify Concussion Profiles and Define Subtypes
      • Explain the Comprehensive Care Model for Concussion Management
      • Utilize Case Reviews and Consensus Summaries to Determine Plan of Care

9:15 am - 10:45 am
Pediatric SLP | S05
Level of Learning: Intermediate

The Detrimental Outcomes of Social Skills Training and an Alternative Neurodiversity-Affirming Conceptual Practice Framework for Social Communication, Part 1
Julie Roberts, MS, CCC-SLP, Therapist Neurodiversity Collective, Inc

Social Skills Training for autistic young people has been a standard autism intervention for decades. From a behavioral lens, speech-language pathologists define what appropriate social skills should “look like” based on arbitrary and often subjective standards of “typical”. Social Skills assessment, analysis, and treatment of autistic social communication target outcomes of “normalization" through explicit instructions, modeling, behavior rehearsal, feedback, and reinforcement. Presented by a formally late-identified Autistic SLP, this 3-hour seminar will provide an overview of The Neurodiversity-Affirming Conceptual Practice Framework of Social Communication (© 2019 - 2023 Julie Roberts), which is an evidence-based alternative intervention model to autistic social skills training, grounded in contemporary autism research. Topics include autistic social communication research, autistic cultural competence, clinical priorities, assessment, goals, and consideration for outcomes.

Time-Ordered Agenda

9:15- 9:25           Intro
9:25 – 9:55         Neurodiversity 101, Models of Disability
9:55 – 10:15        Autistic Trauma
10:15 -10:25        Dehumanizing Myths: Empathy and TOM
10:25 – 10:35      Autistic Stigma
10:35 – 10:45      Acceptance

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • participants will be able to identify primary differences between non-autistic (allistic) and autistic social communication and list 3 primary supporting contemporary research theories.
      • participants will be able to identify social skills goals that may impact trauma, and have harmful outcomes, and explain why based on supporting contemporary research evidence.
      • participants will be able to describe key considerations when assessing and planning for ethical, evidence-based, trauma-informed and neurodiversity-affirming intervention with autistic social communicators.

11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Pediatric SLP | S06
Level of Learning: Intermediate

The Detrimental Outcomes of Social Skills Training and an Alternative Neurodiversity-Affirming Conceptual Practice Framework for Social Communication, Part 2
Julie Roberts, MS, CCC-SLP, Therapist Neurodiversity Collective, Inc

Social Skills Training for autistic young people has been a standard autism intervention for decades. From a behavioral lens, speech-language pathologists define what appropriate social skills should “look like” based on arbitrary and often subjective standards of “typical”. Social Skills assessment, analysis, and treatment of autistic social communication target outcomes of “normalization" through explicit instructions, modeling, behavior rehearsal, feedback, and reinforcement. Presented by a formally late-identified Autistic SLP, this 3-hour seminar will provide an overview of The Neurodiversity-Affirming Conceptual Practice Framework of Social Communication (© 2019 - 2023 Julie Roberts), which is an evidence-based alternative intervention model to autistic social skills training, grounded in contemporary autism research. Topics include autistic social communication research, autistic cultural competence, clinical priorities, assessment, goals, and consideration for outcomes.

Time-Ordered Agenda

11:00 – 11:45:  Contemporary Research Overview

Monotropism
The Double Empathy Problem
Diversity in Social Intelligence
Autistic Masking Camouflaging, Adaptive Morphing

11:45-12:30: Assessment and Goal Writing: The Neurodiversity-Affirming Theoretical Framework of Social Communication

Components of Framework
Respectful Assessments
Social Skills Goals Makeovers

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • participants will be able to identify primary differences between non-autistic (allistic) and autistic social communication and list 3 primary supporting contemporary research theories.
      • participants will be able to identify social skills goals that may impact trauma, and have harmful outcomes, and explain why based on supporting contemporary research evidence.
      • participants will be able to describe key considerations when assessing and planning for ethical, evidence-based, trauma-informed and neurodiversity-affirming intervention with autistic social communicators.

11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Adult SLP | S07
Level of Learning: Intermediate

Primary Progressive Aphasia and Speech Pathology: What are We doing?
Daphne Phillips, PhD
Katherine (Katie) Shore, CCC-SLP

Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) is a syndrome that was first described in the literature over 100 years ago. A resurgence of publications on the topic began in 1982 with Mesulam as a prominent researcher in this area. PPA is a syndrome that is characterized by progressive loss of language in light of relatively stable cognitive abilities for at least the first 2 years. Individuals that have presented to care providers with these complaints typically undergo evaluations that may include brain imaging and neuropsychological testing. Many providers will also refer patients to Speech-Language Pathology for evaluation and treatment. There was minimal research found in the literature as to any evaluation or treatment protocols or dosage in speech pathology. This presentation will define PPA, provide an overview of the subtypes types of PPA, discuss options for evaluation and treatment and propose a prescriptive approach to managing this syndrome. In addition, the importance of the role of the SLP in diagnosis, treatment and support of the patients and their caregivers will be discussed.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • define PPA and its clinical subtypes.
      • discuss current research in the area of PPA and how it relates to the clinical practice of SLP.
      • improve clinical knowledge and decision making with patients with PPA and their caregivers.

11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Multi-Interest | S08
Level of Learning: Introductory

Supporting Mixed Status Families In Educational Settings
Gina Santos, CCC-SLP, Tucson Unified School District

Undocumented immigrants and their families are faced with deportation and detention without reasonable access to a path of citizenship or permanent residency. These actions result in family separation affecting children. Educational institutions, one of the primary settings engaging with impacted students, are forced to respond to the needs of struggling families and children with mixed status backgrounds. Speech language pathologists are essential members of special education teams faced with providing services to mixed status families facing challenging situations. Current research dedicated to understanding unique dynamics of mixed status families within educational and special education settings is useful to speech language pathologists as they develop educational plans targeted at long term communication and learning outcomes. Research indicates mixed status families benefit from: development of social networks with formal structures, individualized support at the school site in contrast to wider district initiatives, asset based approaches to develop child/ student/ family rapport and inclusivity, and ongoing professional development for cultural competency.

Time-Ordered Agenda

11:00-11:25         Introduction, Defining terms relating to mixed status families, demographics of population within our educational systems
11:25-11:50-       Research Re: Mixed Status  Families in Educational Settings
11:50-12:20         Discussion of Asset based model w/ examples
12:20-12:30         QA

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • define at a minimum of four terms related to immigration status.
      • state three ways to support Mixed Status families in educational settings.
      • list three strategies to encourage school/ special education team to develop support systems for mixed status families.

11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Multi-Interest | S09
Level of Learning: Introductory

Jeremy and Brenda’s: 20 Exciting Activities for the AAC Implementation
Jeremy Legaspi, CCC-SLP, PRC-Saltillo
Brenda DelMonte, CCC-SLP, Private Practice

Whether your service delivery model is one-on-one , a special education classroom, or inclusion in general education, planning activities that engage ALL learners can be challenging. When we provide students with a language foundation that supports increased social interaction and connection we empower them to communicate about topics they choose. This session will provide you with a customizable "toolbox" according to the interests, ideas, and experiences of each learner. Our goal in this session is to provide a variety of engaging activities that align with the AAC learner’s interests and allows them to take lead. Demonstrations of activities will be provided.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • List five websites that provide resources and ideas around AAC implementation.
      • Name at least three adapted toys or activities to improve alternative access to AAC.
      • state five AAC implementation ideas for one-on-one , special education classroom and general education settings.

2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Pediatric SLP | S10
Level of Learning: Introductory

Childhood Trauma: The Invisible Participant in Speech-Language Therapy Sessions
Nicole Hoopes, CCC-SLP, Ridge Zeller Therapy

The term “trauma” is often used in schools and academic conversations with little consensus on what the term means. This lack of clarity negatively impacts the ability of professionals to support clients with trauma histories. Researchers have begun using a central definition to precisely define trauma. This presentation will discuss and define trauma in reference to the 3 E’s: The type of event it is, how the person experiences the incident, and the long-term effect of the incident (Perry & Winfrey, 2021).

To support clients with trauma histories, one most understand the prevalence of trauma and its impact on the brain. This presentation will orientate participates to facts such as it is estimated that 40% of students in classrooms have trauma histories, and childhood trauma has the ability to impact many areas of cognitive development including: language, memory, attention, and executive functioning (Craig, 2016). Trauma impacts children differently, but the ones who experienced trauma severe enough and young enough often need speech-language support. Trauma later in childhood can impact executive functioning skills needed to access curriculum and make progress in speech-language therapy. Students who have experienced trauma are already in speech-language therapy rooms.

Supported by research from multiple fields, this presentation will provide the tools one needs to become a trauma-informed speech-language pathologist. The therapist will learn how to create a trauma sensitive room, areas to focus on during evaluations, how to use trauma sensitive behavior management techniques and specific direct instruction models to increase learning.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • define trauma and traumatic events.
      • define "state dependent functioning" and it's impact on learning.
      • recall three impacts of trauma on the brain.
      • identify at least five trauma-sensitive techniques to use in clinics and schools.

4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Pediatric SLP | S11
Level of Learning: Introductory

Adolescents With Developmental Language Disorder: Complex Sentence Assessment and Intervention
Colin Macpherson, MA, CCC-SLP, Midwestern University
Taylor Torongo, BS, Midwestern University
Atur Oraha, BS, Midwestern University
Elana Nicolia, BS, Midwestern University
Hoi Ku Tong, BS, Midwestern University

Speech-language pathologists are increasingly called upon to support the education performance of adolescents with language based learning disabilities. The language impairments exhibited by adolescents are subtle but can interfere with their success in the regular education classroom (Balthazar & Scott 2015; Balthazar & Scott, 2017). Language intervention services appropriate for adolescents entails knowledge of complex syntax and its development, procedures for assessing the complex syntax, and specific intervention approaches and strategies that improve the use of complex syntax in a variety of discourse genres including narrative and exposition. Additionally, the oral language skills children diagnosed with dyslexia, a comorbid language disability, are not routinely assessed and may lead to less effective language intervention when oral language impairments are not addressed.

The purpose of this seminar will be to provide participants with an overview of complex syntax, assessment procedures for both oral and written language use, and the use of Complex Sentence Intervention (CSI; Balthazar & Scott, 2017) in both clinical and school settings. The use of norm-referenced (e.g., Test of Language and Literacy Skills; Nelson, Plante, Helm Estabrooks, and Holtz, 2015) and criterion referenced measures including c-unit, t-unit, and clausal density analyses (Nippold, 2022) will be discussed. Practical methods for developing personally relevant materials for CSI as well as actual implementation of CSI with adolescents will be presented through two case studies. Upon completion of the session, participants should be able to provide assessment and intervention services that address the needs of adolescents with language impairment.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • identify norm and criterion referenced language measures to use with adolescents with language impairment.
      • describe how to use the internet to identify and develop personally relevant materials for complex sentence intervention
      • describe the metalinguistic procedures used in complex sentence intervention

2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Multi-Interest | S12
Level of Learning: Introductory

Clinical Supervision: A Matter of Perspective
Joshua Breger, MS, CCC-SLP, Arizona State University
Elizabeth Trueba, MS, CCC-SLP, Arizona State University

Clinical supervision is a challenging and rewarding way for an experienced audiologist or speech-language pathologist to give back to the profession. It is a collaborative experience in which the supervisor and supervisee should put in equal efforts for the most successful outcome. This session will investigate the perspectives of both parties involved and provide effective strategies for improving the supervisory experience. This session will also explore ways to include accommodations or accessibility options for supervisees with neurological or physical differences as well as ways to welcome supervisees from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. In addition, updates on supervision requirements and responsibilities will be reviewed. Professionals should leave this session feeling refreshed and empowered to guide the next generation of leaders in audiology and speech-language pathology.

Time-Ordered Agenda

2:00 – 2:05           Introductions and Review of Learning Objectives
2:05 – 2:15           Requirements for Supervision: AuD, SLP and SLPA
2:15 – 2:25           Requirements for Certification: AuD, SLP and SLPA
2:25 – 2:45           Review of Student Perspectives on Supervision with Case Studies and Discussion
2:45 – 3:05           Review of Supervisor Perspectives on Supervision with Case Studies and Discussion
3:05 – 3:15           Special Considerations Related to Accommodations
3:15 – 3:25           Wrap-Up and Resources
3:25 – 3:30           Additional QA

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • recognize requirements for supervision of audiology, SLP and SLPA students, SLPAs and Clinical Fellows
      • list at least three ways to establish a successful clinical experience for both the supervisor and supervisee
      • generate possible solutions for common clinical supervision dilemmas

2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Multi-Interest | S13
Level of Learning: Intermediate

Remediation of 7 Common Error Sounds Using the SATPAC Approach, Part 1
Stephen Sacks, CCC-SLP, SATPAC Speech

Most of the speech sound disorders involve the S and R sounds and to a lesser extent the K,G,L,SH,CH,J, and TH sounds. The presentor will show how to effectively and efficiently remediate these speech sounds. Peer-reviewed studies involving the S and R sounds using the SATPAC Program and Approach have shown that these sounds can be remediated in 5 hours or less using RTI and weekly individual 15 minute sessions keeping most of these students out of Special Education.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • recall the two types of constriction necessary for successful /r/ production.
      • recall the exercise that has been successful in correct placement for the /s/ sound.
      • recall techniques for successful remediating the most common error sounds.

4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Multi-Interest | S14
Level of Learning: Intermediate

Remediation of 7 Common Error Sounds Using the SATPAC Approach, Part 2
Stephen Sacks, CCC-SLP

Most of the speech sound disorders involve the S and R sounds and to a lesser extent the K,G,L,SH,CH,J, and TH sounds. The presentor will show how to effectively and efficiently remediate these speech sounds. Peer-reviewed studies involving the S and R sounds using the SATPAC Program and Approach have shown that these sounds can be remediated in 5 hours or less using RTI and weekly individual 15 minute sessions keeping most of these students out of Special Education.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • recall the two types of constriction necessary for successful /r/ production.
      • recall the exercise that has been successful in correct placement for the /s/ sound.
      • recall techniques for successful remediating the most common error sounds.

4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Multi-Interest | S15
Level of Learning: Introductory

Cultural Competence and Treatment in Pediatric Gender Affirming Voice Therapy
Lisa Melady, MS, CCC-SLP, Phoenix Children's Hospital

The connection between voice and quality of life within the gender expansive population has been well documented. People that identify as LGBTQIA+ have frequently reported that their voices do not represent their gender, and they would feel safer and more confident with gender-affirming voice modification. Voice and communication therapy may help alleviate gender misidentification and be a positive, motivating step toward achieving gender expression goals. The number of pediatric gender affirming voice clients is increasing rapidly. The goal of this presentation will be to introduce the Speech Language Pathologist to basic cultural competence for working with this population, as well as provide training in multiple areas of gender affirming voice therapy. Presenters will outline current terminology used in this population. Prepubescent and postpubescent laryngeal anatomy will be reviewed. Establishing voice therapy goals for transgender men, transgender women and non-binary clients will be highlighted. This presentation will explore therapy techniques relating to pitch, resonance, intonation, articulation and non-verbal communication for use with this population. Effects of puberty suppressive medication and hormone replacement therapy on the voice will be introduced. Discussion will also include use of the VisiPitch software system for obtaining baseline and therapeutic voice measurements.

Time-Ordered Agenda

4:00-4:10    Roles and Responsibilities of the SLP
4:10-4:25    Anatomy differences
4:25-4:35    Endocrinology Involvement
4:35-4:55    Gender Affirming Voice Assessment
4:55-5:20    Gender Affirming Voice Therapy
5:20-5:30    Establishing Goals for Therapy

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • identify two differences in prepubescent and postpubescent laryngeal anatomy
      • demonstrate the ability to develop two appropriate, measurable goals for gender affirming voice therapy.
      • explain three relevant therapy techniques used in gender affirming voice therapy
      • demonstrate basic cultural competence for working with the adolescent gender affirming voice therapy population

2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Multi-Interest | S16
Level of Learning: Intermediate

The SLP: Serving Individuals Across the Gender Spectrum
Janet Hawley, ClinScD, CCC-SLP, University of Arizona

This session will focus on the dynamic and rewarding practice of providing gender-affirming voice/communication services to individuals across the gender spectrum. Novice and experienced voice clinicians are welcome. The presentation will include discussion of effective and efficient ways to: objectively and perceptually assess baseline voice/communication skills; assist your gender non-conforming clients in identifying treatment goals; and measure treatment outcomes in a holistic meaningful way. Several innovative voice/communication treatment models will be reviewed which share a focus on supporting your clients’ transitions and maximizing outcomes in a cost-effective manner. This session will also address cultural competence and creating a safe and supportive clinic environment for your clients.

Time-Ordered Agenda

2:00-2:10         Introduction: Voice and Communication Affirmation in transwomen, transmen, and gender expansive individuals

2:10-2:30         EBP evaluation

                               Interview

                               Acoustic measures

                               Perceptual measures

                               Surveys: listener, self-surveys,

                               Goal setting

2:30-2:50         EBP treatment to support congruency in voice and communication

                               Voice treatment focused on incorporation of home program

                               Non-verbals/physical presentation

                               Verbal language

2:50-3:10         Evaluation and Treatment Issues Specific to:

                               Transmen/voice and communication masculinization

                               Gender expansive/non-binary

                               Adolescent clients

3:10-3:20          Addressing diversity and inclusion

3:20-3:30          Questions

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • describe a method to identify treatment goals for potential clients across the gender spectrum.
      • list the components of a thorough client-centered voice/communication evaluation
      • describe a voice affirmation treatment model that incorporates mobile technology in a home program to optimize treatment outcomes
      • describe three self-rating forms for measuring baseline status and progress through gender-affirming voice/communication care.

4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Pediatric SLP | S17
Level of Learning: Introductory

The Price is Right- FREE Assistive Technology Tools for Schools
Mary Keeney, CCC-SLP, Arizona Department of Education
Mitch Galbraith, OTD, OTR/L, Arizona Department of Education
Margaret Egan, PT

A common misconception about assistive technology is that it is always a budget-buster. But is that true? Not always! Come to this session to learn about FREE and easily available options to support students who struggle with literacy, math, and executive function. These same tools can be used as a part of Universal Design for Learning (UDL), IEPs, transition plans, or 504s. Feel FREE to attend this session presented by members of the ADE/ESS AT team- you might even win a FREE prize.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • demonstrate knowledge of the definition of assitive technology and the laws mandating its inclusion in Individualize Education Plans.
      • identify at least three free assistive technology tools to use immediately in practice.
      • identify at least three resources to assist with the selection and implementation of assitive technology tools.


Saturday, April 1, 2023

8:00 am - 9:30 am
Pediatric SLP | S18
Level of Learning: Introductory

Bring Back the Fun!
Amy Hill, CCC-SLP, Light Street Solutions, Estrella Mountain Community College
Mary Keeney, CCC-SLP, Arizona Department of Education

Mary and Amy are back! The research tells us that it is critical that students practice a target skill at a high frequency in each session in order to progress. But when you already feel pressed for time, and you are working with mixed groups, how can you engage and motivate all your students to participate at such a high level? Come to this session to see dozens of therapy activities and reinforcers that can make therapy FUN for everyone- including you! Amy and Mary have collected these ideas and activities from SLPs and SLPAs working in schools all across Arizona, but they can easily be used in clinics and in homes as well. Session is most geared towards grades K-5.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • cite research regarding the effect of practice on progress towards therapy goals.
      • explain to others why play and fun increase the effectiveness of speech therapy.
      • locate and use the collected resources from this session.

8:00 am - 9:30 am
Adult SLP | S19
Level of Learning: Intermediate

But Everything Gets Stuck! Muscle Tension Dysphagia, Chronic Throat Clear and What to do Next When the Swallow Looks Normal
Aubrey Dunlap, MS, CCC-SLP, Midwestern University

This session will address a common complaint of the medical SLP: what to do when a patient comes in with a seemingly normal swallow on instrumentation yet complains of globus sensation, sore throat, chronic throat clearing, and a host of other symptoms. The speaker will dive into the current evidence and expert clinical opinions on managing muscle tension dysphagia and similar laryngeal tension-related diagnoses. This session will include practical information for the medical SLP to use the following Monday, including detailed therapy options and specific supports for patients who may feel their concerns have been invalidated by other providers.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • define muscle tension dysphagia.
      • describe common symptoms of muscle tension dysphagia and related laryngeal tension disorders.
      • identify three therapeutic techniques for muscle tension dysphagia.

8:00 am - 9:30 am
Multi-Interest | S20
Level of Learning: Introductory

Building Interdisciplinary Program Around Autism
Maria Dixon, MA, CCC-SLP, Arizona State University
Erin Rotheram-Fuller, PhD, Arizona State University

Students with complex disabilities require coordinated care to address communication challenges. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and educators are in a unique position to jointly support the communication goals of these students through Interprofessional Clinical Practice (IPCP). Unfortunately, most professionals are not prepared during training, nor supported in professional settings, to engage in IPCP. Existing Interprofessional Education (IPE) and IPCP models show promise in training professionals to work more effectively together before and after they enter the field, but they are not prevalent nor well-evaluated enough yet in education to draw strong conclusions. The Interdisciplinary Multicultural Professional Autism Clinical Training (IMPACT) Program prepares pre-professional service providers to use a collaborative, inclusive approach to service delivery for students with special needs. Key characteristics, strategies, and benefits of existing training and practice models for SLPs and educators are reviewed.

Time-Ordered Agenda

08:008:05 Welcoming Remarks and overview of the session  
8:058:10 Virtual survey questions of interprofessional practices 
8:109:00 Lecture/presentation 
9:009:10 Attendee activity
9:109:20 Presentation of case-based problem-solving presentation and discussion 
9:209:30 Overall session Q&A 

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • List the Interprofessional Clinical Practice (IPCP) principles for collaborative practice
      • Describe barriers to Interprofessional Clinical Practice (IPCP)
      • Describe methods to increase Interprofessional Clinical Practice (IPCP) and Interprofessional Education (IPE) for better student outcomes

8:00 am - 9:30 am
Multi-Interest | S21
Level of Learning: Intermediate

Aural Rehabilitation for Children and Adults With Cochlear Implants
Carla Zimmerman, CCC-SLP, Zimmerman Speech & Hearing Center

Cochlear implant candidacy has expanded in recent years. Candidacy criterial now includes individuals with less severe hearing losses and higher preoperative speech recognition. Non-traditional cochlear implant candidates are demonstrating significant benefit from cochlear implantation, including children and adults who may benefit from bimodal hearing – a CI on one ear and a traditional hearing aid on the other. Children and adults with single-sided deafness are now receiving cochlear implants as well. With the increased expansion in cochlear implantation, understanding post-implant aural rehabilitation becomes crucial. However, many audiologists and speech-language pathologists feel unprepared. This presentation will describe aural rehabilitation for children with congenital hearing loss, for adults with postlingual hearing loss, and for individuals with single-sided deafness. Recommendations to maximize outcomes will be provided.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • design a developmentally appropriate protocol to develop auditory skills in children with congenital hearing loss.
      • develop an effective protocol to foster auditory skills in adults who have experience with acoustic listening.
      • describe the challenges of building auditory skills in the ear of individuals with unilateral hearing loss who receive a cochlear implant, and list recommendations for auditory rehabilitation.

10:00 am - 11:30 am
Multi-Interest | S22
Level of Learning: Introductory

Gender Affirming Care for Youth: Voice and Occupational Therapy Group
Lisa Melady, MS, CCC-SLP, Phoenix Children's Hospital
Katie Appelbe, OTD, OTR/L, Phoenix Children's Hospital

The number of transgender and gender-expansive youth in need of gender affirming voice and occupational therapy support is increasing rapidly. The Gender Support Program at Phoenix Children's Hospital is striving to educate community providers on the importance of supporting the physical, mental, social and emotional health of this growing population. This educational session will summarize the initiation of an innovative group therapy program developed for adolescent and young adult clients who participate in the Gender Support Program at Phoenix Children's Hospital. This group is led by a speech-language pathologist, who specialized in gender affirming voice treatment, and an occupational therapist. Outcome measures will be administered at the commencement and conclusion of the group therapy program in order to measure effectiveness of this therapeutic process. These measure effectiveness of this therapeutic process. These measures will focus on evaluating changes in the emotional, physical and social functioning of the participants across occupations. Specific, measurable, individual goals for voice and occupational therapy will be developed and monitored throughout the 6-week program. The main purpose of this therapeutic group setting is to provide a safe place to practice gender affirming voice goals, social interactions and occupation-based tasks with peers while fostering supportive social interaction between participants. Providing a group setting should offer superior opportunities to generalize specific therapeutic goals that cannot be met in an individual session.

TIme-Ordered Agenda

10:00-10:10    Introduction
10:10-10:20    Healthcare Equality
10:20-10:30    Inclusive Patient Care
10:30-10:35    Gender Diverse Youth and Mental Health
10:35-10:45    Gender Support Program
10:45-11:00    SLP and OT Roles in Gender Support
11:00-11:15    Group Development
11:15-11:30    Group Goals

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • demonstrate knowledge on how to structure a Voice/OT Gender affirming care therapy group
      • identify two outcome measure that are appropriate for use with a Voice/OT Gender affirming care therapy group
      • identify two measurable voice therapy and two measurable occupational therapy goals appropriate for Voice/OT Gender affirming care therapy group
      • demonstrate the knowledge of insurance billing codes needed to be authorized for patients participating in group therapy for voice/OT

10:00 am - 11:30 am
Adult SLP | S23
Level of Learning: Intermediate

Head and Neck Cancer and the SLP.  What do I need to know?
Leah Mackie, MSLP, CCC-SLP,

Head and Neck cancer rehabilitation necessitates the SLP have knowledge of the methods for treatment including surgery, reconstruction, chemotherapy, radiation and immunotherapy. This seminar will cover the medical treatment of oral, oral pharyngeal and laryngeal cancer and the role of the SLP in each stage of the treatment. Common strategies used to improve swallowing and speech function including examples of modified barium swallows and video of treatment and care of altered airways will be discussed. The benefit of adjunctive therapies such as lymphedema and trismus will also be addressed.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • understand tumor staging in Head and Neck Cancer.
      • list the different types of altered airways and the equipment that is used in each type of airway.
      • understand commonly used strategies to improve airway protection for swallowing in the head and neck population.
      • understand how to evaluate for tracheoesophageal valve leakage in a total laryngectomy patient and what to do for it.

10:00 am - 11:30 am
Multi-Interest | S24
Level of Learning: Introductory

Customizing AAC for Individual/Complex Communication Needs
Danika Stampfel, CCC-SLP, Norther Arizona University
Heather Joy Magdelano, Parent
Kristy Gibson, CCC-SLP, Tobii Dynavox
Jeremy Legaspi, CCC-SLP, Prentke Romich
Douglas Cutler, CCC-SLP, Smartbox

Individuals with diverse or complex communication needs, including cortical visual impairment (CVI), dual sensory impairment/deaf blindness and/or physical/motor needs may have varying access to communication or literacy technology across the day. Adaptations and modifications are now widely available for early successes and can be individualized to meet family & individual needs.

This panel presentation will include a family member, provider (SLP) and consultant perspectives on practical options for starting and continuing to modify implementation of AAC in daily contexts, with consideration for sensory, hearing, vision and motor modifications.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • list two to three barriers to beginning AAC implementation that may impact families in the home setting.
      • describe two to three scenarios effectively supported by low-tech communication.
      • list three features of dynamic/high tech AAC to be considered for individuals multiple sensory impairment.

10:00 am - 11:30 am
Audiology | S25
Level of Learning: Introductory

Expanded FDA Criteria for Cochlear Implantation in Peds and Adults
Shawn Stevens, MD FACS, Barrow Neurological Institute

Hearing loss not amenable to use of traditional amplification may require work up for cochlear implant candidacy. In the last 15 years, rapid advances in microtized technology, materials science development, and clinical outcomes research have greatly expanded the potential pool of patients that might benefit from cochlear implantation. The goal of this presentation is to update the audience on key recent changes to FDA/Medicare candidacy criteria for cochlear implantation in both the pediatric and adult populations. Emphasis will be given to highlighting key scientific developments that have supported the approval of these new criteria.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

      • Describe key changes to cochlear implant candidacy criteria in the infant and pediatric population
      • Describe key changes to cochlear implant candidacy criteria in the adult population
      • Identify critical new developments in the biomedical design and fabrication of cochlear implants that are advancing the boundaries of this technology and who can benefit from it.

2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Pediatric SLP | S26
Level of Learning: Introductory

Supporting Clients With Feeding Disorders In the Home and School: How SLPs Can Work Together
Dena Berg, CCC-SLP,

This presentation will discuss Responsive Feeding Therapy (RFT) and how RFT can be utilized in both the home and school settings for clients with Pediatric Feeding Disorder (PFD). In this presentation, you will learn strategies for home-based and school-based SLPs to work together to better support clients/students with PFD.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • name the four domains of Pediatric Feeding Disorder and how SLPs can help children in each domain
      • utilize strategies to better provide support for people with PFD in the home and school
      • define Responsive Feeding Therapy and provide insight into how to treat students/clients with PFD using RFT

2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Adult SLP | S27
Level of Learning: Intermediate

Bilinguals and Traumatic Brain Injury: Research, Implications, and Recommendations
Tamiko Azuma, PhD, College of Health Solutions, Arizona State University
Ileana Ratiu, PhD, CCC-SLP, College of Health Solutions, Arizona State University

Adults with acquired traumatic brain injury often show deficits in executive function abilities, such as inhibition and task switching. Executive functions underlie language control processes in bilingual and multilingual individuals. As a result, these individuals can display additional language difficulties, including problems switching between languages and cross-language intrusions. Common clinical assessments were designed for monolingual individuals and are less likely to reflect these deficits. In our research, we have assessed bilingual-specific deficits using a combination of behavioral and physiological measures.  Across multiple studies, we have found that bilinguals with a history of traumatic brain injury can show subtle deficits in executive function, which are associated with language control errors.  Further, current executive function assessments do not capture these deficits and do not have adequate specificity for bilingual individuals.  This presentation will cover recent research findings and patterns of language deficits and recovery following an acquired brain injury in bilinguals as well as considerations for assessment and treatment.

Time-Ordered Agenda

2:00 – 2:20 Introduction to bilingualism and current research
2:20 – 2:30 Language loss after acquired neurogenic impact, general patterns and case studies
2:30 – 2:50 Our research examining language loss in bilinguals with traumatic brain injury
2:50 – 3:00 Patterns and factors of language recovery post acquired neurogenic impact
3:00 – 3:20 Considerations for assessment and treatment of bilinguals with acquired neurogenic impact
3:20 – 3:30 Q&A

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

      • Describe the relationship between higher-order cognitive abilities and bilingual language control.
      • Identify types of language control deficits observed in bilinguals with a history of traumatic brain injury
      • Recognize the patterns of deficits and recovery that bilinguals may experience following a brain injury
      • Describe best practices for assessing and treating bilinguals with brain injury

2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Audiology | S28
Level of Learning: Introductory

Incorporating OTC Hearing Aids into Clinical Practices
Elizabeth Walker, PhD, University of Iowa

With the creation of a new regulatory class of over-the-counter (OTC) hearing aids, many audiologists are preparing to, or recently began to, incorporate OTCs- and patients using this technology- into their clinical practices. While OTC hearing aids have the potential to increase accessibility and affordability of hearing loss treatment for millions of Americans with perceived mild to moderate hearing loss, many individuals will still benefit from the support of an audiologist. This course will provide a detailed analysis of the FDA’s final rule creating a new regulatory class of OTC hearing aids and updating the regulatory framework for prescription hearing aids, present service delivery models for servicing patients with OTC hearing aids, and discuss ways in which audiologists can market their professional expertise and service offerings. This course will also focus on ASHA’s advocacy efforts around ensuring appropriate consumer protection and device efficacy for OTCs and accessibility for prescription hearing aids. Finally, participants will get to tour ASHA’s OTC toolkit and learn how to utilize the resources available to professionals to educate the public and other health care professionals on appropriate use of OTC hearing aids and the importance of audiologic assessment and hearing loss intervention.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • summarize research and legislation resulting in the FDA’s creation of OTC hearing aids
      • define OTC and Prescription hearing aids
      • summarize OTC regulatory requirements
      • plan for clinical integration of OTCs

2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Pediatric SLP | S29
Level of Learning: Introductory

Selective Mutism: What SLPs Need to Know, Part 1
Alicia Goodman, PhD, NCSP, Simply Psychology LLC
Melissa White, MA, CCC-SLP

This session will address when, why, and how speech-language pathologists might work with children with selective mutism. Have you ever wondered how speech-language pathologists should be involved in working with children with selective mutism? In this session, we will discuss what selective mutism is, why and how a speech-language pathologist might be involved on a child's team, what to do if a family concerned about selective mutism comes to your school or clinic, and strategies for assessing and interacting with children with selective mutism. Relevant to both clinic and school-based SLPs cases will be presented.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • define selective mutism (SM)
      • describe why speech-language pathologists might work with children with SM
      • describe possible services in clinic and school settings for children with SM
      • demonstrate basic strategies for interacting with children with SM

3:45 pm - 5:15 pm
Pediatric SLP | S30
Level of Learning: Introductory

Selective Mutism: What SLPs Need to Know, Part 2
Alicia Goodman, PhD, NCSP, Simply Psychology LLC
Melissa White, MA, CCC-SLP

This session will address when, why, and how speech-language pathologists might work with children with selective mutism. Have you ever wondered how speech-language pathologists should be involved in working with children with selective mutism? In this session, we will discuss what selective mutism is, why and how a speech-language pathologist might be involved on a child's team, what to do if a family concerned about selective mutism comes to your school or clinic, and strategies for assessing and interacting with children with selective mutism. Relevant to both clinic and school-based SLPs cases will be presented.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • define selective mutism (SM)
      • describe why speech-language pathologists might work with children with SM
      • describe possible services in clinic and school settings for children with SM
      • demonstrate basic strategies for interacting with children with SM

3:45 pm - 5:15 pm
Audiology | S31
Level of Learning: Intermediate

Cochlear Implantation: Criteria, Considerations and Clinical Relevance
Lindsay Shroyer, AuD

The aspect of cochlear implants is a changing landscape in the field of audiology. The presentation will focus on updated implantation criteria, considerations for patients with progressing hearing loss, communicating referrals and outcomes of cochlear implantation. Different manufacturers will be discussed as well as any FDA indications based on manufacturer. Case presentations will be presented demonstrating different outcomes in patients followed by our clinic.

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • define cochlear implant FDA and Medicare criteria.
      • list at least two considerations for referring for cochlear implant consideration.
      • name at least two cochlear implant manufacturers.
      • discuss potential outcome benefits from cochlear implantation.

3:45 pm - 5:15 pm
Adult SLP | S32
Level of Learning: Intermediate

Rethinking Dysphagia Management Across the Continuum of Care: What are We Doing, Why and How Should We be Implementing Best Practices?
Kathleen R. Cazzato, BCS-S, University of Arizona

Best practices in dysphagia management continue to evolve with advances in research findings. As practicing clinicians it can be challenging not just to keep up with these new developments, but also to 1) effectively implement new options into clinical practice, and 2) know when it is and is not feasible to do so based on clinical caseload and setting. This session is designed to be an interactive opportunity to explore and discuss these issues. We will review; what are we being encouraged to do in terms of best practices across areas of dysphagia management? what are we doing and why? How does this change by setting? when does it make sense to implement a change in practice? When does it not?

You will be encouraged to bring your questions and your great ideas!!!

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • describe current options for best practices for a comprehensive evaluation of dysphagia
      • describe three ways these practices might need to be modified based on patient variable and/or setting.
      • identify a potential opportunity and/or a potential barrier for implementing a new methodology into current practice

3:45 pm - 5:15 pm
Pediatric SLP | S33
Level of Learning: Intermediate

SLP/SLPA Supervision: What You Need To Know
Lisa Kerrigan, CCC-SLP
Erin Gant, BA

This session will discuss the ethical guidelines for appropriate collaboration of speech-language pathologists (SLP) and speech-language pathologist assistants (SLPA). This session will review current regulations and recommendations regarding the supervision and the use of support personnel in the field. It will discuss state/local regulations regarding SLPAs and recommendations from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). This session will provide effective tools and strategies for clinical supervision.

Time-Ordered Agenda

3:45-3:50 Introductions and Learning Outcomes
3:50-4:00 Requirements of an SLPA
4:00-4:05 Kahoot - True/False - What SLPAs can/cannot do?
4:05-4:15 SLPA Can/Cannot responsibilities
4:15-4:30 Supervision requirements
4:30-4:45 Direct and Indirect supervision
4:45-4:50 Supervision/Feedback Tips
4:50- 5:05 Arizona State Requirements
5:05 -5:15 Question and Answer Session

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • discuss what is within and outside the scope of responsibilities of SLPAs who work under the supervision of SLPs.
      • describe SLP and SLPA supervision requirements and recommendations.
      • identify strategies for best practices for implementation of the SLP and SLPA model.

12:45 pm- 1:45 pm
Multi-Interest | S34
Level of Learning: Introductory

Ethics for Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists: ASHA Procedures and Resources
Elizabeth Walker, PhD, CCC-A/SLP

This session will focus on skill development in ethics related to the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology.  A member of the ASHA Board of Directors will discuss components of the ASHA Code of Ethics, identify procedures for filing and responding to ethical complaints. The session will also provide examples of ethical violations and possible sanctions according the ASHA Code of Ethics.  Finally, this session will facilitate the identification of resources related to professional ethics available through the ASHA National Office.

Time-Ordered Agenda

12:45-12:55  Overview and Background of ASHA Code of Ethics
12:55-1:20    Code of Ethics revisions
1:20-1:30      Ethical Dilemmas and Ethical Decision Making
1:30-1:40      Breakout discussions and Case studies
1:40-1:45      Board of Ethics Adjudicated Findings and Wrap Up

At the end of this presentation, participant will be able to:

      • Describe components of the ASHA code of ethics, including principles and rules.
      • Identify procedures for filing and responding to ethical complaints
      • Describe examples of ethical violations and sanctions according to the ASHA Code of Ethics
      • Identify resources available through ASHA National Office.

Handouts
Speakers

ArSHA 2023 | Featured Speakers

<strong>Manuel O. Valenzuela, EdD (Keynote Speaker)</strong><br/><em>Positively Better Together </em> - Friday March 31 from 8:00 am-9:00 am.

Since 2010, Dr. Valenzuela has served as the superintendent of the 6,400 student Sahuarita Unified School District. Dr. Valenzuela was in the first cohort to complete the National Superintendent Certification Program from the American Association of School Administrators (AASA). In 2015, Dr. Valenzuela was named the All-Arizona Superintendent of the Year for Large Districts. His superintendency has been highlighted by leading his district through significant growth, developing a strong strategic directions plan, building strong collaborative partnerships with diverse stakeholders in the region, expansion and increasing access to Advanced Placement (AP) programs, expansion of Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs, and working with institutions of higher education to support preservice professional training and development of teachers.

Dena Berg, CCC-SLP<br /><em>Supporting Clients With Feeding Disorders In The Home and School: How SLP's Can Work Together</em> - Saturday, April 1 from 2:00 pm-3:30 pm.

Dena has been a Speech-Language Pathologist for 10 years working in both home and school settings. Currently, Dena works for Arizona Advanced Therapy providing home-based therapies for clients of all ages. While she works with clients who have different therapy needs, her passion is in working with children with Pediatric Feeding Disorder using a responsive feeding approach. Dena was previously part of a mentorship cohort for professionals through Feeding Matters, and she is currently working on a multidisciplinary feeding book alongside a Registered Dietitian and Occupational Therapist.

Leah Mackie, MSLP, CCC-SLP <br /><em> Head and Neck Cancer and the SLP. What do I need to know?</em> - Saturday, April 1 from 11:00 am – 11:30 am.

Leah Mackie is a clinical speech language pathologist at Banner MD Anderson. She has been practicing for 30 years, specializing in Head and Neck Cancer Rehabilitation for the last 20 years. She is trained in acute post-surgical care of HNC and ICU patients, MBS, Trismus, TEP and laryngectomy rehabilitation as well as OP rehab for the radiation/chemotherapy patient. She has also attained certification in Head and Neck Lymphedema. She has trained and mentored students and staff as well as established protocols, policies, and programs in the area of head and neck cancer both in Canada and in the USA. In 2012 she joined the staff at Banner MD Anderson and helped start the Speech Language Pathology Cancer Program.

Erin Gant, BA, SLPA<br /><em>Supervision: What you need to know</em> - Saturday, April 1 from 3:45 pm-5:15 pm.

Erin Gant is a Speech Language Pathologist Assistant in a school-based setting. She received a BA in Sociology from Arizona State University in 2002 and her SLPA license and certificate from Estrella Mountain Community College in 2015. Erin has been an SLPA serving students from preschool to high school in the public school setting for 7 years.

Lisa Kerrigan, MS, CCC-SLP, SLP/SLPA <br /><em>Supervision: What you need to know</em> - Saturday, April 1 from 3:45 pm-5:15 pm.

Lisa Kerrigan is a certified Speech-Language Pathologist (SLP). She has more than 13 years of experience as a Speech-Language Pathologist. She received a bachelor's degree in Communication Science & Disorders and master’s degree in Speech-Language Pathology from Marywood University. She has been an SLP in the private and school-based setting since 2010. She has experience working with a variety of communication disorders. She provides clinical supervision for CFYs and SLPAs in the areas of school-based speech and language interventions.

Julie Roberts, CCC-SLP <br /><em>The Neurodiversity-Affirming Conceptual Practice Framework for Social Communication Part l & ll</em> - Friday, March 31, from 9:15 am- 10:45 am -and- 11:00am-12:30pm.

Julie Roberts, is a formally identified Autistic M.S., CCC-SLP founded Therapist Neurodiversity Collective on January 11, 2018. Professional experiences: public schools, practice owner for 7 years, multi-state Clinical Director, and National Field Director of Corporate Compliance in post-acute rehab. Julie’s articles and educational resources have reached over three-quarters of a million people.

Steven Sacks, CCC-SLP<br /> <em>Remediation of & 7 Common Error Sounds Using the SATPAC Approach Part l & ll</em> - Friday, March 31 from 2:00 pm-3:30 pm and 4:00 pm -5:30 pm.

Stephen Sacks has 42 years’ experience as an SLP working with school-age students and is the developer of the SATPAC Program and Approach for remediation of speech sound disorders. He is the 2011 recipient of the ASH Foundation Van Hattum Award for outstanding commitment and contribution in the schools.

Joshua Breger, MS, CCC-SLP<br /><em>Clinical Supervision: A Matter of Perspective</em> - March 31 from 2:00 pm-3:30 pm.

Joshua Breger is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the College of Health Solutions at ASU and the Clinic Director of the ASU Speech and Hearing Clinic. Prior to ASU he worked in the acute-care setting with special interests in dysphagia, TBI, and medically complex cases. Joshua currently supervises and teachers graduate students in the Communication Disorders Program.

Elizabeth Trueba, MS, CCC-SLP <br /><em>Clinical Supervision: A Matter of Perspective</em> - March 31 from 2:00 pm-3:30 pm.

Elizabeth Trueba is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the College of Health Solutions at ASU. She spent her early career working as a speech-language pathologist in the medical setting. She now supervises and teaches graduate students in the Communication Disorders program. Areas of particular interest include Parkinson’s, TBI, aphasia and matters related to diversity, equity and inclusion.

Tamiko Azuma, PhD<br /><em>Bilinguals and Traumatic Brain Injury: Research, Implications, and Recommendations</em> - Saturday, April 1 from 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm.

Dr. Azuma received her PhD in Psychology and completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the National Center for Neurogenic Communication Disorders. She is currently an Associate Professor of Speech and Hearing Science in the ASU College of Health Solutions. Her research focuses on cognitive processing in healthy adults and individuals with acquired neurogenic disorders.

Ileana Ratiu, PhD, CCC-SLP<br /><em>Bilinguals and Traumatic Brain Injury: Research, Implications, and Recommendations</em> - Saturday, April 1 from 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm.

Dr. Ratiu, is a Clinical Associate Professor and the Program Director for the M.S. in Communication Disorders. She completed her M.S. in Communication Disorders and Ph.D. in Speech and Hearing Science at Arizona State University. As a licensed speech-language pathologist, she works with patients with a history of traumatic brain injury and stroke. Broadly, her research examines differences in executive function, memory, language processing, and reading comprehension in monolingual and bilingual adults with acquired neurogenic disorders using both behavioral and physiological (i.e., eye tracking) measures.

Kathleen R. Cazzato MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-S<br /><em>Rethinking Dysphagia Management Across the Continuum of Care: What are we doing, why, and how should we be implementing best practices?</em> - Saturday, April 1 from 3:34 pm-5:15 pm.

Kathleen R. Cazzato is an Associate Clinical Professor at the University of Arizona and a Board Certified Specialist in Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders. She received both her undergraduate and graduate level education at Northwestern University. She has been a Medical Speech-Language Pathologist across the continuum of care for over 20 years. In her current role, she provides both classroom and clinical education for graduate students in speech-language pathology in the areas of Dysphagia and Medical Speech-Language Pathology. Her current clinical work focuses on outpatient dysphagia management in affiliation with the Banner University Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery.

Aubrey Dunlap, CCC-SLP<br /><em>But Everything Gets Stuck! Muscle Tension Dysphagia, Chronic Throat Clear and What to do Next When the Swallow Looks Normal</em> - Saturday, April 1, from 8:00 am-9:30 am.

Aubrey Dunlap is a Clinical Assistant Professor at Midwestern University. She completed her master’s degree in speech-language pathology at Nazareth College of Rochester in upstate New York. Aubrey specializes in voice and swallowing disorders, with a focus on head and neck cancer, including laryngectomy management. She has worked primarily in acute care hospitals and outpatient clinics, spending much of her career in the trauma, neuro, and COVID ICUs. She has advanced training in videolaryngostroboscopy, Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallow, and Modified Barium Swallow studies. Aubrey has taught graduate and undergraduate courses in dysphagia, acquired speech and language disorders, and voice disorders, and she has provided continuing education offerings in voice and swallowing.

Daphne Phillips, PhD<br /><em>Primary Progressive Aphasia: What are We Doing?</em> - Friday, March 31 from 11:00 am-12:30 pm.

Dr. Phillips has been a Speech Pathologist for 28 years. During that time, she has worked in hospital, acute care, rehab, day program and outpatient settings. Her areas of special interest include adult neurogenic disorders, cognitive-linguistic impairments associated with mild head injury/concussion, and student supervision. She currently works at Mayo Clinic Arizona in outpatient where she sees adults with various cognitive-communication disorders and is co-coordinator of the PPA Support Group. Dr. Phillips is a certified brain injury specialist and is also certified in LSVT LOUD and Speak OUT.

Katherine Shore CCC-SLP<br /><em>Primary Progressive Aphasia: What are We Doing?</em> - Friday, March 31 from 11:00 am-12:30 pm.

Katie Shore is a Speech-Language Pathologist and Certified Brain Injury Specialist. She has been specializing in adult neurological rehabilitation for 3 years. Her areas of interest include high-level cognitive disorders associated with brain injury, language disorders following a stroke, and neurodegenerative diseases and their associated syndromes including Primary Progressive Aphasia. In collaboration with Dr. Phillips, she assisted with the development of the PPA support group at Mayo Clinic that meets once a month.

Erin Rotheram-Fuller, PhD<br /><em>Building Interdisciplinary Programs Around Autism</em> - Saturday, April 1, 8:00 am – 9:30 am.

Erin Rotheram-Fuller specializes in research on autism and other high risk populations. She studies the school and family environment support systems around children with social challenges. Professor Rotheram-Fuller is a board certified behavior analyst as well as a licensed psychologist and provides consultation to schools and agencies on how to best support children who are struggling within the classroom or home. She trains general education teachers on what to expect in the classroom from a child on the autism spectrum and provides coaching on best practices in inclusion and social supports.

Maria V. Dixon, CCC-SLP<br /><em>Building Interdisciplinary Programs Around Autism</em> - Saturday, April 1, 8:00 am – 9:30 am.

Maria V. Dixon is a Clinical Professor at Arizona State University. Previously, she has been on clinical at Purdue University and the University of Maryland at College Park. Maria has worked with children and young adults with autism spectrum disorders and their families. Her areas of specialty are child speech and language development and disorder, autism, bilingual speech-language pathology, interprofessional education and practice and multicultural aspects of speech-language pathology service delivery.

Alicia Goodman, PhD<br /><em>Selective Mutism: What SLPs Need to Know Part l & ll</em> - Saturday, April 1 from 2:00 pm-3:30 pm and 3:345 pm-5:15 pm.

Dr. Alicia Goodman is a licensed psychologist and nationally certified school psychologist. She is the owner and director of Simply Psychology LLC in Phoenix Arizona, a multidisciplinary group practice specializing in childhood anxiety disorders, including selective mutism and providing individual therapy, comprehensive evaluations and workshops for parents and school professionals.

Melissa White, MS, CCC-SLP<br /><em>Selective Mutism: What SLPs Need to Know Part l & ll</em> - Saturday, April 1 from 2:00 pm-3:30 pm and 3:345 pm-5:15 pm.

Melissa White is a speech-language pathologist in Phoenix, AZ. She works in a public elementary school, and also has experience working in home and clinical settings, including working with children with selective mutism at Simply Psychology. She is especially interested in language assessment, reading, and school-based issues.

Janet Hawley, ClinScD, CCC-SLP<br /><em> The SLP: Serving Individuals Across the Gender Spectrum,</em> - Friday, March 31 from 4:00 pm-5:30 pm.

Janet L. Hawley is an Associate Professor at the University of Arizona. Dr. Hawley is a passionate cisgender ally for the LGBTQI+ community. She provides gender-affirming clinical services across the age spectrum. She also supports the LGBTQI+ community through her research, teaching, and outreach to students, health care professionals, general public, and the LGBTQI+ community.

Mo Mortazavi, MD<br /><em>Evidence Based Management of mTBI and Complex Concussions</em> - March 31 from 9:15 am-10:15 am.

Dr. Mohammed Mortazavi, MD is a Sports Medicine Specialist in Tucson, AZ and has over 15 years of experience in the medical field. He graduated from University of California in 2008.

Gina Santos, CCC-SLP<br /><em>Supporting Mixed Status Families In Education Settings</em> - Friday, March 31 from 11:00 am-12:30 pm.

Gina Santos, bilingual speech language pathologist, has worked in Southern Arizona for over 20 years. She has worked in inpatient and outpatient rehab settings in Tucson and Nogales as a speech language clinician and as a rehab supervisor. Currently, Gina works as a school based speech pathologist with Tucson Unified School district serving elementary and middle school students. Gina received her Bachelors of Sciences in Speech & Hearing Sciences from the University of Arizona. She attended the University of Iowa, earning her Masters of Art in Speech Pathology and later returned to University of Arizona for second masters in Educational leadership. Gina is a Tucson native, wife, and mom of 3 busy children.

Lindsay Shroyer, AuD<br /><em>Cochlear Implantation: Criteria, Considerations and Clinical Relevance</em> - Saturday, April1 from 3:45 pm-5:15 pm.

Dr. Shroyer earned her doctorate in audiology in 2012 from the University of Louisville. She has been working with Arizona Hearing and Balance Center since 2011 and continues to provide clinical care at that setting. She participates in clinical work ranging from diagnostics to implantation.

Shawn Stevens, MD<br /><em>Expanded FDA Criteria for Cochlear Implantation in Peds and Adults</em> - Saturday, April 1 from 10:00 am-11:30 am.

Dr. Shawn Stevens is a Neurotology Specialist in Phoenix, AZ and has over 7 years of experience in the medical field. Dr. Stevens has extensive experience in Otologic Conditions & Procedures. He graduated from the University of Cincinnati/Medical Center in 2016. He is affiliated with St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center.

Elizabeth Walker, PhD, CCC-A/SLP<br /><em>Incorporating OTC Hearing Aids into Clinical Practices</em> - Saturday, April 1 from 2:00 pm-3:30 pm.<br /><em>Ethics for Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists: ASHA Procedures and Resources</em> - Saturday, April 1 from 12:45 pm-1:45 pm.

Dr. Walker is an associate professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Iowa and the Director of the Pediatric Audiology and Language Laboratory. Dr. Walker's NIH-funded research focuses on pediatric audiology, specifically examining malleable factors that support listening and language outcomes for children who are deaf or hard of hearing. She has published over 50 peer-reviewed articles in the area of pediatric audiology and aural habilitation, and has co-written a textbook on pediatric amplification. She is currently serving as the Audiology At-Large member on the ASHA Board of Directors.

Carla Zimmerman, CCC-SLP<br /.><em>Aural Rehabilitation for Children and Adults with Cochlear Implants</em> - Saturday, April 1 from 8:00 am-9:30 am.

Carla Zimmerman is a speech-language pathologist and LSLS certified auditory verbal therapist, and the owner of Zimmerman Speech & Hearing in Tempe, Arizona. Her years of experience with children and adults who are deaf and hard-of-hearing have given her thousands of hours of discerning what is working and what isn't; her passion is to unravel the puzzle of what ISN'T working and then to collaborate with the family to turn things around.

Poster Sessions

Friday, March 31, 1:00 pm- 2:00 pm

K-8 Speech-Language Pathologists' Training and Implementation of Research-Based Behavioral Intervention Strategies

Ruth Scherschligt, EdD, University of South Dakota
Kyle Brouwer, PhD, University of South Dakota
Susan Gapp, EdD, University of South Dakota
Monica Iverson, EdD, University of South Dakota
Marcy Drew, EdD, South Dakota Public Broadcasting

The purpose of this study was to examine school-based speech-language pathologists' (SLPs') training and implementation of research-based behavioral intervention strategies. The study also sought to determine if there were statistically significant differences in the level of SLP training and implementation based on size of school district and years of experience in the field.

Nonexperimental, quantitative, survey research methods were used to gather the data. A researcher-developed survey with 21 response items inquiring about training and implementation of research-based behavioral intervention strategies was distributed to current members of the American Speech-Language & Hearing Association (ASHA). Information on size of district and years of experience in the field was also gathered in the survey. Additional questions were asked to supplement and clarify the quantitative data Seventy-eight qualified respondents completed the survey. Multiple independent sample 2-tailed t-tests were completed for analysis.

Results indicated that SLPs in the study had some training in research-based behavioral intervention strategies and that these strategies were implemented sometimes during speech therapy sessions. Further, results indicated that there was no statistically significant difference in SLP level of training or implementation based on years of experience or size of school district. Additional information gathering from the survey provided further insight on the types of behaviors that SLPs encountered during speech therapy sessions and how those behaviors negatively impacted their ability to provide services as well as their overall job satisfaction.

Although the results indicated that K-8 SLPs have some training and sometimes implement research-based behavioral intervention strategies, a majority of SLPs in the study felt that they were not adequately trained to handle student behavioral issues, regardless of their years of experience or the size of the district in which they worked. To better prepare SLPs to work with students who exhibit behavioral issues, particularly since there has been a  significant rise of comorbidity in elementary-age children who have a diagnosed Developmental Language Disorder (DLD) and emotional disorders (ED),  more training in research-based behavioral intervention strategies in preparation programs and professional development plans should be considered.

At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:

    • Describe to what extent are K-8 speech-language pathologists are trained in research-based behavioral intervention strategies and implementing research-based behavioral intervention strategies into students’ speech-language pathology sessions.
    • Articulate differences in K-8 SLPs’ training and implementation of research-based behavioral intervention strategies based on years of experience in the field and size of the school district where they are employed.
    • Learn more about qualitative data collected from K-8 SLPs regarding student behaviors they have experienced and the impact it has had on their job satisfaction.

The Effects of Virtual Reality With a TBI Patient

Erin McGranahan, BA, Midwestern University Graduate Student
Halle Turek, BS, Midwestern University Graduate Student
Eileen Tokarz, CCC-SLP, Midwestern University Clinical Associate Professor

Background:  Virtual Reality therapy will be implemented in an intervention as a single case study to analyze the comparison of virtual reality therapy (CAREN)  to traditional speech therapy with an individual with a TBI. This research projects the increase of overall quality of life of those with TBI and aims for a new intervention approach that individuals can respond to positively. This project will serve as the first CAREN speech-pathology research at Midwestern University that has used this intervention approach. 

Method: A Pre and Post survey was created for the client to assess her thoughts and feelings about participating in virtual reality therapy. During virtual reality therapy, the client participated in the Stroop Test and simulated experiences. Traditional therapy included a modified LSVT method and Slow, Loudness, Over articulate, and Pause method (SLOP). During the Stroop Test, her speed and accuracy were tracked at each speed level. Throughout both traditional and virtual reality therapy, her decibels were recorded in three spontaneous conversation trials.

Conclusion:  The individual showed an overall increase in the pre and post survey on a 5 point Likert scale and in qualitative and quantitative data.  After analyzing both data from traditional therapy to virtual reality, the client showed an increase in decibels and processing speed. The client reported her increase in communication with non-familiar listeners and her confidence. The project will be continuing for further research by implementing an eye tracking device to measure her progression of her processing speed.

At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:

    • Identify 3-4 items of Virtual Reality therapy increases client’s QoL through simulated real-life experiences.
    • Identify 3 to 4 data points showing dB levels for Virtual Reality was as effective to increasing dB as Traditional therapy.
    • Identify 3-4 data points that Virtual Reality exhibited an increase in client's speed in visual processing.

Implementing Montessori Program in Long-Term-Care Setting: Barriers, Challenges and Success

Malathy Venkatesh, PhD, Reunion Rehabilitation Hospital; Tempe Post-Acute
Tanya Estrada, COTA/L, TPM, Tempe Post-Acute

Despite documented evidence indicating the benefits of person-centered approaches in improving and maintaining the quality of life in residents with dementia, the practical application of this knowledge in daily life in LTC facilities is minimal. Many facilities and caregivers are still unprepared and untrained in managing residents with dementia. This paper discusses the barriers, challenges and successful implementation of a Montessori based project titled “Meaningful roles and activities for individuals with dementia” at a post-acute center in AZ. The implementation of this project was possible through a CMP fund granted to the post-acute center.  Successful outcomes of this project included staff training on highly skilled dementia programs and, establishing an “Engagement room” to encourage resident participation, maximize independence and facilitate resident engagement in meaningful activities depending on their abilities and needs. This paper also discusses the functional outcomes in four areas including Orientation, Social interaction, Cognition, and Motor skills during various stages of implementation of the program utilizing the scores obtained on a questionnaire developed specifically for this project. Although not all barriers and challenges could be overcome, this   project facilitated caregiver education and has created awareness on the importance of the need for person-centered approaches to the management of individuals with dementia in a LTC setting.

At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:

    • Describe person-center approaches to the management of residents with dementia in a LTC setting
    • Recognize the barriers and challenges in the management of residents with dementia in an institutionalized setting
    • Integrate the information provided to develop a framework they can implement at a LTC setting to address resident needs


College Readiness After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (CRAMTBI)

Evelyn Cross, BA, Northern Arizona University
Courtney Syverson, BS, Nothern Arizona University
Monica Lininger, PhD, Advisor, Northern Arizona University
Emi Isaki, PhD, Advisor, Northern Arizona University

Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI)/concussion is a worldwide public health concern affecting young adults who often return to work or college following injury. For those returning to academic studies, students with mTBI/concussion, and early or persistent symptoms that affect cognitive-communication generally struggle in their coursework. The cognitive-communication skills necessary for college are unique, and the need to identify these skills is essential for student success. A questionnaire that identifies cognitive-communication skills relevant to online and in-person coursework for students could provide much needed information for referrals to specific healthcare services and academic supports. Therefore, a 27-item questionnaire was developed, the College Readiness After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (CRAMTBI), and piloted with 7 undergraduate and 5 graduate students. The results from this pilot study were used to optimize the questionnaire prior to collection of normative data on a larger sample size. Improved understanding of cognitive-communication challenges for college students will allow for early referrals and intervention to return to the classroom.

At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:

    • Explain widespread occurrence of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI)/concussion among young adults.
    • Identify symptoms and persistent deficits associated with mTBI/concussion.
    • Describe the cognitive-communication processes necessary for academic performance in college.


Effects of SFA and Verbs, Compared to VNeST, on PWA

Alexie MacKay, BS, Midwestern University
Brittany Eberson, BS, Midwestern University
Stephanie Christensen, PhD, Midwestern University

This project intends to demonstrate that SFA can be used to provide an effective action word retrieval strategy when creating a sentence in PWA, over VNeST. Using SFA is expected to benefit the patient by increasing comprehension and vocabulary skills, whereas VNeST only targets improving the ability to create sentences. This study intends to measure outcomes based on pre-and post-testing when assessing the rate and accuracy of creating a sentence with an action word using SFA and VNeST. The expected outcome is to see improvements in the rate and accuracy of the targeted action word using SFA versus VNeST therapy intervention in PWA. A single-subject, multiple baseline across behaviors and alternating treatment design was used. The participant is a 73-year-old Caucasian male, who is 4 years, 4 months, post-onset of an ischemic cerebrovascular accident. Treatment was given twice a week for 60-minute sessions, alternating between SFA and VNeST, randomizing the probe words each week. Both SFA and VNeST therapy interventions were effective in this study. However, these results indicate that the SFA therapy intervention promotes a slightly more accurate sentence production (complete, appropriate patient & correct use of the verb), as well as producing the sentences in a timely manner. Due to closely related rates and accuracy, more research is warranted to explore the SFA and VNeST treatment interventions when creating a sentence with an action word for PWA.

At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:

    • Describe why the VNeST is 24 milliseconds slower than SFA
    • Describe why the SFA is .05 more accurate when creating a complete sentence
    • Describe why the SFA is .12 more accurate when choosing a specific patient appropriate to the verb
    • Describe why the SFA is .02 more accurate when using the correct use of the verb

Cultural Factors That Influence Pediatric Feeding and Swallowing Services

Cynthia Fangman Farrell, CCC-SLP, Northern Arizona University
Natalie Arnold, BS, Northern Arizona University
Talia Brierly, BA, Northern Arizona University
Rebecca Gerety, BS, Northern Arizona Unversity

The purpose of this poster is to increase awareness of the need for SLPs to provide culturally competent evaluation, diagnostic, and intervention for children with Pediatric Feeding Disorders (PFD).  ASHA emphasizes the importance of cultural competence in addressing dysphagia with broadening our definition of cultural diversity beyond language and ethnic foods to include religion, lifestyle, views of disability or Western medicine, and family member roles (Riquelme, 2004).  Cultural factors can impact when children achieve developmental milestones with eating and drinking skills.  Therefore, cultural factors need to be taken into consideration when examining “abnormal” feeding and swallowing skills within the client’s cultural context (difference vs. disorder) (Constantinia et al, 2019).  In addition to cultural differences, children with low socioeconomic status may not have access to health care, adaptive equipment, food, and/or insurance coverage necessary to meet the family’s needs (McCarty & Hasselkus, 2009).  This poster will include culturally sensitive diagnostic and treatment strategies and methods to ensure cultural competence and socioeconomic equality in serving children with PFD across practice settings. 

At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:

    • List the cultural and socioeconomic factors that may influence practice in feeding and swallowing disorders.
    • List some ways that SLPs can be proactive in addressing these factors in dysphagia service provision.
    • Identify three specific methods or procedures that an SLP can implement to ensure culturally competent service provision in this practice area.

A Pediatric Feeding Disorder (PFD) Interprofessional Assessment Protocol

Cynthia Fangman Farrell, CCC-SLP, Northern Arizona University
Natalie Arnold, BS, Northern Arizona University
Talia Brierly, BA, Northern Arizona University
Rebecca Gerety, BS, Northern Arizona University

Pediatric Feeding Disorder (PFD) is impaired oral intake that is not age-appropriate and is associated with at least one of four closely related domains which include medical, nutritional, feeding skill, and/or psychosocial dysfunction (Goday et al, 2019).  This newly CDC approved PFD is a “stand-alone” diagnostic code in the new 2021 ICD-11.  The definition has been accepted by all professionals establishing a common terminology that has impacted clinical practice, education, research, and advocacy in both healthcare and education settings.  This diagnostic framework ensures that children with PFD have access to all specialist and interprofessional team members needed to address their eating and drinking difficulties (Homer, 2014).  Current assessment tools may not address all of these diagnostic areas and/or rely on parent report to gain diagnostic information (Heckathorn et al, 2015).   This poster will present an assessment tool that addresses all four components of this newly accepted PFD definition. 

At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:

    • List the four domains included in the newly CDC approved definition of a Pediatric Feeding Disorder (PFD).
    • Describe the benefits of using a common framework and terminology for PFD diagnosis across practice settings.
    • Identify important team members involved in the using the four components in making diagnostic decisions in this practice area.

School-Based SLP Experiences During COVID

Sandra Stewart, EdD, Northern Arizona University and ArSHA Schools Committee
Darrell Dern, CCC-SLP, ArSHA Schools Committee
Michelle Thomas, CCC-SLP, Northern Arizona University and ArSHA Schools Committee

This poster presents results from a study using focus group methods to explore Arizona school-based SLP attitudes toward speech-language therapy and gain greater understanding of: (1) current attitudes toward telepractice and its role in future speech-language services; (2) the facet of service provision that currently concerns SLPs most and what associated change/s they would like to see; (3) whether they have recently struggled with a decision to leave the profession and issues related to the struggle; (4) pivotal supports that have existed for SLPs during this period; and (5) whether, and in what way their feelings about service provision have changed since the start of the pandemic.

NOTE: This focus group took place on October 29th and results are still being coded.

At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:

    • Identify and discuss current attitudes toward telepractice in the school setting.
    • Describe current attitudes toward the future use of telepractice in the schools and list 3 aspects of telepractice those interviewed would like to see continue.
    • List at least 3  SLP service delivery challenges and/or successes using telepractice, and in general, throughout the pandemic.

Exploring Bone Conduction Practices for Various Head Coverings: A Survey

Duc Phan, BS, A.T. Still University
Perri Fine, MS, A.T. Still University
Patricia Stanley, BS, A.T. Still University
Diana Roman, BS, A.T. Still University - Arizona School of Health Sciences
Kimberly Skinner, AuD, PhD, A.T. Still University
Elizabeth Palmer, AuD, CCC-A, A.T. Still University - Arizona School of Health Sciences
Tania Vega, BS, A.T. Still University

Bone conduction testing is a foundational component of a comprehensive audiologic evaluation. However, no formal protocol has been developed for head coverings (e.g., wig, cap, turban, hijab, or headscarf) and bone conduction testing. Anecdotally, there appears to be variety amongst hearing care professionals as to which head coverings are routinely removed for bone conduction testing. The purpose of this study was to investigate current bone conduction testing practices among licensed hearing care providers in the United States. A survey was developed to probe questions of bone conduction testing protocols and whether modifications were made for various forms of head coverings. The survey consisted of both Likert-type questions asking the frequency with which the respondent encounters patients with various types of head coverings, and also asked participants to rate the frequency with which they ask patients to remove each head covering type prior to bone conduction testing. The survey also consisted of open-ended questions, asking respondents to elaborate on why they would or would not have a patient remove a particular head covering for bone conduction testing.

With the population of the United States becoming more diverse, and the religious significance of many head coverings a hearing care provider may encounter professionally, we also wanted to examine hearing care professionals’ perceptions regarding religious discrimination. We asked the extent to which participants agreed that religious discrimination is a problem in US healthcare.

A total of 233 responses from hearing professionals with verifiable state licenses were received. These results are presented here.

At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the frequency of unoccluded bone conduction testing in a sample of hearing care professionals.
    • Identify the types of head coverings commonly removed for bone conduction testing.
    • Identify the perception of religious discrimination in a sample of hearing care professionals.

Language of Love: Factors that Strengthen Relationships After Aphasia

Heather Riddle, BS, Midwestern University
Stephanie Christensen, CCC-SLP PhD, Midwestern University
Colin Macpherson, CCC-SLP MA, Midwestern University

Previous research has revealed negative effects of aphasia on relationships, including friendships (Ford, et al., 2017) and partnerships (Stead, 2021). However, characteristics of relationships that aid in the relationships lasting despite the development of aphasia in one partner have not been readily investigated. For couples to navigate the difficult and complicated changes that aphasia creates, it’s essential to create a foundation of knowledge about the positive traits present in a relationship and how these traits affect intimacy and communication. The purpose of the current work was to determine characteristics present in relationships of couples that lasted through the changes of aphasia. Researchers interviewed three people with aphasia and their partners who self-identified as successfully having navigated the challenges of aphasia. All interviews were audio recorded and transcribed. Participants also completed the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS), a measure of relationship satisfaction. A phenomenological analysis revealed two major themes for characteristics present in the relationship of participants: self-pruning of characteristics and humor. Self-pruning was the most prominent theme with this behavior being described during discussions of changes partners made to aid each other. Humor was the second theme with participants stating that humor had always been an important factor in their relationship and helped them with remaining connected after aphasia. These results indicate that a willingness to change for the partner and maintaining a sense of humor can aid a relationship through the changes brought on by aphasia.

At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:

    • State two factors important for maintaining strong partner relationships after aphasia.
    • Discuss how three partners utilized humor and self-pruning to navigate the changes of aphasia.
    • State one factor about the benefit of discussing relationship factors with patient's.

Acquisition of dysphagia-specific knowledge for individuals with Parkinson disease: A pilot brochure

Rosa Stewart, BA, Northern Arizona University
Heidi Wayment, PhD, Northern Arizona University
Rebecca Bartlett, PhD, Northern Arizona University

Introduction: Despite the systemic impact of Parkinson disease (PD), only 55% of affected individuals feel that they have the disease-specific knowledge that they need (Riggare et al., 2017). Currently available patient resources about dysphagia related to PD have shortcomings, such as being text-heavy or missing areas of interest. The purpose of this project was to use interview data to create a useful and targeted swallowing resource for individuals with PD.

Methods: Oral surveys were conducted with a national sample of individuals with PD (n = 25) in order to describe the experience of coping with the physiological and psychosocial consequences of dysphagia. The present project focused on a subset of the responses from participants about their knowledge of dysphagia, specific questions about dysphagia, and preference of modality to receive information.

Results/Discussion: Sixty percent (15/25=60%) of the sample reported that they do not have a good understanding of dysphagia, and 92% of participants wanted to know more. A pamphlet was the most popular education modality selected by participants. Among the questions posed by participants, seven themes were identified, with dysphagia treatment options being the most frequent. The authors developed a pilot pamphlet to address the most common questions. The pamphlet will be summarized on the poster and presented to a subset of the participants through a member check in the future.

Conclusion: By having access to knowledge about dysphagia, individuals may be better equipped to understand and cope with their condition, advocate for their care, and make informed health care decisions.

At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:

    • Name three common questions posed by individuals with dysphagia secondary to PD.
    • Identify the two modalities most preferred by individuals with PD for receiving information about dysphagia.
    • Brainstorm how the pamphlet could be distributed, once the member check is complete.

Implementing the Regularity Principle: Implications for Self-Supervision

Madison Decker, BA, Midwestern University
Adalia Mullakandov, BS, Midwestern University
Colin Macpherson M.A., CCC-SLP, Midwestern University

Plante and Gomez (2018) described the critical importance of implicit learning in the language acquisition process. These authors described the regularity principle as crucial for implicit learning. The regularity principle consists of two components: frequency of occurrence and consistency. Frequency of occurrence consists of providing as many linguistic targets as possible in a specified time frame. Each utterance that contains a linguistic target could be considered a treatment dose (Alt et al., 2020). Consistency refers to making the linguistic target the most frequently occurring linguistic structure in a specified time frame. Implementation of the consistency component assumes that a large majority of the utterances spoken by the student speech-language pathologist would be considered treatment doses.

We examined the implementation of regularity principle in focused stimulation intervention for early word learning. Specifically, we examined the number of treatment doses provided (i.e., frequency of occurrence) as well as the proportion of dose utterances to utterances not containing the linguistic target (consistency) during five focused stimulation treatment sessions. The participant was a two-year-old female with severely restricted word comprehension and production skills. Treatment dose, dose number, total number of doses, and dose form (Alt et al., 2020) were specified and examined during treatment.

The results of our study indicated that the student speech language pathologist improved their ability to implement both aspects of the regularity principle over time. Our findings suggest possible methods that speech language pathologists can use to determine whether they are implementing the regularity principle in focused stimulation intervention.

At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the importance of the Regularity Principle in language acquisition
    • Describe the two major components of the Regularity Principle.
    • Determine the use of frequency of occurrence and consistency computations for self supervision

Effects of Late Preterm Birth on Communication and Feeding

Abigail Harris, The University of Arizona
Jennifer Casteix, CCC-SLP, The University of Arizona

Every year in the United States, approximately 267,000 infants are born late preterm, meaning between 34 0/7 weeks to 36 6/7 weeks gestation (March of Dimes Peristats). This number accounts for 70% of all preterm births, and early birth places these infants at risk for health and developmental risks, including communication and feeding delays (Stewart et al, 2019). However, not much is readily known on developmental outcomes of this cohort of infants. In addition, not all US based graduate programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) may be preparing future SLPs to practice in this area of our field (Farrugia, 2022). This presentation reviews available developmental information on late preterm infants from birth to 24 months of age, with a focus on communication and feeding development. This information may inform CSD training programs on future directions.

At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:

    • Identify one developmental feeding risk in a 12 month old infant and in a 24 month old infant born late preterm.
    • Describe two developmental communication risks in a 12 month old infant and a 24 month old infant born late preterm.
    • Name two risk factors affecting women that can lead to late preterm delivery of their infants.

CE Info


Speaker Disclosures (PDF)


The supervision courses (Sessions 12 and 33) are offered separately for up to 0.3 ASHA CEUs (intermediate level)

The ethics course (Session 34) is offered separately for 0.1 ASHA CEUs (intermediate level)

The DEI courses (Sessions 5, 6, 8, 15, 16, 20, 22, 27) are offered separately for up to 1.05 ASHA CEUs (intermediate level)


The following sessions are eligible for American Academy of Audiology CEUs:

S12
S21
S25
S34 (Ethics)
S28
S31


Exhibitors